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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
Just purchased an XDS 9mm with the 3.3" barrel. I am pretty mechanically inclined and have disassembled and cleaned fishing reels and other tools in the past but handguns are foreign to me. I understand how to breakdown the gun and do routine maintenance but down the line I plan on stepping it up and doing a full cleaning. I was wondering what the best course of action would be in regards to purchasing a cleaning kit. Should I get a beginner kit like a hoppes or should I just piece a kit together on my own? If you think the latter is the best option could you please recommend the cleaning supplies / oil that cycles well with this firearm. Thanks!
 

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I don't know what the Hoppes kit costs nowadays, but personally I just buy separate things because you will run out of supplies eventually and buy them that way anyway. Get a decent pistol length cleaning rod, preferably made of fiber or plastic since it won't mar your gun and can take more abuse than the thin aluminum rods that come with the Hoppes kits. Then buy some brass brushes for your caliber, 9mm in this case. Get at least three. They will last awhile, but a worn one is good for mounting a patch on and pushing it through the bore to get it really clean. Try to buy a big bag (like 500-1000) cotton flannel patches. Some stores sell them that way, but you might want to check online. Even Amazon sells them. If you can't get a big bag locally right away, just buy 100 or so and order the big bag online, you will always find uses for them. While you are shopping, if you don't have some now, get a big box of CueTips cotton swabs you can dedicate to gun cleaning and put them in a small box along with the rest of your cleaning supplies. They are great for cleaning the rails and getting into small places with both cleaner and oil. Then get a good cleaning solution. Hoppes #9 is ok, but they also have a newer cleaner that is clear and the wife may not object to the smell like she might with the old #9, though some of us actually like that smell. There are other good cleaners. Most are very good so I won't mention any by name. Many of them will remove all oil on the gun, so wiping the gun down with a few drops of oil on a rag after cleaning is a good idea. Just put some oil back in the pores, don't soak it. As to oil, any synthetic based oil that you can apply by drop or with a cue tip is "good enough". Heck, even some thin synthetic motor oil is good. It will stay on the gun and not get gooey like petroleum based oil will. It is not necessary to spend $5 per once for some "gun oil" that is basically the same stuff as synthetic motor oil. However, there are a lot of "specialty oils" that will do as a gun oil. I even like Ballistol as an all around oil and pretty decent cleaner. It is non-toxic and won't hurt wood, plastic, or metal parts. The only thing you have to watch out for is if you have a gun with engraving and gold or other metal inlays. Some products will remove such fancy inlay so for those of you that may have an engraved gun, always read the label first before buying or using that stuff.

I hope this helped.
 

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I pieced mine. I didn't like some of the cleaning tools in the Hoppe's kit and wanted others that weren't included.
 

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Welcome from Concord NC.
Watch some of the videos, you can get some great information and develop your own technique.
 

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I'd like to add a bore snake to that list and some harbor freight or equivalent dental tools. Good for scraping carbon. You don't need to dig into it hard. Just enough to loosen up the carbon. Also a brush (nylon bristles).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't know what the Hoppes kit costs nowadays, but personally I just buy separate things because you will run out of supplies eventually and buy them that way anyway. Get a decent pistol length cleaning rod, preferably made of fiber or plastic since it won't mar your gun and can take more abuse than the thin aluminum rods that come with the Hoppes kits. Then buy some brass brushes for your caliber, 9mm in this case. Get at least three. They will last awhile, but a worn one is good for mounting a patch on and pushing it through the bore to get it really clean. Try to buy a big bag (like 500-1000) cotton flannel patches. Some stores sell them that way, but you might want to check online. Even Amazon sells them. If you can't get a big bag locally right away, just buy 100 or so and order the big bag online, you will always find uses for them. While you are shopping, if you don't have some now, get a big box of CueTips cotton swabs you can dedicate to gun cleaning and put them in a small box along with the rest of your cleaning supplies. They are great for cleaning the rails and getting into small places with both cleaner and oil. Then get a good cleaning solution. Hoppes #9 is ok, but they also have a newer cleaner that is clear and the wife may not object to the smell like she might with the old #9, though some of us actually like that smell. There are other good cleaners. Most are very good so I won't mention any by name. Many of them will remove all oil on the gun, so wiping the gun down with a few drops of oil on a rag after cleaning is a good idea. Just put some oil back in the pores, don't soak it. As to oil, any synthetic based oil that you can apply by drop or with a cue tip is "good enough". Heck, even some thin synthetic motor oil is good. It will stay on the gun and not get gooey like petroleum based oil will. It is not necessary to spend $5 per once for some "gun oil" that is basically the same stuff as synthetic motor oil. However, there are a lot of "specialty oils" that will do as a gun oil. I even like Ballistol as an all around oil and pretty decent cleaner. It is non-toxic and won't hurt wood, plastic, or metal parts. The only thing you have to watch out for is if you have a gun with engraving and gold or other metal inlays. Some products will remove such fancy inlay so for those of you that may have an engraved gun, always read the label first before buying or using that stuff.

I hope this helped.
Appreciate the help! I was going to go with ballistol and hoppes cleaner. Seems pretty self explanatory.
 
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