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Discussion Starter #1
this is for me and others who are interested in reloading.

:NOTE: this is for pistol calibers .40 - .45

what is the "best" brand to go with? (i hate this question but i know some people want an answer)

what is a good starter set up? (please include: brand, single stage or progressive, and price from lowest to highest)

where is a good place to shop for reloading equipment?

what is a good book/manual to start off with?







any other info you guys add, i will edit into my post. remember, lets keep this just basic, for the starters.
 

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There is a book called "ABC's of Reloading" that's been recommended to me as a good place to start. I have ordered it, but haven't received it yet, so I can't comment directly. You can see that book various places, including here http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=738288

From what I understand, most folks that shoot competively or do a lot of reloading use Dillon presses, at least for handgun ammunition. There's a ton of great information on Brian Enos' website about the Dillon presses, and you can buy em at good prices there too. Check out http://www.brianenos.com/pages/dillon.html#which and I think you'll learn a lot.

Hope that helps,

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for you reply scott.

hmm... i thought that this might be an opportunity for the reloaders to help out the new guys, but i guess everyone is to worried about "what is the best ammo".... :roll:
 

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I'd like to help you out rooster but I only reload for 22-250. But if you wanted to stop over some time I can show you the BASICs of reloading. It all starts there. The only different's between single stage and progressive is the amount of ammo you can make per hour and of course the machines get a little more complicated. I also have a ton of reloading sites on my computer. Oh... You could also pick up a couple free AR15 mags at the same time.
 

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I don't have the "best" setup. It's just a setup. Single stage RCBS press. Nothing special. It's really time consuming, but it gets the job done. I'm looking to buy a new press here in the near future, and when I do, it'll be a Dillon 550B.

As for which reloading manual to use, I've got a Hornady manual and a Speer manual, both of which are kinda old. I use the Hornady manual because the loads are a bit more conservative in that one. I don't really like hotter loads anyway, because in my experience, there is such a thing as pushing a bullet too fast.

Hope this helps.
 

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Geez rooster give us a chance to respond,


I only now saw the post.

It depends on how much ammo you want to make. I would say if you are going to shoot 300-500 rounds a month a Dillon Square Deal would be fine. If more, a 550.... If over 1000 per month a 650.

Go with Dillon..

I've had Lees', both the 1000 and Loadmasters and they are POS.....I've had nothing but broken little plastic parts that failed when i really needed ammo for an upcoming match....I had to use someone elses press.

IF a part breaks on a Dillon, they send you one for free.... Not so with Lee.

Caliber conversions cost more on a dillon, but they are worth it. you can change your press in about 20-30 minutes to go from 40 to 45. That's what i do. I shoot mainly .40 (over 1500K) a month and about 500 45 per month. After the Lee's crapping out i bought the 650.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
bw77 said:
is it really that much cheaper to reload, or is it more of a hobby thing?
from what many people have told me..

"it doesnt save you money. it allows you to shoot twice as much for the same amount of money you normaly spend on ammo"
 

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I will either go with a Hornady Lock-n-Load AP or a Dillon 550B once I stop spending my reloading press money on more guns.
 

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I have a Dillon XL 650 and its one hell of a press! No problems with it at all and like mentioned earlier, Dillon has excelent customer service. It practically cost me a arm and a leg, but I dont regret making the purchase at all. If you can afford it I think its a great idea to buy high quality equipment the first time around. :wink:
 

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SLCDave said:
I will either go with a Hornady Lock-n-Load AP or a Dillon 550B once I stop spending my reloading press money on more guns.

Skip the hornady press. One of our club members has one and has constant high primer issues among other things. Dillon is probably the best bet to go, even though I havent set the money down for one yet either. Im in the same boat as you, keep spending my money on guns...or other reloading tools. Like a sinclair neck turner.

Progressive presses are the way to go if you are looking to make alot of rounds quickly. With the dillon it can make pretty consistent loads from what most of the club members say.

If you want to reload for rifle or want the best accuracy out of a pistol - single stage press, RCBS makes a good one for that. Currently this is what I have, but Im looking into the Dillon units also.
 

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I would take the NRA Reloading Course. Hook up with a friend so he can mentor and check your progress. I use an RCBS Pro 2000 press with Lock-out dies. I followed the previous course of action and within 3 months I was loading on a progressive for .40 & .45 and loading 100-200 rounds an hour. These rounds are completed, unlike using a single stage where you have partially reloaded cases all around. Once you learn to set up your dies you will be able to reload at a moments notice. You will need a tumbler, scale, good calipers, die holders, and shell plates. Have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
f4tweet said:
You will need a tumbler, scale, good calipers, die holders, and shell plates. Have fun.
all the items we need to get started....



RJT said:
Dillon all they way! They do cost more but they will last a lifetime. I have a 550B and it was a good investment. I load both rifle and pistol on it.
ok, so dillon seems to be the most popular...



mullanman said:
It depends on how much ammo you want to make. I would say if you are going to shoot 300-500 rounds a month a Dillon Square Deal would be fine. If more, a 550.... If over 1000 per month a 650.....


....IF a part breaks on a Dillon, they send you one for free.... Not so with Lee.

Caliber conversions cost more on a dillon, but they are worth it. you can change your press in about 20-30 minutes to go from 40 to 45. That's what i do. I shoot mainly .40 (over 1500K) a month and about 500 45 per month. After the Lee's crapping out i bought the 650.
^very good info...



anything else for anyone to add?




thanks for the replys guys, its helping a lot.
 

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On the Dillon 550B, if you have a quick change setup for each caliber, caliber conversions take <5 min if you do not need to switch primer sizes 10 if you do.

Case gauges are a very nice item to have as well.
Primer flip tray, get the Dillon its metal and is large enough for any primer package.

If you go with the Dillon do not buy caliber conversion kits for every caliber you plan to load. You can use some of the parts from each kit to make up a different caliber.
eg: 45 ACP and 9mm use the same shell plate. Why buy 2. They do not list the individual items on the web site but if you call they will sell you the individal items. (shell plates, powder funnels, buttons).

I just loaded 400 rounds (ran out of cleaned brass) of 45 ACP in about 1 hour. I dont regret spending the $ on a Dillon. It works great and is very consistant.

Happy loading
 
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