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I paid 439 for a bi tone xd 9mm with 2 15 round magazines and the lock. I have yet to shoot it though, The first gun i ever shot was only a few weeks ago and that was a glock 17. I chose the xd because I liked how they look, because of the price, and how it felt in my hand. However the only complaint i have right now is that the cable lock that came with the gun is not working correctly.
I unlocked it, and tried to relock it but it seems to be slipping out when i fully turn the key. I dont know if i broke it because of trying to push the lock in or am i doing something wrong.

Anyways this is my first gun, so If any one has any tips on cleaning it then i would greatly appreciate it. I bought a pistol cleaning kit, but I want to be sure to keep rust of the gun as much as possible so what should I do for that?
Ill try to take and post pics later.
 

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Those cable locks are a joke anyway, get a lock box or a safe to keep it in for real security. And as posted above, keep it clean and oiled, wipe it down after handling and you should have no rust issues.
 

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Welcome to the forum Lonnie:

I would go to Wal-Mart or your favorite gunshop and get some supplies. First of all a good pistol cleaning kit (Rod, patches, oil, solvent). A silicone cloth to wipe down the outside and a can of gun scrubber is good too. Read the instructions for gun scrubber, it isnt' for all surfaces. You really should learn to take your XD apart and clean it. It's a good idea to clean a new pistol and it gets you familiar with the takedown procedure. 50 rounds is a pretty good start, but I would maybe get 2 more boxes of ammo and different brands if you can find them. Your pistol should shoot everything well, but trying some different brand may help you decide what works better in your gun. You should have 2 magazines from Springfield Armory already (if you bought new) and a 3rd isn't necessary right now. Most gun ranges will have eye and ear protection available for a small fee, but why pay it? I would get some ear muffs and shooting glasses at Walmart to save some hassles and you are going to shoot again arent you? The range will also sell you targets, but you can save money if you bring your own. Get some regular size targets, not the little tiny ones. You do not need a holster and most indoor ranges won't let you shoot from a holster anyways, so I wouldn't worry about a holster right now.
It would be a big help if you have a experienced shooting friend that can help you the first time to watch over things. If no one is available, you might want to ask someone at the range. Talk to the guys there and see if someone can give you some pointers. If you can go at a slow time, it might be better to get someone to help you. A bad time would be like at 12 in the afternoon on saturday for example.

Some pointers:
1. Put on your shooting glasses and then your ear protection. Indoor ranges have double doors, why? Well, you open one door, you step inside, close the door behind you and then open the door to the range. This way you don't let the sound of gunfire into the main store.
2. Take your spot at the "alley" you are to shoot in. Your pistol stays there and remains there until you are ready to leave. IF you have a problem (jam, misfire...). Your pistol remains pointed downrange and left there on the shelf in front of you. If you can't clear your problem, put your pistol down and get someone to help you. You do not walk around with your pistol for any reason. It remains there untill you are done shooting.
3. Your targets are clipped to the target holder and there is a switch that sends your targets downrange and back again. Since you are new, I would shoot at mid range, not too far and not too close. Some ranges also have lights that will illuminate your targets if it's too dark. There should be a light switch nearby.
4. Your spent brass will be hot and bounce around the place, make sure you don't have clothes that will catch a spent case. It's not a pleasant experience.
5. Most ranges won't let you pick up spent brass and you won't need them anyways for now. (Someday you may start reloading, but thats another subject altogether).

Here is what I do to clean my XD:

What I do:
1. Drop magazine:
2. Check chamber to make sure pistol is unloaded.
3. Dissasemble into major components. (follow instructions that came with your XD)
4. Dry brush all areas where gunk accumulates and wipe clean with a dry cloth.
5. Put some solvent on a good gun brush and wet scrub all dirty areas.
6. Spray gun scrubber to clear out the areas just brushed. (Wear eye protection)
7. Wipe down with another clean cloth.
8. Put some good quality oil on a Q-tip and oil areas that will benefit from lube. (Slide surfaces and areas where you can see that 2 surfaces are rubbing against each other, also lightly around the outside of the barrel.
9. Reassemble and work the slide a few times to spread the lube evenly.
10. Put a small amount of oil on a silicone cloth and wipe down the outer surfaces.
Thats about all I can think of for now. Ask those around you if you have any questions. Any decent, normal, courteous shooter should hopefully be around to help you. Size people up, find someone you will be sure to get some good instruction from. There are "Knuckle-Heads" at the range too and they can be the worst people to learn from. Be very safe, and you drop your magazine and check your chamber and check it again to be sure it is empty.
Have a good time and in time you will be just fine. Good luck, be safe and ask us many questions.

P/S. The bill is in the mail Wink
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Ported V-10 XD9 Service
Tactical XD9 in Basic Black
One of our fine members posted this for me when I first joined the forum. His name is Hobocircus. There's alot of information here - but I think you were looking for cleaning tips. I guess I don't know how new you are to guns, so if this is old news to you, just disregard it. It really helped me out though. It's like second nature now. Since then, I've picked up another XD and really enjoy both the guns and the hobby.

Good luck and congratulations on your new XD.
 

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Lonnie said:
5. Most ranges won't let you pick up spent brass and you won't need them anyways for now. (Someday you may start reloading, but thats another subject altogether).
While I recognize that this is a quote from advice that you previously received, policy varies from range to range (in my personal experience, most is not the case - YMMV). Both the indoor range that I currently frequent and the one I shot at 20 years ago considered it to be proper range etiquette to pick up brass at or behind the shooting station when finished shooting (with the option of either depositing it in a five gallon bucket provided by the range or taking your own brass with you). Any brass in front of the shooting station (downrange) stays where it lies for safety reasons (unless the range specifically allows people downrange during a cease fire).

In reference to MrSpillz photos, call it a pet peeve but I tend to get a little nervous when I see anything inside the trigger guard that doesn't belong there. Maybe it goes back to Treat every gun as if it is loaded.
 

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I remember you Lonnie :D

Glad to see some of my suggestions helped out :D

Shoot safe, and have fun while your at it.



 

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JD McDorce said:
Lonnie said:
5. Most ranges won't let you pick up spent brass and you won't need them anyways for now. (Someday you may start reloading, but thats another subject altogether).
While I recognize that this is a quote from advice that you previously received, policy varies from range to range (in my personal experience, most is not the case - YMMV). Both the indoor range that I currently frequent and the one I shot at 20 years ago considered it to be proper range etiquette to pick up brass at or behind the shooting station when finished shooting (with the option of either depositing it in a five gallon bucket provided by the range or taking your own brass with you). Any brass in front of the shooting station (downrange) stays where it lies for safety reasons (unless the range specifically allows people downrange during a cease fire).

In reference to MrSpillz photos, call it a pet peeve but I tend to get a little nervous when I see anything inside the trigger guard that doesn't belong there. Maybe it goes back to Treat every gun as if it is loaded.
My outdoor range REQUIRES that you pick up your brass and haul it away after a session. My indoor range requires you either pick it up or sweep it forward of the firing line. Usualy we take it home, no need to fuel their profits with our brass, their gun prices are steep enough.
 
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