Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Alright guys, this was my 2nd time shooting the XD. And the first time I was keeping them on the paper at 25 feet but I was kinda all over the place. This time, I was shooting off to the left. Like seen in the attached picture.

Any idea on why or what is causing this? Thanks.:confused:

I cant find my camera now, but this is how the target looks. Keep in mind I was aiming for the "x".

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
226 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
271 Posts
A proper grip will help more than anything. With out the proper grip, you are just spinning your wheels. AMHIK. I have read a book that explains it all. The book is called "How to Become a Master Handgunner". After reading this book a couple of time and practicing dry firing a bunch, I ventured to the range. After I figured out how the grip should be according to the book and got comfortable with it, I was shooting the x box fairly often. But it took me about 125 round to get there.
The book is available from Amazon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
It looks like you blew out that guys kidney!

I'm in the same boat. I have about 500 rounds through my XD9 and I'm also shooting low and left. It's been getting better, so either I'm improving or the gun is "breaking in."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
I know one thing that helped me was to dry fire at home and watch the front site to see which way it was moving... but you know where you are shooting. Another thing that helped was I learned to grip the grip with only my middle and ring finger. The pinky should lay loosely on the bottom of the grip. Then pull straight back only moving your trigger finger with the pad/tip of your finger rather than the bend of your finger.

I'm not really doin so amazing myself but it has helped. Also, a bright small center target helps to pull in your groupings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
It's flinching in advance of the shot - anticipation, coupled with jerking the trigger. I have been using snap caps to cure my low left shots , too. Helps alot to see what happens when you get an unexpected misfire, and which way your hand moves. Mix a few snap caps amongst a few magazines, and mix em up so you don't know where the duds are.....let me know what you think after trying that....YMMV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,007 Posts
I wish I still had the link to some targets another forum member dave of deleware designed,it had the areas broke down and where you were hitting the most it told you the most likely reason, I also used to shoot low and to the left it means you are either jerking the trigger instead of pulling it straight back and/or your squeezing the grip too tight with your shooting hand the support hand it supposed to apply the pressure at least most. try this next time you shoot get a mag or two downrange to relax yourself,then when your relaxed enough adjust your grip (if you are right handed) you want to move your shooting hand slightly left on the grip shortening your trigger finger reach to where just the tip of your finger pulls the trigger back. now put your support hand back aim you front sight to where it covers only the bottom half of the bullseye and slowly squeeze the trigger back until the shot goes.. i did this on my last range trip and went from having an 8-9'' spread to a 2-3'' spread it feels a little weird in your hand holding the grip like that but i've been practicing a concealment draw(with the gun unloaded of course )at home now its beginning to feel natural to grip it that way automatically.

sorry for the length of this post i really hope it helps,oh and let us know if it does i know it helped me alot i started keyholing 5 shot groups into 2-3'' after i did this pretty consistantly and nearly all centered around or on the bullseye
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,050 Posts
It's flinching in advance of the shot - anticipation, coupled with jerking the trigger. I have been using snap caps to cure my low left shots , too. Helps alot to see what happens when you get an unexpected misfire, and which way your hand moves. Mix a few snap caps amongst a few magazines, and mix em up so you don't know where the duds are.....let me know what you think after trying that....YMMV
I've had the same problem and seen most everyone I've ever shot with do the same. I think everyone has. Mever's hit it on the head I think: Flinching. Combine that with improper grip and poor trigger control and you'll "ditch" the shot every time. This method ^^^ works wonders to show you what you're doing. It's impossible to see your own movements amid the recoil and BANG!!!! But when the gun only goes "click" you'll notice you're probably pushing the gun low and left when you pull the trigger. Try putting the pad of your finger (not the crease) on the trigger and jently and slowly prrreeeesssss it back until it goes "click" (make sure your gun is not loaded:shock:) and focus on what the front sight does during the full length of the pull. It helps to keep the muzzle a few inches off the wall or other textured surface, as this will show even the slightest movement. As others have said, just keep on practicing - dry practice helps a lot too. Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,795 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,210 Posts
Looking at your target I would suggest first that you consciously try using just the pad of your trigger finger instead of "hooking" the trigger.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,498 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
lol i need a left handed one
LH = exact opposite of RH

when you read your target, just look for the approiate box on the opposite site of the target from where your group is.

HTH
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top