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Discussion Starter #1
ok so im turnin 17 in less then a month, Augest 20th to be exact, and i just want to get a heads up and a really good revolver to start off with, now i know that I wont be able to purchase one since I'll only be 17, but this thread will be used for future refrence.
Now what I want is something that has about moderate recoil, seeing as im 6'1", 200 pounds so i know how to properly hold a gun haaha.
I want something that when and if somebody breaks into my house later down the road in a few years when i have a family and a kid I can point and shoot and not have to worry about them gettin back up, because the way i see it, If your dumb enough to come into MY house and try to do harm to ME AND MY FAMILY your already dead in my eyes so im going to unload on you.
I def want it to be a revolver, i dont have anything against pistols its just that Id prefer something...more manlier haahaha, because once that guy that broke in my house see's me in my underwear (as if thats not fear enough!! LOL) and pointing a 6" barrel at him that should be quite enough fear haha.
ok so thats what i want, now you guys help me out here haha
:):):)
:cool:

OHH!!! and also, what kinda permits would you have to get around and what not to LEGALLY own a sawn-off? just wondering?:-?
 

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My first gun purchase as an adult was a Smith and Wesson Model 686 with a 4" bbl in about 1978. I have NEVER regretted that. I have run literally tens of thousands of rounds through it. 38 spl through some VERY hot hand loads in 357 mag. It has NEVER mist a lick. I still have it and will NEVER sell it. You just can't go wrong with a revolver like that. You can shoot light 38 loads to learn trigger control and accuracy and you can carry hot loads (Hydroshocks) for protection.
 

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I would say a Ruger GP100 would be the best deal as far as bang for your buck in a new revolver. If you are thinking used, go with either a used GP100 or a used Ruger Security Six. Both guns are chambered in .357 mag. The Security Six had been out of production for years (replaced by GP100) but it is a solid gun, and decent examples can be found for around $300.
 

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I would say a Ruger GP100 would be the best deal as far as bang for your buck in a new revolver. If you are thinking used, go with either a used GP100 or a used Ruger Security Six. Both guns are chambered in .357 mag. The Security Six had been out of production for years (replaced by GP100) but it is a solid gun, and decent examples can be found for around $300.
I second this.

It's a great revolver all around.
 

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i have a gp 100 in 4 in it is a good gun my wife shoots it with 357 loads it has vary little recoil i like the 4in berral
 

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Discussion Starter #6
okie dokie, I will def look into these, they all sound like good guns :)
btw can somebody tell me what a hydroshock round is??? im clueless?
 

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Get a GP100. You will have it for a lifetime and it will serve you well.
 

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Something to think about. Revolvers don't have a reciprocating slide to help dampen and spread the recoil impulse over a longer time interval. As a result a revolver in 38 spl. will have recoil that is percieved to be about equal to a 9mm semi auto, despite the 9mm producing about 50% more muzzle energy.

With a revolver, if you want relatively mild recoil you either shoot a weaker caliber such as the 38 spl. or choose a heavier revolver.

Magnums. Understand this, the 357 Magnum and larger Magnums produce MORE power than almost any semi automatic caliber. That means the recoil will be enough that they aren't a good choice for a new shooter, you have to work you way up to shooting the Magnums if you want to be any good. In addition all of the Magnums are LOUD ENOUGH to produce some PERMANENT HEARING LOSS with just one shot in an enclosed space if you don't have hearing protection on. Quite simply, the Magnums are NOT a good choice for home protection, they are difficult to shoot well with, are prone to over penetration, and they will cause hearing loss in anyone present who doesn't have hearing protection in place.

How powerful are the Magnums, here is a brief rundown of common revolver and semi auto calibers.

Rev 38 spl. - 200 ft.lbs muzzle energy.
Rev 38 +P - 250 ft.lbs muzzle energy.
Semi 9mm - 300 ft.lbs muzzle energy.
Semi 40 S&W - 425-500 ft.lbs muzzle energy.
Semi 45 ACP - 415-500 ft.lbs muzzle energy.
Semi 10mm - 650-750 ft.lbs. muzzle energy.
Rev 357 Magnum - 600-750 ft.lbs. muzzle energy.
Rev 41 Magnum - 600-830 ft.lbs. muzzle energy.
Rev 44 Magnum - 1100-1500 ft.lbs. muzzle energy.
Rev 460 Magnum - 2000-2800 ft.lbs. muzzle energy.
Rev 500 Magnum - 2300-3000 ft.lbs. muzzle energy.

As you can see the most powerful semi auto caliber that is somewhat common is the 10mm and it's power is basically a match for the "baby" 357 Magnum.

I would advise that you look at the S&W model 686 with a 4 inch barrel. Loaded with 38 spl. it's a superb revolver for learning how to shoot well. Since you are young and healthy, when you think you are ready for it you can then load it up with some 357 Magnums and see what it feels like. BTW, you will be shocked by the increase in the noise and the increase in the recoil. However with enough time spent shooting 357 Magnums you'll learn to control it and may even procede to the biguns. However, I will warn you that all of the Magnums are flinch builders so if you do a lot of Magnum shooting you'll have to learn how to resolve flinching issues at some point.

As for Home Defense with a revolver, take if from someone who wakes up and goes to bed every single day with a ringing in his ears. Magnums are terrible for Home Defense. They are too damned loud and over penetration is a threat to not just someone inside your home it's also a threat to your neighbors. Personally, I like the wimpy old 38 spl. or the 40 S&W. BTW, I have a S&W model 610 revolver with a 6 1/2 inch barrel and it's basically as quiet as a 4 inch 38 spl. when loaded with the 40 S&W. Bad news is the 610 has been dropped from production again and they are currently running about 1200 dollars on Gunbroker. As for the 38 spl. while rather weak at only 200 ft.lbs. it will do the job very well if you shoot straight. That was very well demonstrated during about 80 years of Police use. If you have small childeren in the home you may even want to consider a 22 caliber revolver and just shoot that intruder through each eye. Quite simply, effective Home Defense isn't about shooting the most powerful gun, it's about being EFFECTIVE with whatever caliber you choose.
 

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GP100 or S&W 686 (I have both, and lean towards the 686; I do beleive it's a better gun...). Or, if you want to spend more, look at a S&W TRR8...8-shot .357 mag that uses moon clips for fast reloads.

A HydraShok is a type of bullet/defensive round made by Federal Cartridge. It's a bit dated in it's design, but unfortunately, the .357 mag hasn't been included in most of the premium ammo lines that have come out in the last few years. I'd use it over a few other bullet designs for SD...

And--take a class on defensive handgun use. You've got some serious misconceptions to unlearn.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
omgsh haha, yall are so informative, ESPECIALLY SCOOTER! i will def look into everything you guys have taken the time to write down here :) :) :) :) :)
 

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So, OP, you can effectively shoot a DA trigger and reload a cylinder under stress? I assume you can not, which is ok because you dont have the experience required to manipulate a revolver well. Revolvers seem like a simple choice, but in reality they are a learned skillset. Whatever you do, invest in alot of ammo and take a Defensive Handgun class oriented more towards revolvers.

I started handgun shooting with an old FIE 38spc snubnose, a "Lil Roscoe" if you will. Without any formal training it became a bear to manipulate quickly and accurately, so I switched to an XD9. After recieving training, I have stuck to semi's as my main defensive tool because they are simple and reliable (Glock and XD). But, recently I purchased a SW642 for a pocketgun as I needed a pistol to fill that roll. All these decisions came from years of practice, training, mistakes, and experience.
 

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I own 8 rev's & 6 auto's from Pythons to coonans and the lucky one that gets to sit next to the bed and the one I carry is Ruger 4'' stainless Gp 100 that I tunned and installed wolf springs in. glass bead finish at 35 pounds of air pressure . I state trooper told me 36 years ago when I pulled out my series 70 commander .45 to keep it simple and stay with a rev. So I went with a S & W .357 at the time for protection.I still loved and shot my auto's. Over the years I begin so see that keeping it simple Is better. No fail to feed- eject -extract No clearing jams of any kind. If you get a fail to fire with an auto oh oh..With a rev 99% of the time when you come back to that round it will go bang.And yes they are on the money about lots of ammo and training .Get lot's of speed loaders.
 

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Gotta cast my vote for the Ruger GP-161 as well. The 6 inch barrel seems to me to negate any real recoil from .357 magnum, and for home defense I have it loaded with .38 +P ammo, which has ZERO kick from such a heavy framed gun.

Plus, it is pretty boss.
 

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GP100 or S&W 686 (I have both, and lean towards the 686; I do beleive it's a better gun...). Or, if you want to spend more, look at a S&W TRR8...8-shot .357 mag that uses moon clips for fast reloads.

A HydraShok is a type of bullet/defensive round made by Federal Cartridge. It's a bit dated in it's design, but unfortunately, the .357 mag hasn't been included in most of the premium ammo lines that have come out in the last few years. I'd use it over a few other bullet designs for SD...

And--take a class on defensive handgun use. You've got some serious misconceptions to unlearn.
echoing this.

you'll likely find the Ruger cheaper. Find both and decide between the two though. Either will be with you for a loooooong time
 

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Discussion Starter #17
wow it really sounds like its gonna be the Gp100 from everything im hearing, but i will def keep this thread bookmarked untill the day comes for me to buy a revolver and en-roll in some classes, should be fun :D
 

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a good S&W model 60 or a ruger SP101 in 357 would be a good way to start
 

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a good S&W model 60 or a ruger SP101 in 357 would be a good way to start
No, it really wouldn't.

I've never really understood why people like to recommend short-barreled, small-gripped revolvers to new shooters--particularly in magnum flavors. They have a short sight radius, making them more difficult to aim. The small grip makes them harder to control, adding to the recoil impulse...which will be consdierable since it's a smaller, lighter-weight pistol. All of these things will add up to make what is usually a disappointing shooting experience...they won't hit their target, and it'll hurt.

Yeah, that sounds like fun.:rolleyes:

A full-sized, 4"+ barreled revolver in these calibers makes MUCH more sense for the neophyte.

Leave the snubs for more experienced shooters.
 
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