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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all im typing this to do just as the title says and share my story so it will help some random reader. I bought a glock 23 gen 4 and love it along side my xdm. Whats the first thing most guys you do when you get a new "toy"? Trick it out right. I begin evaluating the gun for what iI dont like then change it. Like most I hate the stock glock tigger. Well a combination of 2 parts( Mainly just one) and some bad loading practices caused me to have a ND. Yes im fine the only thing damaged is a night stand and my pride thank God! The 1 main part I want to warn others to STAY AWAY FROM is the Titanium (gold colored) striker safety plunger. The second part I want to advise others about are the adjustable triggers, the one with the set screw added on on the trigger itself and contacts the front of the trigger bar when adjusted. Despite finding in my brief research a couple bad reports of the plunger I bought it anyway thinking it will never happen. Ooh but it did.

So what happened? After careful analysis it was 3 things. Mistake #1 always being the human factor. While i was about to head out and put my gun on. I run the +1 in the chamber. Instead of loading from the mag like i should have i dropped it in the pipe to let the slide down slowly then tap it into battery... Mistake #2. I like a short pull on my triggers so I had previously (months before) over adjusted the set set screw. This in turn slightly depresses the safety plunger but I had no idea.

Mistake#3 I used that garbage titanium gold plunger. Even though the safety was half engaged the metal on those plungers are softer than the oem plunger. Over a period of 3-4 months the plunger became deformed from drying because I practice a lot. All in all the metal finally gave way enough to let the striker free and boom the gun goes off right when I smack the back of the slide.

Well what about the crusiform/seer safety you may ask? Since the trigger bar is one piece and I had the set screw so closely adjusted it was nothing to tap the slide and have that seer deactivate. Since then iv thrown away the aftermarket plunger and its back to oem. Let off tension on the screw and countlessly run checks on primed brass for dimples. As much as i hate the original trigger pull feel I may have to go back if i have any other issues.

I hope this helps someone.
 

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Glad you're ok. Glad the muzzle was pointed in a safe direction.
 

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Thanks for sharing.

Are those plungers really titanium or some kind of softer metal with a TiN coating?

Another thing is that when you take out the pre-travel, the little nub on the trigger bar that deactivates the striker safety needs to be re-formed. The stock shape is a straight ramp, and it needs to be reformed to a curved shape.
 

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Well...
Want my thoughts from a non-Glock user? Dropping the round in the chamber not a good idea in most autos. The ejector needs to slam around the rim of the chambered round. The bullet from the mag then slams into the primer of the loaded bullet when the slide is released. I think mechanically this is what caused the hole in the nightstand.
Rack one in via the magazine, eject the mag, and top it off. Best way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well im more glad it was pointed at the night stand then the floor. I felt some wood hit my foot and almost thought i blew my toe off
Thanks for sharing.

Are those plungers really titanium or some kind of softer metal with a TiN coating?

Another thing is that when you take out the pre-travel, the little nub on the trigger bar that deactivates the striker safety needs to be re-formed. The stock shape is a straight ramp, and it needs to be reformed to a curved shape.
The reading that i did on it said its a TiN coating for lubricity and "hardness" properties. Thats a ton of bologna!

I also didn't think about reshaping the plunger ramp. This will be a priority now that i know. Thanks for that bit of info!
 

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Well...
Want my thoughts from a non-Glock user? Dropping the round in the chamber not a good idea in most autos. The ejector needs to slam around the rim of the chambered round. The bullet from the mag then slams into the primer of the loaded bullet when the slide is released. I think mechanically this is what caused the hole in the nightstand.
Rack one in via the magazine, eject the mag, and top it off. Best way.
The ejector does not move. I think you meant extractor. Dropping one in the pipe to load shouldn't cause the round to go off. (Really not good for a 1911, but I digress.)

The slide can not close on a double feed, like you are describing. It can't even come close. It would be very obvious. I believe his diagnosis is correct.
 

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The reading that i did on it said its a TiN coating for lubricity and "hardness" properties. Thats a ton of bologna!

I also didn't think about reshaping the plunger ramp. This will be a priority now that i know. Thanks for that bit of info!
TiN is indeed a hard coating, but that's in reference to it's resistance to wear and abrasion. You could put a TiN coating on a marshmallow, but it would still be a squishy.

On a carry gun, I would recommend just getting a drop in connector and be done with it, but if you really got to have the pre-travel reduced, I would recommend getting something like the ZEV duty kit. All the re-shaping is already done, and it will be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The ejector does not move. I think you meant extractor. Dropping one in the pipe to load shouldn't cause the round to go off. (Really not good for a 1911, but I digress.)

The slide can not close on a double feed, like you are describing. It can't even come close. It would be very obvious. I believe his diagnosis is correct.
Thank you because i like many am a new glock user iv so i by no means know a ton of the science behind the glock even if it is simple
 

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Thanks for sharing your experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
TiN is indeed a hard coating, but that's in reference to it's resistance to wear and abrasion. You could put a TiN coating on a marshmallow, but it would still be a squishy.

On a carry gun, I would recommend just getting a drop in connector and be done with it, but if you really got to have the pre-travel reduced, I would recommend getting something like the ZEV duty kit. All the re-shaping is already done, and it will be safe.
If i have Any more problems i will putting it back in its stock configuration because i now believe you cant mix and match aftermarket parts like you would with a car. The glock is too simply and tolerances to loose or even tight in some areas. However i suppose getting a full kit tailored from the same manufacturer would have helped my situation as well.
 

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glock leg syndrome almost stuck again!!! glad you had the pistol pointed in a safe manner.
 

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Good information. Thanks
 
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