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Hello , greetings from montenegro.

I have a question about XDM 4.5 and I think that the best way to know the right answer , is here.

If I rack a slide gently , gun fails to come into battery.

If i slowly take and try to rack a slide for one inch gun fails to go into battery.

If i rack slide normaly , i have no issues.

Is this normal please?
 

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Patient: Doctor, it hurts when I raise my arm like this.

Doctor: Then don't raise your arm like that.

Any semi will not function well if slowly guide it back to battery. It slams back after each shot, an extremely quick action. Slingshot is best way to rack it.
 

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@romanson , I really hope you actually read my and the other members' replies here, and that this is not yet another trolling attempt:

XDM 4.5 9mm question about barrel

^ That thread got closed down by a Super Mod., so I hope that you're actually serious about learning, here.

I'm willing to give you another chance, but be warned....


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As the other members have said, the stoppage that you've incurred - what's commonly called "failure-to-battery" - is completely normal given your input (i.e. how you manipulated the weapon).

Virtually all modern semiauto pistols with a reciprocating slide that utilizes a hooked/tension extractor will, if the slide is allowed to ride forward "easy" towards battery, occasionally either not allow the case to properly slip under the extractor claw and thus cause a failure-to-battery.

Alternatively, excessive carbon fouling can also cause either the cartridge to fail to seat in chamber of the weapon or the slide's forward motion can simply become impeded by the built-up carbon.

Allowing the slide to fully return to battery under the power of the recoil spring - by fully retracting the slide towards you and then simply letting it fly forward - typically works to insure that the above stoppage scenarios do not play out. However, occasionally, if the gun is really *that* dirty (in my experience, it takes ~500 to 700 live-fire rounds, with absolutely no lubrication and with exposure to an extremely sandy/dirty environment), it may simply fail to reach battery under its own power.

In the following Facebook video, Chris Costa shows a couple of popular methods of how to reduce this very simple type of stoppage on both a modern striker-fire pistol (Glock which is analogous to your XDM) and the AR15:

Chris Costa on Facebook Watch

As others have noted above, your firearm needs the energy provided by the full travel/compression of its action spring (recoil spring) in order to properly achieve that portion of its cycle of operation (information below). You *can* elect to slowly/gently accomplish feeding/chambering/locking, but towards the end of this portion of the cycle, some form of external help is usually needed to accomplish those last steps - be it the need to physically force the slide/bolt (and carrier) home or to use a supplemental device like the forward assist on an AR15 to accomplish the same.

The cycle-of-operation is explained in this old - but excellent - US Army training video is worth the watch, to educate yourself on the inner workings of your firearm:


Hope this helps you understand a bit about not only why your actions elicited the stoppage you saw, but also that you are able to learn something about what's going on inside your gun. :)
 

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Op, what you’re doing is called riding the slide forward. Don’t do that. Let it spring forward under its own force. If the slide is forward, pull the slide back like a slingshot and release it- let it do the work. If the slide is already locked back like from shooting it empty, drop the used mag, insert the fresh one and either hit the slide release on the side, or pull back on the slide just enough for the lock to release and just let it go. Simple as that.


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