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Purchased an XDM 9mm with the 3.8" barrel over the weekend.

Very impressed so far. Feels like an extension of my arm!

Couple questions, if I may:

* In the box were 2 pieces of filament(?) Can I assume they are for sight replacement?

* Is there a certain brand/type ammo that users have found to be most accurate?

Thank you in advance,
D
 

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Welcome to the group.... enjoy the the M. Great guns.

Filament, not sure ....

For ammo... they will fire just about everything. Between my two "M's" and thousands of rounds of everything from brass, nickle plated, steel and aluminum, the only failures encountered were those that were staged by an instructor during a class. During normal range time and during "regular" classes including both regular firing line and more active movement scenerios, the M's have been awesome with no failures of any sort. Any accuracy issues are mine, not the guns.

IMO, stay away from the really cheap steel stuff.... the price difference just isn't worth the higher wear and tear. I run aluminum all the time and brass, as well as quality defense ammo, with no problems.

Again, welcome and enjoy the group here!
 
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Welcome, @71dale -

The biggest thing you'll want to understand is that "tolerance stacking" is a real thing. Unique guns - meaning "your" SPECIFIC AND UNIQUE 3.8-inch, the one you have in your hands and whose ATF Form 4473 has your signature on it with the matching serial number. Not my 3.8-inch (I have two3.8 Compacts ;)). Not your brother-in-law's 3.8-inch XDm. Not the one that your instructor owns. Just yours, the one you have in your hands.

It's unique because despite the fact that the gun is mass-produced using state-of-the-art modern machinery and built within exacting tolerances, it's just that, tolerances. And the same kind of tolerances are in-play for any ammo that you may choose as well.

And those tolerances can and will "stack."

Because of this real-world phenomenon of tolerance-stacking, a unique gun may just decide to up and not "like" one or two specific makes/models of ammo.

For example, my Kahr PM9 goes longer before stoppages with Speer GDHP 147 gr. than Federal HST 147 gr. Meanwhile, my Ruger SR9c simply will not feed Cor-Bon 115 gr. +P DPX.

Note that all of these are highly regarded premium defensive ammo.

Alternatively, one of my two XDm9 3.8 Compacts will lock up so tight that it has to be mortared free if I use once-fired "range pickup" AE 115 gr. brass to induce stoppages (so that I can practice remediation in real-time). Similarly, one of my two 4.5-inch XDm9s tends to fail to cycle its slide the full distance and will not reliably strip an incoming cartridge from the mag when I feed it Magtech 115. gr. range-fodder (which is actually very highly regarded range-fodder).

For the time being, don't buy large quantities of any one particular type of ammo just yet. Instead, divest - buy small amounts (one box of 20 or 50) of many different types, so that if you do happen upon one that doesn't work as well, you can make a note of it so that you (1) don't buy it again and (2) save the rest of what you do have specifically so that you can train stoppages/malfunctions (if that's your desire). Usually, you'll see your gun/ammo mis-match start misbehaving within the first dozen - if not the first 3 or 4 - rounds fired, so all it really takes is just one box to test.

As an aside, this kind of tolerance-stacking can also induce weirdness where it comes to "performance" of the ammo.

When my buddy completed his Roland Special build, we were both somewhat worried about the supposed ammo-finickiness of that setup (the Roland Special is a Glock 19 which has some specific enhancements grafted on to it, including a muzzle compensator and slide-mounted micro-red-dot optic, it's these additions, as well as the oftentimes resultant need to use a different recoil spring in the gun to insure proper cycling/function that can cause the gun to be picky about ammo).

To insure that we wouldn't waste a range trip, I brought out with me sixteen (16) different makes/models of factory ammo - both el-cheapo range-fodder as well as premium defensive/duty cartridges - to give the gun both some good exercise as well as to log some data for ourselves.

To our astonishment, the gun performed just about the same with 15 of the 16 different 9x19 cartridges - everything from 115 gr. to 147 gr., standard pressure and +P. At the 22 yard line (we were limited to that distance based on the range, typically, we'd have taken things out to the 25 yard line for this kind of vetting), everything was coming in well within the black on a B8 repair center, and my buddy wasn't even taking his time with the shots. :D

The only exception was 147 gr. aluminum-cased Blazer, which, for whatever reason, caused the gun to literally open its group size to double what we saw with any of the other ammo. The gun shot both 115 and 124 gr. variants of that same Blazer aluminum just fine, and it also shot various other 147 gr. ammo (including both Speer GDHP and Federal HST) just fine, too. Literally, everything was fist-sized with the exception of the 147 gr. Blazer aluminum, which became open-hand-sized. We even re-tested this ammo a few more times, just to be sure.

Only after you've found ammo which work well in your unique gun should you then buy larger quantities.

Besides, ammo is expensive right now. ;)

Finally, for me, I don't really care about range-fodder type ammo "shooting dirty."

The truth is that if you shoot enough, your gun is gonna get carbon fouling no matter how clean the ammo you use. In-reality, any service/duty/defensive-grade autopistol - like the XDm - should easily be able to function for hundreds upon hundreds of rounds without any type of rigorous cleaning or other maintenance. For the 3.8-inch XDm9, my personal experience has been that even with the "dirtiest shooting" range-fodder and under harsh conditions (sandy/dusty, with the gun actually having been on the ground for some reason and to thus have picked up actual debris - "New" XDm9 from Cleveland - POA/POI & magazine questions) and without any lubrication, you'll still be able to get 250 (if not more like 500) trouble-free cycles out of the gun before it starts to start to slow and then see stoppages, and that's with the gun completely dry (i.e. no lubricant). If you had kept the gun properly lubed to begin with and/or were able to add even just a single drop of lube to the barrel hood, that gun will literally keep churning along - to infinity - until you run out of magazines/ammo or you encounter an actual small-parts breakage. ;)

----

Here's some old post of mine that you may find useful, too, each address some portion of this "ammo" question of yours -

Newb in the house!

Better Ammo & Better Aim?
 

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Congratulations on the new gun.
What are you going to use it for?
That obviously will determine the ammo you test. Ball range ammo usually runs reliably regardless of brand. Sometimes hollow point ammo can be finicky.
I'd run some target ball ammo to see if the gun actually works and if the sights seem OK as they are.
Testing numerous kinds of premium defense ammo to the point where you determine they are reliable is expensive. For defense choose one or two hollow point rounds, more if the budget allows, and see if they shoot close to the point of aim. When you find one that shoot OK (it may be the first you try or not) put as many as you can afford through the gun to prove reliability.
 

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Welcome from Virginia!
 
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