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I shoot the 5" .45 tactical using a thumbs forward grip like seems to be ever so popular. Recently I've begun putting my weak hand pointer finger on the ridged front of the trigger guard. I assumed that's WHY its ridged and I do shoot much better that way but I don't see any expert doing that. Am I dumb for doing so?
 

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If it works for you, go with it. Is it the recommended method? No. The finger on the triggerguard method fell out of favor a while back (mainly because lights started getting hung on pistols, and it was no longer always feasible), but some still use it.

Every edge that you can get...
 

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Not really as long as it works well for you.

There are accepted ways of holding the weapon that work for most shooters but that doesn't mean other ways won't work. Find a grip that you can train with and then train until you are accurate with it.
 

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I use that grip on my cougar. I can't on the p226. For some reason it's uncomfortable on it but very comfy on the cougar. I should stop this though. Grip should be the same with all my guns right?
 

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I was always taught (and in turn taught others when I was an NRA instructor) that your trigger hand is the most important. Your support hand can do pretty much anything you want, as long as it is comfortable and does its job, support. For most this is your tradition two handed grip, but modifying this to suit your personal needs and each individual firearm is perfectly ok. In other words, focus on the shooting hand, and do what feels right with the support hand... then adjust from them if needed.
 

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Hmm... I tried that grip a few times, but it seemed that inconsistent pressure from your index finger on the guard causes unwanted 'pulls' and accuracy problems
 

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Here is a good article on grip technique:

http://www.theshootingschool.org/articles/The_Combat_Grip.pdf

I have to strongly disagree that the support hand isn't important. It's critical to controlling the weapon and tracking the sights. I think you'll find the finger on the triggerguard works fine for shooting casually, but as you try to increase your shooting speed and/or work on more defensive shooting you'll find the extra tension will cause the sights to track poorly. There are a few pros that still use that method. Ultimately it's what works for you. I'm still making changes to my grip and experimenting with different things so there really is no right or wrong way. I would look at it more like what works and what doesn't. I think I remember Matt Mink shooting with his finger on the trigger guard.
 

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Here is a good article on grip technique:

http://www.theshootingschool.org/articles/The_Combat_Grip.pdf

I have to strongly disagree that the support hand isn't important. It's critical to controlling the weapon and tracking the sights. I think you'll find the finger on the triggerguard works fine for shooting casually, but as you try to increase your shooting speed and/or work on more defensive shooting you'll find the extra tension will cause the sights to track poorly. There are a few pros that still use that method. Ultimately it's what works for you. I'm still making changes to my grip and experimenting with different things so there really is no right or wrong way. I would look at it more like what works and what doesn't. I think I remember Matt Mink shooting with his finger on the trigger guard.
I didn't say it wasn't important, I simply pointed out your shooting hand is much more important, and modifying the support hand as needed isn't that big of a deal as long as it is comfortable and does the job, support. I also said adjust as needed, or in other words if a grip hurts your shooting, then change it.

I have seen first hand how big of a difference changing the support hand grip to something different than "the norm" can make for many shooters. I have seen unusual grip techniques, specifically with the support hand, allow for much improved shooting... for example, a very petite woman to shoot a .50 cal DE rapid fire with more accuracy than anyone else could at an NRA trainer workshop, and there were several state pistol champs at this event. I have also seen abnormal support hand techniques take very inconsistent shooters and make a world of difference.

Just because something isn't the "norm" doesn't mean it is bad. Accurate, quick shooting has a lot to do with comfort. If you have to keep readjusting your support hand and think about what you are doing because it is unnatural and uncomfortable, it is going to hurt your shooting. If the OP feels better with this grip (and from the sounds of it he does, and is shooting better using it) then there is nothing wrong with it. Consistency is much more vital, comfort is much more vital, good shooting hand technique is much more important, than your support hand gripping the firearm a set way (especially if that set way is uncomfortable, hurts your accuracy, and requires you to over think and over adjust to maintain that grip).
 

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Just be careful with this grip style when your stronghand finger isn't on the trigger. The purpose of putting the strongside finger straight along the rail and above the trigger is so it doesn't accidentaly come inside the trigger guard and into the trigger unexpectedly. I would think the same rule could possibly apply to the weak hand fingers as well. Not saying it will happen, just saying it is possible, especially if you are applying rearward pressure on the trigger guard with that finger.
 

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That grip doesn't work for me, but if it does for you, go for it.
 

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This PDF file is a great source of information. I struggle with the XD XD(M) when doing the thumbs forward and grip as high as possible, my thumb not being in the thumb grip notch, I tend to have my thumb above that, but not easily and consistent and sometimes my last round does not hold the slide open, thus I think I have pressure on the slide release.

Curious how others are doing this? Thumb in the notch or groove (area below the slide release) or above?

 

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This PDF file is a great source of information. I struggle with the XD XD(M) when doing the thumbs forward and grip as high as possible, my thumb not being in the thumb grip notch, I tend to have my thumb above that, but not easily and consistent and sometimes my last round does not hold the slide open, thus I think I have pressure on the slide release.

Curious how others are doing this? Thumb in the notch or grove (area below the slide release) or above?

You need to use a higher grip and rest your right hand thumb on top of your left hand thumb, slightly over from the slide enough to not hit the slide release...
 

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You need to use a higher grip and rest your right hand thumb on top of your left hand thumb, slightly over from the slide enough to not hit the slide release...

OK, I will stick to this and try to model this pic

 

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I use it to help control the recoil. It seems to work getting my whole hand on the grip. Accuracy increased for me after starting it and my dry fire practice cements the grip into muscle memory.
My carry and IDPA gun are both XDs. This works great for them.
 

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Placing your support hand finger ont he trigger guard can cause you to pull or push your shots during rapid fire.
 

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Finger on the trigger guard style tends to make me shoot low because I have a tendancy to pull down when that finger is out there. But, thats me. If it works for you, then good on ya.:mrgreen:
 
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