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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had just purchased some BE-86 powder by alliant and I have 135 gr rainier plated fp projectiles and I can not find any load data for 40 s&w. Rainier say load mid range using fmj data, but alliant dose not publish any data for a 135 grain fp only 135 grain hp. Any tips will I be safe using the hp data and will my oal min oal remain the same.
 

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In your case, the weights are the same. The profile of the bullet (FP vs HP) won't really make a difference in load data, UNLESS you have to seat the FP farther into the case to get it to feed reliably. If you have to seat it deeper, you'll need to work up a reduced charge that hits the same velocity and SD/ES, and feeds reliably in your gun.

Load data is normally CAST -> PLATED -> JACKETED, in order of lowest range to highest range. Say you had XX123 powder, and a cast bullet, a plated bullet, and a jacketed bullet. Say your jacketed data shows 5.0gr minimum to 7.0gr maximum. For the same profile and weight plated bullet, data could show 4.0gr minimum to 6.0gr maximum. Cast can be even lower than that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
40 S&W 135 gr JHP Federal 1.12 4 Fed 100 BE-86 8.9 1,343 -
This is alliant max load data. They say reduce by 10 percent to start so I'm reducing by 11.2 percent to put me at a start load of 7.9.
 

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BE86 is another powder I wish I could try, but so far I cannot find it. I sincerely hope 03Plinker will keep us informed as he experiments with the stuff with different bullet weights or calibers. I think it should be a pretty good all around powder, but the way Alliant goes about showing only max loads data is pretty sparse at this time. So... keep at it and keep us informed.

Where'dya get the stuff anyway?
 

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Alliant has answered this type of inquiry from me directly in the past--I was loading 200gr HPs to +P but found no data...

They said bullet weight matters more than profile...essentially, loading an FMJ with HP data or loading Plated bullets with FMJ data is ok--but they recommend a load work-up based upon a 12-15% reduction stepped up in 5% intervals (if you have access to a Chrono this is a piece of cake)

With .40s&w typically a 10% reduction is sufficent as long as the suggested OAL will feed reliably (as mentioned above)

OP: Are you trying to produce plinking loads or are you looking to load a lighter projectile to +P or +P+ velocities? Your desired end result can help me fine-tune your best potential starting point
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@ justsomeguy I went to 5 different shops looking for pistol powder and everyone was completely sold out except one which only had the BE-86. I've loaded some 45 acp with it using berrys 230 gr and it worked pretty good. I haven't tested it with a crono yet. It was also a little dirtier then I thought it would .

@ r3dbull4dd1kt I emailed alliant and they responded very quickly but unfortunately they couldn't help. They said to contact rainier and rainier told me they don't publish data. It was worth a shot though.
 

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In all cases, bullet weight/construction is the name of the game. COL is dependent on you and your gun. COL in loading manuals is just what they used based on whatever their guidelines and SAAMI requirements are for testing purposes only.
Look in the Hornady manual and you'll see that they have all jacketed bullets of the same weight under the same load data.
Load to a longer COL than the manual, start with the lowest starting load you can find, and work up just like always.
If you can't find data for your specific bullet weight, start with the next heavier bullet's data.
In most cases, plated bullets are loaded just like lead bullets. In cases of thick plating, you might be able to load just like jacketed, but the bullet maker's web sight or call will get you that information.
I am shocked at this recommendation, but this is from Rainier's web site:
We, at Rainier Ballistics, recommend using Jacketed bullet load data when loading our bullets. There is no need for adjustment when using Jacketed bullet load data. Our bullets are jacketed using an electroplating process and are softer than traditionally jacketed bullets; Be sur to use ONLY load data that is published in a reputable reloading manual.

***If you only have access to traditionally jacketed load data, we recommend a starting powder charge directly between the listed minimum and maximum load, and you may use published load data found in reputable reloading manuals.

A slight roll or taper crimp may be used with our bullets;

Overcrimping plated bullets may result in decreased accuracy, and fragmentation of copper plating.


I have NEVER seen a recommendation to start anywhere except at the starting load and I know from personal experience that the starting load in one manual could be a max or over max load in my gun with my exact components, but that is what they print. I really hope they meant "traditionally lead load data..."
 

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@ justsomeguy I went to 5 different shops looking for pistol powder and everyone was completely sold out except one which only had the BE-86. I've loaded some 45 acp with it using berrys 230 gr and it worked pretty good. I haven't tested it with a crono yet. It was also a little dirtier then I thought it would .

@ r3dbull4dd1kt I emailed alliant and they responded very quickly but unfortunately they couldn't help. They said to contact rainier and rainier told me they don't publish data. It was worth a shot though.
I will consult my loading manuals this evening when I get home from work-- and if nothing else I will email a couple gents from Brianenos dot com and see if they have any insights
 
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