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I assume your bullets have a cannelure. Crimp until you deform the ridges the cannelure.
 

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I've been reloading a long time, and I don't have a clue what "deform the ridges the cannelure" means. Just set the crimp so that the mouth of the case is rolled into the cannelure.
 

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I've been reloading a long time, and I don't have a clue what "deform the ridges the cannelure" means. Just set the crimp so that the mouth of the case is rolled into the cannelure.
Then you should be good, it never hurts to pull a bullet and see if the brass left a ring all the way around the bullet. On my .44 mags, I crimp heavy, being a tube fed gun, I would crimp heavy as well.
 

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If your shaving brass off the case mouth, its too much, otherwise, you will be fine. A little common sense goes a long ways to be honest. There really is no true, right or wrong defined.
 

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how worried do I need to be about crimping too heavily? Thats why I asked
I use a Lee factory Crimp die, you can't really apply too much crimp but you can over adjust it and ruin it. Look down inside the die from the top as the crimp is applied, there are four segments that will come together as the crimp is applied. Adjust the die until the four segments just come together at full stroke. This will apply all of the crimp the die is capable of. The crimp will look like four equally spaced grooves pressed into the cannalure, very much like a factory crimp. These dies do not produce a rolled in crimp like traditional reloading dies do. The other reason I prefer the Lee factory crimp dies is because they are not as sensitive to over all case length to apply a consistant crimp and keep case pressures constant. Only $12 for easy to set up consistantly:D
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I use a Lee factory Crimp die, you can't really apply too much crimp but you can over adjust it and ruin it. Look down inside the die from the top as the crimp is applied, there are four segments that will come together as the crimp is applied. Adjust the die until the four segments just come together at full stroke. This will apply all of the crimp the die is capable of. The crimp will look like four equally spaced grooves pressed into the cannalure, very much like a factory crimp. These dies do not produce a rolled in crimp like traditional reloading dies do. The other reason I prefer the Lee factory crimp dies is because they are not as sensitive to over all case length to apply a consistant crimp and keep case pressures constant. Only $12 for easy to set up consistantly:D
Thanks, that helped
 
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