Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I shot my 9mm for the first time a couple nights ago. I shot about 200 rounds from 10 feet to 50 feet. I kept a nice group for the most part, but 90% of my hits where a little high and to the left. I'm in the police academy and want to shoot better. Any tips on what I'm doing wrong? I'm practicing the grip and form that we were taught in class so the basics are covered. I'm not sure what I need to tweak to hit the center of the target. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
Many new shooters, particularly with the XDm seem to shoot low and left. In my experience this is due to two things, 1) jerking the trigger or squeezing the trigger to the left instead of straight back and 2) recoil anticipation (flinching). Since you are high and left, you are probably not flinching and you should concentrate on your trigger technique. I recomment engaging the trigger in the middle of the first pad of your finger (not the first crease!) and practice slowly pulling back in a motion that is parallel to the barrel. The first two joints of your finger are the only parts of your hand that should move. This may not be your problem, but I will tell you that it has fixed the shooting left problem for several people that I know.
Good Luck and keep practicing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Many new shooters, particularly with the XDm seem to shoot low and left. In my experience this is due to two things, 1) jerking the trigger or squeezing the trigger to the left instead of straight back and 2) recoil anticipation (flinching). Since you are high and left, you are probably not flinching and you should concentrate on your trigger technique. I recomment engaging the trigger in the middle of the first pad of your finger (not the first crease!) and practice slowly pulling back in a motion that is parallel to the barrel. The first two joints of your finger are the only parts of your hand that should move. This may not be your problem, but I will tell you that it has fixed the shooting left problem for several people that I know.
Good Luck and keep practicing.
I think you are spot on. I was thinking this may be my problem as well. I am using the pad of my finger, but I don't think I have the pull straight back yet. I'll work on it and let you know. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
make sure your support hand is keeping your shooting wrist locked in to the place with tension pulling back towards you. (isometric tension) otherwise the recoil coupled with your trigger pull (which most likely is not smooth enough) will cause your wrist to break just enough to throw the round that way. hope this helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,586 Posts
And it's not just XD's, I see the "low and left" on every pistol forum I haunt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I'm shooting high and left. I do pull back with my weak hand. I'm using all of the form that we were instructed to use although my stance is a mixture of the Weaver and Isosceles stance. My legs are bladed but my body is square with the target.

I was practicing my trigger pull yesterday in the house and I noticed that if I let up on my weak hand (pulling toward my body) a little that the sights stayed aligned better when the trigger was pulled. I'm not sure if not pulling so hard will help or not.

Tonight we shoot, but we are doing a lot of hip shooting and in the dark shooting so I'm not sure how well I'll be able to determine if these adjustments help. I will post the results.

Thanks for the tips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I am left handed and shoot High and right consistently (2" grouping at 7 yds just high and right by about 2-3" from COM). Once while at my local range my local range owner brought me a magazine full with ammo and asked me to shoot it, unknown to me it had 4 or so snap caps mixed in with the regular ammo. The first snap cap I came to showed the culprit right away, I would jerk to compensate for the anticipated recoil, as I went through the rounds by the 4th snap cap I was much more still in my shooting and the grouping had moved more towards COM. I still find myself drifting back upwards and right of my target as it's something I'm working on mentally overcoming as it's not a thought out action but a reactionary action, so every range trip (once a week) since then I'll have someone else load up a magazine with snap caps mixed in with live rounds to help me focus on steady trigger pull with no anticipation of recoil. Give this test a try and see how it works for you! Another at home drill I was recommended is to take a coin (I'd start with something wide like a nickel) and place it standing up on the top of the slide and practice squeezing the trigger while keeping the coin balanced on the slide. My range owner can place a dime on his front sight and dry fire his weapon repeatedly. Just a few things that may help.

Phillip
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I'm shooting high and left. I do pull back with my weak hand. I'm using all of the form that we were instructed to use although my stance is a mixture of the Weaver and Isosceles stance. My legs are bladed but my body is square with the target.

I was practicing my trigger pull yesterday in the house and I noticed that if I let up on my weak hand (pulling toward my body) a little that the sights stayed aligned better when the trigger was pulled. I'm not sure if not pulling so hard will help or not.

Tonight we shoot, but we are doing a lot of hip shooting and in the dark shooting so I'm not sure how well I'll be able to determine if these adjustments help. I will post the results.

Thanks for the tips.
Yes it's not a tight ratcheted down tension, just a firm hold so that the wrist wont break. Pulling too hard will make your muscles start to shake which is never good.

maybe try a full isosceles stance. if only just for a more stable stance in general. the weaver and mod weaver arent quite as sturdy IMO.

And make sure it's always a surprise break in the trigger. You should know generally when the round will fire but not the exact moment (unless you've shot that specific model hundreds of times). trying to pull it at the exact moment the sight alignment is just right will throw you off, even if you think you're pulling back smoothly (personal experience there). Just keep a steady, general sight pic and be surprised when she fires.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,507 Posts
Try all 3 grip inserts. They can be used to tune the natural point of the gun. But, the XD line is a "6 O'clock" hold weapon so you would expect it to hit high if aiming for the bull directly.

To improve groupings, concentrate strongly on the front sight. Say "front sight" over and over as you gently depress the trigger and keep that sight picture rock solid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,108 Posts
I'm wondering what grip technique the OP is using. If he's using the old school combat grip. This may be causing him to hit high left because the gun will tend to recoil that way. Because there is less resistance with the support hand.

He should try the thumbs forward grip technique. You get equal resistance on both sides of the gun so it will tend to recoil more straight up and down.

I'm no pro. But this sure helped me big time! I can shoot rapid fire way way better and keep the groups tighter than ever before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Ask your range officer. They should be able to help with grip, stance etc.

Have fun at the academy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
I was recently playing with the manual, it said to use center sight allignment. Is that just a baseline to start with and see where you shoot. Or is that the way to aim my particular xdm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I was recently playing with the manual, it said to use center sight allignment. Is that just a baseline to start with and see where you shoot. Or is that the way to aim my particular xdm.
I just checked the manual for my XD9 Service and it says:

"Shooters may use a 'point of aim' sight picture at 25 yards. This means that, at 25 yards, the bullet should impact the target at the point visible at the top of the front sight. Shooters may also use a '6 o'clock' sight picture to strike the center of the target. Springfield Armory firearms are designed to use the '6 o'clock' sight picture at 25 yards. However, some firearms may shoot 'point of aim' at 25 yards depending on shooter and ammunition."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,108 Posts
The XDM point of aim is different than the XD. I have owned both and manual on the XDM is POA=POI whare as the regular XD is 6'Oclock.

However, at SD ranges it's not going to make much difference especially during rapid fire.

Your grip is key for rapid fire. there have been many threads on the proper thumbs forward grip.

If you practice it correctly. Pretty soon you will have no problems keeping pretty tight groups during rapid fire drills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,108 Posts

:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Ok thanx for clerifying the POA for me I have the xdm and just kind of glanced at the POA info didn't really read it so thanx.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top