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Full disclosure upfront...I only have one reload batch under my belt, so I still don't know what I don't know.

I just read a story on another forum about how an experienced reloader still gets a squib every now and then, even with an established QC process. From what I gathered, that person was using a machine to dispense powder charges.

It was suggested to me that I measure and load powder by hand using scoops and a powder trickler first, before introducing another layer of QC with a powder dispenser. I have a Lee Classic Turret, but I prime and add powder charges off of the press. After having done that first batch, I saw how time-consuming it was to measure every charge by hand. But it was easy to look at every cartridge on the block to compare each charge to the others, ensuring safety.

For people like me who were already OCD before getting into reloading, did you start out like I am by using scoops/trickler, or did you jump straight to a powder dispensing machine? I was looking at the RCBS Uniflow dispenser, but I don't think I'm ready for that yet...thoughts? :confused:
 

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I started on a progressive and used the Dillon SDB. I didn't charge each load by hand, but I went really slow, verified the powder drop many many times, then while loading measured every load for a while, then every other, then one out of five and so on. Once I was confident in my equipment AND ensured myself that one of my steps was always powder confirmation, then I went to verify weight 3 or 4 times per 100.
 

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I started out by using scoops and a trickler. After a few years, I just recently moved up to using my Hornady powder measure. Still no problems, but I'm not letting it go to my head. A careful handloader won't have problems. A "careful" handloader that goes through the motions without having their brains engaged will have problems.

Make sure your brain is engaged when handloading, and try to minimize distractions. If you're in the middle of an operation and someone walks in and starts running their mouth (wife, I'm looking at you), ignore them until you're done with the operation and THEN address their concern.

P.S., I love my wife and she knows better than to interrupt unless she has to, but she does have "blond moments" from time to time. True emergencies are not to be ignored, but be very careful when you return to the bench and make sure you retrace your steps on where you were at in the reloading process before starting again.
 

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I split through difference. I use a single stage, but I use a Hornady autocharge to dispense the charge for me while I am pulling the handle to seat the bullet. Saves me time while letting me assure I have the correct charge.

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I have only loaded handgun rounds (.40 and .45), using a single stage press. I will clean, deprime, and bell in large batches, but my OCD kicks in during the final stages. No music is allowed during the primer & powder steps. I work in batches of no more than 50. And after loading the powder I visually inspect every case to see if the powder is present and consistent from case to case. Only then do I seat the bullet and crimp. It takes some time, but has served me well so far.
 

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When I first started in early December I thought it would be a great idea to prime my cases in a separate first step on my newly acquired LCT. 2 squibs in the first 20 rounds proved me very wrong. I rethought the process and now have loaded and fired over 8,000 rounds with no further problems.
I now deprime 600 cases.
Tumble the 600 cases.
Go thru each step from priming to finished bullet.
I weigh powder charges often.
I set up a light so I can look into each case after powder has dropped.
I'm far from OCD so I make it a point to stop and take a break every 50 rounds to review everything I've done and double check everything. So far so good.
 

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loading is one of the things I get really OCD about, especially for rifle, cleaning primer pockets, cleaning/deburring flash holes, sizing, trimming,chamfering/deburring necks, weighing each charge individually, double checking that EVERY round is the same base to ogive =/- .0005.....loading is a hobby just as much as shooting is
 

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IMO, when it comes to reloading there is no such thing as OCD.

Mistakes will be made. Lessons will be learned. It's all part of the process.
 

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1. I run the brass through the polisher to clean them

Then I inspect the brass to see if any are cracked/split and toss out any bad cases

2. I resize them

Then I inspect the brass to see if any are cracked/split and toss out any bad cases

3. I bell them

Then I inspect the brass to see if any are cracked/split and toss out any bad cases

4. Then I prime the cases

Then I inspect the primers to make sure all are seated correctly

5. I use an empty plastic cartridge box insert to hold the brass while putting powder into them with my powder measure

Then I use a small flashlight to look at the powder levels in the cases and I weigh the powder charge of any case that appears to have more/less powder than the rest. In any event I weigh the powder charges from 5 random cases to insure the powder measure is putting consistent charges in each case.

6. Then I seat the bullets one at a time

Then I inspect each round to insure I didn't miss anything during my previous inspections.

No distractions. No TV, no conversations with others, etc. while reloading.
 

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You can actually make greater mistakes scooping & weighing vs using a measure. Once a measure a set, then throwing charges is 100% repeatable.no misreading the scale or varying your scoop technique.
 

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I have been reloading on progressive presses for many years now. I don't get squibs. I do get an occasional dud from a bad or reversed primer, but it is rare. This is range ammo mostly. If I reload for some "self defense" loads, they will go into 50 or 100rnd ammo cases with the primers UP so I can see them. I never get a dud with any of those.

I don't think automated powder measures are a negative. They are remarkably accurate if you do your part. My SD figures with the types of powders I prefer are generally in the single digits so things are working right.

It's good to be concerned and careful. Just don't overthink things and introduce chances for error where there are none.
 

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I have only loaded handgun rounds (.40 and .45), using a single stage press. I will clean, deprime, and bell in large batches, but my OCD kicks in during the final stages. No music is allowed during the primer & powder steps. I work in batches of no more than 50. And after loading the powder I visually inspect every case to see if the powder is present and consistent from case to case. Only then do I seat the bullet and crimp. It takes some time, but has served me well so far.
Same here except only 9mm and 45acp.

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You can actually make greater mistakes scooping & weighing vs using a measure. Once a measure a set, then throwing charges is 100% repeatable.no misreading the scale or varying your scoop technique.

Right you are, Fred!! Been reloading for several years on my SDB, use my scale every once in a while, (800 - 1000 rounds), I am amazed how accurate and consistant the powder measure. Had 1 double charge about 5 1/2 years ago, no problems since. No brag, just fact. Like wise, sometimes I will have a "dud" primers. Otherwise, no problems!!!!
 

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I pay attention, but it's not self-defeating to the relaxing goal. I've used a powder dispenser from day one and just make sure to double check your work. Using two trays could help you. Not everyone has errors. Pay attention and you'll be fine.

Some of you are way too overboard. No radio? It's not that mind blowing to measure and charge ammo.
 

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I run a Hornady progressive press. It's Great! It has all of the bells and whistles, case loader, bullet loader, etc.... I stripped it all off. I run one round at a time now and am still able able to make quantity along with QC. I had one squib with in first 1500 rounds with the B & W's on so I decided to slow down and back to basics. The nice thing about the progressive press is that you still have five stations set up even though I'm only making one round at a time I can see each round from start to finish. Less chance for multiple errors. I also check weight every 10th pour for the first 100, then about every 25 and so on.
 

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I pay attention, but it's not self-defeating to the relaxing goal. I've used a powder dispenser from day one and just make sure to double check your work. Using two trays could help you. Not everyone has errors. Pay attention and you'll be fine.

Some of you are way too overboard. No radio? It's not that mind blowing to measure and charge ammo.
Well, some folks are more prone to distractions and mistakes than others. Erring on the side of caution, then, requires we suggest the safest route, and then let the reloader decide for themselves whether they're safe enough to have some entertainment on. I won't sit here and say that since I'm not prone to making those types of mistakes that everyone is as awesome as I am. ;)
 

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For people like me who were already OCD before getting into reloading, did you start out like I am by using scoops/trickler, or did you jump straight to a powder dispensing machine? I was looking at the RCBS Uniflow dispenser, but I don't think I'm ready for that yet...thoughts? :confused:
I started out using a Lee Pro Auto Disc powder dispenser. The trick is to use a RELIABLE dispenser and LOOK into each case as it comes around. The Uniflow is VERY accurate and reliable.
 

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My family tells me that I am quite CDO; which is just like OCD except it is in alphabetical order - as it should be! I have been loading for several years. I only do handgun rounds and I work on a single stage press. I could buy a progressive but I don't want to. Reloading is a hobby. I enjoy the time I spend at the press and am able to load more than we shoot so I am currently content. Who knows if that will continue, but it's the case now.

I use an RCBS Uniflow powder measure. I typically deprime and size a bunch of brass for later. I prime and flare them in batches of 100 per caliber and have that ready to load whenever the urge hits me. I charge each case individually and put them into a block. I typically weigh the charge at least once every 25 rounds (what fits in my block). I say at least, because I weigh every ten if I'm loading Unique or Trail Boss and every 25 if I'm loading W231, or something similar. The weights are virtually always well within my margin of error, but I check anyway. I visually inspect all of the charged cases when the block is full, then I seat the bullets and visually check the completed round before it goes into the ammo box.

It's a system that works well for me, but like I said earlier, I'm not producing a lot of rounds.
 
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