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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got my XD45C 5". I'm a long-time rifle reloader but I've never reloaded for pistols. I've done a lot of reading and have my brass (Win.), powder (231), but can't decide on a bullet. This will be only for IDPA type target shooting. Any recommendations?
 

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I am using 230 grain jacked hollow points and 230 grain round nose bullets in front of 5.7 grains of Universal Clays.

YMMV
 

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I've used several different bullets and tend to stay with the Rainier Ballistics plated 200gr round nose bullets.
Being plated, they are much cleaner to shoot- both in and out of the gun.

Zero is also a very good FMJ bullet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info. It's making me realize that I need to start back in kindergarden. What's the diff. between lead and jacketed? Why would I pick one over the other for targets?
 

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I also use 200 grain cast lead RNFPs. Cost is not bad and very good accuracy. I use Oregon Trail Laser Cast bullets. Cabelas has them and if you take advantage of their holiday free shipping offers, the cost is even better.
 

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Thanks for the info. It's making me realize that I need to start back in kindergarden. What's the diff. between lead and jacketed? Why would I pick one over the other for targets?
Generally speaking threre are three bullet types; lead, jacketed, and plated.

Lead bullets can be cast by pouring melted lead into a form, or mould. They can also be formed by swaging lead wire into the desired shape. Swaged bullets are softest. Cast bullets can be very soft or pretty hard depending on the alloy, casting temp, quenching, etc. These bullets must be lubricated and have size and hardness matched to the application to avoid depositing lead in the barrel.

Jacketed bullets are usually a soft lead core swaged into a copper alloy (usually, copper plated mild steel jackets are used too) jacket. The jacket is much softer than the barrel steel and is self-lubricating. Jacketed bullets can typically be driven much faster than lead bullets. I keep saying typically or usually because there seems to be an exception to every rule.

Plated bullets are an in-between. A cast or swaged bullet has a coating of copper or copper alloy guilding material electrically plated onto its surface. These are normally loaded to the same velocities and pressures as cast bullets.

For shooting paper they all make the same size hole for any given caliber. Lead is the least expensive. Plated and jacketed bullets leave your gun easier to clean. Plated are cheaper than jacketed, but sometimes not by much. Lead bullets create more smoke when you shoot because of the lubricant burning off or vaporizing. Any quality bullet can be made to shoot well as long as it is a good fit for your gun.

Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Outstanding! Thanks for all the great info! As I said, I'm new to handgun reloading, but I'm starting to get my brain wrapped around this. I think my last question is what's the difference between round nose and flat nose? I'm guessing the round nose will feed more reliability and have a better B.C., so what's the advantage of a flat nose?
 
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