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Well, your pockets run deep & for a noob, that is fine, but understand that your learning curve w/ a semi automated press is steep. It's not that you can't get high quality ammo, but as a noob, you are likely to just be pulling the handle & not learning what you are actually doing. Reloading ammo is not baking a cake, there will be consequences for mistakes.
The more complicated the system, the more likely you are to make errors as automated things jamb & you may forget where you are at & what you are doing. So having said that. I recommend a bit more research. The ABCs of Reloading or a minimum of two reloading manuals like the Speer #14 & Lyman #49. Both have good sections on the process of reloading.
The 650 is a great machine, but unless you are loading 1000rds per week, way more machine than you need. With a bullet & case feeder to change over between 9mm & 45acp, you are looking at 20min or so to get things running again. The bullet feeder can be added at anytime, so I would go w/ the 650 & case feeder first. Learn to load on that & if you feel the need to add complication to the process, get the bullet feeder. A 650 will easily load 700rds/hr, add the bullet feeder & if everything goes good, you can exceeed 1000rds/hr. So as you can see, way more press than the avg shooter needs, but nothing wrong w/ that. I load on a 550 & a 650 & still use my single stage press quite a bit. Then I load for 20+ diff calibers.
When I buy once fired brass, I go to one of several on line places. You can find good deals @ gunshows too, but never sure what you are buying. You can scrounge a lot of brass too. I haven't bought a 9mm case in 25yrs, way too much of it at most ranges. Just be careful, some brass, especially 9mm & 40 have been abused by there previous owners & may be a problem if you are going to reload near max.
 

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Skip the bullet feeder unless you also buy a powder check die.
For me the bullet feeder means no visual quality control and I would not trust the machine vs my own eyes.

The 650 is a great choice. Just load one cartridge at a time the first few hundred rounds till you understand every single stage or process completely.

Get range brass or buy locally from forums.

New brass works too but expensive.
I just say skip the bullet feeder, there are drawbacks, but it does speed up the round count w/o loss of QC. It takes up another space on the tool head, so unless you want to seat & crimp in one step, there is no room for a COP. Since I like to shoot lead bullets, I find better results seating & crimping in separate steps. The COP is a nice backup safety feature, but like you, I want to see the powder charge, not trust the machine. If you change calibers frequently, add more time to the change w/ a bullet feeder. Oh yeah, the feeder also doesn't play well w/ lead bullets, about all I reload in my handgun stuff.
 
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