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OK reloading gods,

I've only been actively rolling for about a month now using a Lee Classic Turret, and I'm already thinking about getting a manually-indexing progressive press, specifically the RCBS Pro 2000. I find myself going to the range at least once a week, and I'd like to make more ammo in less time.

However, I'm still a newbie who doesn't know what he doesn't know, despite whatever success I've had so far. So, I'm looking for some sage advice to make sure I'm not biting off more than I can chew given my new-found (over?!) enthusiasm for this great hobby, hence the question in the title of this thread. Thoughts? :mrgreen:
 

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I like the 2000, basically a 5 stn copy of the Dillon 550b. I am just not a fan of the priming strips.
For me, when I started competing in gun games, I needed to spend less time reloading. When I was going thru 600rds of 45colt a week, time to find a Faster method. That was my first 550.
Buy what ever press you like, run it as an inverted turret, one round at a time thru all the stations. When you feel you've got everything running right, then start using it as a progressive. I now also run a 650 w/ case feeder. From a pile of components to 700 rds in 1 hour. The 550 & RCBS 2000 will be around 450, plenty fast enough. You'll wonder why you waited so long.
 

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You're gonna be hard put to improve on the Lee Classic unless you go Dillon with accompanying cost. The Classic can run in automatic advance mode.
 

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You're gonna be hard put to improve on the Lee Classic unless you go Dillon with accompanying cost. The Classic can run in automatic advance mode.
I think the LCT is a good press, although priming is temperamental. If you get it running right, 150rds/hr is sustainable. For the $$, it fills most needs. Very few of us need a progressive, me included today. I shoot every weekend, 150-200 rds. Easily done in 60-90 min on the LCT.
It s nice to run a good progressive though. One pull of the angle per rd vs 3-4 of the LCT. Over time, saves a Lot of wear & tear on the old body.;) I can drop into the garage, in 30m from start to finish, have 300 rds of ammo ready for the weekend. Progressives give you options to go fast or slow. It's good to have options. Again, too much is made over cost of equip. Guys happily to spend $1000 on a couple cases of ammo a year, but balk at $1000 for a quality, high speed reloading setup that last you 40-50 yrs.:confused:
 

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Again, as Fred implies and I have often said, you should buy the equipment needed to fill what you envision as YOUR needs... not just now, but what you foresee as will be needed as your interest grows. If you think you can get buy on 150rnds per month, that is a lot different than 3-400rnds per week, and the purchase of equipment should reflect that. I have nothing against even single stage presses... heck I have one myself, but I don't do my actual bulk reloading on it. I use if for brass fixing with a push through die, the occasional rifle cartridge experiment, or a myriad of other things that such a press is useful for. For almost all my other reloading tasks I have a couple of 650's, an LNL, and a now unused Square Deal B, but I will shoot 3-500rnds per week in decent weather. I am not recommending ANY press for anyone else's situation, but only that you consider your needs and buy accordingly. No matter what you wind up with, it will be WAY less expensive than buying factory loaded ammunition, and you will have components on hand, once you get going, so that you will always HAVE ammunition.
 

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I think the LCT is a good press, although priming is temperamental. If you get it running right, 150rds/hr is sustainable. For the $$, it fills most needs. Very few of us need a progressive, me included today. I shoot every weekend, 150-200 rds. Easily done in 60-90 min on the LCT.
It s nice to run a good progressive though. One pull of the angle per rd vs 3-4 of the LCT. Over time, saves a Lot of wear & tear on the old body.;) I can drop into the garage, in 30m from start to finish, have 300 rds of ammo ready for the weekend. Progressives give you options to go fast or slow. It's good to have options. Again, too much is made over cost of equip. Guys happily to spend $1000 on a couple cases of ammo a year, but balk at $1000 for a quality, high speed reloading setup that last you 40-50 yrs.:confused:
I use the Lee Safety Prime and don't have any problems with it. I reload to keep myself in practice ammo - maybe 100-200 rounds a week, so I don't need the speed of a progressive. I also like the ease of "backing up" on a turret if something goes wrong during the cycle. Once the press is loaded, it seems like one pull - one round, but the round still has to go through 3-4 stations to pop out eady to fire. You have a point on the $$$. Buy good to begin with, but you don't always need all the bells and whistles.

Each reloader decides what they will need and buys accordingly.
 

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My LCT works great. As Fred said the priming system can be finicky. Something to do with the angle you push it at doesn't fair well with my left thumb all of the time. Now if I can find time to load. That's my biggest problem!
 

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My LCT works great. As Fred said the priming system can be finicky. Something to do with the angle you push it at doesn't fair well with my left thumb all of the time. Now if I can find time to load. That's my biggest problem!
Time is the biggest reason to go progressive. One pull of the handle, one loaded round. Not possible on a turret of any kind. For those that like the ability to control the movements of their progressive, the Dillon 550B is a perfect tool. Manual indexing, run it fast or slow one round or 4 at a time. More $$ than the LCT, sure, a lot more, what, $250? The time save alone pays for that in one year. Again, most of us just don't need a progressive, but having & not needing is always better than needing & not having.
 

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I started reloading in 1991 before Al Gore invented the internet so I did not know I was not supposed to start with a progressive press. My first press was a Dillon SDB set up for .38 wadcutters and I added a conversion for .45 acp shortly afterwards. I haven't blown up any guns and still have all my fingers and eyeballs. I take my time and pay attention to what I am doing.

After the 2008 election I got back into shooting and have since added 2 more Square Deals and a Dillon 650. I change presses rather than change calibers.
 
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