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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently got an XDM 4.5 Bitone for Father's Day. I wanted the green and black, but I ended up with the bitone- and I love the way the stainless holds up to scratches.

I am originally a Glock guy. I carry a Glock 37/39 combo for work, and own a Glock 23 and 21. I have always enjoyed the simplicity of the Glock, but I wanted something different with the same simplicity and I really wanted a 9mm. I love the capacity of this gun. For me Glock is the handgun standard- this XDM is pretty damn good. It's expensive but good.

I always thought XDs were kinda gimmicky- what with all of the "free" accessories you pay for. Even after owning it, I still think that. The bold in your face marketing is kinda: meh. I love the feel of this gun in the hand, it's so slim no matter which backstrap, (I use the smallest backstrap). It looks and feels kinda 1911ish. Maybe I'm crazy.

One gimmick that I can't wrap my mind around is the need for a "cocked" indicator. There is no decocker, so why show if this gun is cocked, when there is also a loaded chamber indicator?

A loaded chamber indicator in and of itself would indicate whether or not the gun is cocked AND loaded. I can't conceive of any way for an XD/M to be loaded without the gun being cocked as a byproduct of loading a round into the chamber. Am I missing something?

This creates two indicators to check. Isn't this redundant?

The only thing I can think of is with a Glock, one can tell if the trigger can be pulled, because when the slide is cycled, the trigger moves forward inside the trigger guard. It seems there is little, (if any) trigger movement when the XDM's slide is cycled. The cocked indicator seems to show whether or not the gun is capable of dry firing while empty.

This doesn't take anything away from my experience. If I could carry this gun for work, I would. In fact, I can carry whatever I want off-duty, but this gun is my off-duty choice. It's inspiring knowing I have so much live ammo in one gun to defend myself and/or my family.

-MM1
 

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It can be cocked without a round in the chamber, the cocked indicator lets you know it's ready to fire (with or without a round).

Me, I pretty much forgot I have those indicators - I always consider my gun loaded and ready to fire.

If the indicator is not showing and the loaded chamber indicator is, that could alert you of a misfire, I suppose.
 

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The only other reason I can think of is a visible verification while holstered as you would not be able to see the top indicator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thunder71,

I know it can be cocked without a round in the chamber, but what's the need for an indicator to tell me it's going to go "click"?

Of course, "the way" is to treat every gun like it's loaded, but then we have these redundant indicators.

Of course, I know when the gun is loaded, because it goes from the safe to the holster, and back...loaded. However, I'm just talking in theory about the point of these two indicators.

thetravlor

I'm not a fanboy of either and I'm not saying you are either, but comparing an XDM to 1911/ H&K is kinda silly. This is a relatively new unestablished handgun that is comprable to a Glock in construction, technology, and designation as a striker fired pistol, yet marketedly pricier, in my area. I compare this gun to a Glock, not any 1911, Sig, or H&K.

Shepp3rd,

If the gun were holstered, it would show the cocked indicator, and it would tell you the least important part of the story.

I'm sorry for causing a bunch of ruckus as the new guy. I just can't believe no one can see where I'm coming from. Anyway, I'm enjoying these forums.

Mastermind1
 

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The cocked indicator and loader chamber indicator would come in handy in a dark situation if your caught with no light and also in the middle of the night when your woken up by either a thud are your spouses elbow. I have myself ran my finger across the cocked indicator through my shirt to ensure I was hot without having to draw. Before that I just considered it a tool I never really used.
 

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A loaded chamber indicator in and of itself would indicate whether or not the gun is cocked AND loaded. I can't conceive of any way for an XD/M to be loaded without the gun being cocked as a byproduct of loading a round into the chamber. Am I missing something?
it really is kind of redundant for experienced shooters. however if you're trying to teach someone who is new to guns in a dryfire/live fire environment, the cocked indicator would be useful in helping a new shooter know if they are pulling the slide far enough to the rear to cock the gun rather than making them guess why nothing's happening when they squeeze the trigger, they can plainly see that it is not cocked. a new shooter may not seat the mag properly so it would be possible to rack the slide and succeed in cocking it but fail to chamber a new round.

sometimes when you are unfamiliar with firearms it is best to have redundancy to help you get proficient before you move to a "less user friendly platform"
 

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That's weird, the Department of Redundancy Department and the Redundant department of Redundancy were sure they were BOTH needed.


It's all marketing, but there are maybe a couple rare situations where it might be useful. They do stretch the bounds of credibility, but we already are prepared for a highly unlikely need to defend ourselves so...



Uh...

I was going to write them down, but couldn't come up with any besides what was already written above.
 
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