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Discussion Starter #1
Just as the title says, I'm looking for some direction to help me practice when I go to the range with my XD9. I've been going 2-3 times a month now and every time I go I use 100-150 rounds or so and would like to think that I am a pretty good shot. However, now I'm starting to get frustrated as I don't think I'm getting much out of my range trips. I enjoy my time there but it's hard to tell if I'm making any progress.

I vary up the distance between 10-40 feet, but other than that I don't know what to do. So what do you guys do at the range? Anybody have a good series of firing exercises they go through when they go shooting? I want something that's going to help me become a better shot. And I'm not talking about dry firing at home or anything, I'm talking about when you're at the range using live ammo. Also, it would be nice if I could find a good consistent regimen as this would help me compare and track my progress. If they are any other threads here on the subject please just shoot me the link. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
bump for the night owls
 

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I alternate between several drills after I've finished the normal two handed stance. Tonight trip was all about practicing with one hand so I alternated between right and left hands since I tend to shoot low with both. Each time I also spend some time focusing really hard on trigger control. I would also recommend controlled pairs and then FTS drills. If your range allows it would be good to practice drawing from a holster since live fire makes it a little different from dry fire home drills. Firing from a sitting position is good and, if you are outside, there is always shooting on the move.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the ideas. I probably should do some one hand and left hand shooting. Unfortunately, they won't let you draw from a holster.
 

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I like to spend some time shooting two handed at 15 yds. This allows me to a. remind myself of the fundamentals, b. remind myself how the recoil and sound affect me, c. I get a feel for how she wants to operate for me (the gun), d. get loosened up. After that if I don't feel that I've got my fundamentals down I continue to practice those until I'm satisfied and then move on to shots from the alert (45 degree angle down/away from the body, or no lower than the range allows). A great drill is to print out sheets with 4 different shapes, each shape a different color (red square, green triangle, blue circle, black rectangle). Print out several sheets and vary the color of each shape and it's position on the sheet. Put the sheets up side by side and mark each with an easily identifiable number (1 through whatever). Have someone call out the color or shape and sheet number and see how quickly you can identify the target and fire a shot as accurately and safely as possible. Once you get more advanced you can do holster draws (after you dry run it about a thousand times, literally) or even pivots from side-front or back-front. Only if your range allows, though. For fun you could also put three "targets" no bigger than a cd: one on the groin area, one center mass and one in the "t box" of the head (about where the nose is). Observer says "go" and you shoot the bottom, middle and top targets, 2 rounds or less each. Whoever hits all of their targets first wins. As someone already said it's great to do offhanded shooting, and at home and with dummy rounds you can practice one handed slide manipulations to see if you can get the slide locked back or rack a round with just one hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I like to spend some time shooting two handed at 15 yds. This allows me to a. remind myself of the fundamentals, b. remind myself how the recoil and sound affect me, c. I get a feel for how she wants to operate for me (the gun), d. get loosened up. After that if I don't feel that I've got my fundamentals down I continue to practice those until I'm satisfied and then move on to shots from the alert (45 degree angle down/away from the body, or no lower than the range allows). A great drill is to print out sheets with 4 different shapes, each shape a different color (red square, green triangle, blue circle, black rectangle). Print out several sheets and vary the color of each shape and it's position on the sheet. Put the sheets up side by side and mark each with an easily identifiable number (1 through whatever). Have someone call out the color or shape and sheet number and see how quickly you can identify the target and fire a shot as accurately and safely as possible. Once you get more advanced you can do holster draws (after you dry run it about a thousand times, literally) or even pivots from side-front or back-front. Only if your range allows, though. For fun you could also put three "targets" no bigger than a cd: one on the groin area, one center mass and one in the "t box" of the head (about where the nose is). Observer says "go" and you shoot the bottom, middle and top targets, 2 rounds or less each. Whoever hits all of their targets first wins. As someone already said it's great to do offhanded shooting, and at home and with dummy rounds you can practice one handed slide manipulations to see if you can get the slide locked back or rack a round with just one hand.
Thanks for the very in depth response. Lots of good ideas!
 

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Find a club in your area that has NRA pistol shooting or IDPA or something similar. Competition is one of the best ways of training.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Good thread! Taking notes myself.:D
Yeah, I can't believe I didn't ask this question a long time ago. Bump for some more input. Keep it coming boys!
 

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I am assuming since you can't draw from a holster, you are also limited in movement (shooting in stalls for example). If you really want some great training, look for a range where you can draw/move, or like Krackels said, try to get into some IDPA. There are some great drills here: http://www.handgunlaw.us/documents/HandgunDrills.pdf but a lot of them require drawing, movement, multiple targets, etc...all of which is very crucial.
 

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MtJerry,
Great page!
Thanks!
 
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