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I do apologize for re-creating “yet another” caliber war. I’ve read through too many over the years. My original question was sincere as I was surprised that Springfield was not even making 40sw.

However, I do appreciate the input and did not consider some of the benefits to diversity of keeping the 40.

I still might off-load my 4.5 XDM in the future, but will definitely keep the 5.25 as my competition shooter.

Thanks again.
As much as I like Springfield, they have a boutique, fashion-brand feel. They introduce an idea and if they don’t get immediate results they can it, morph the product line, and three months later do it all over again. It’s actually tiring to me. It’s gotten so bad with the lineup they show on their new website that I feel my love affair has a finite life. I have 13 SA firearms, for the record.
 

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I love my Hi Point Carbines. The wife has one in 9mm and I have one in 10mm. Great weapons with proper maintenance.
Maintenance.
I bore snake it clean inside the action blow it out with canned air. Little lube now and again.
I dont recall exactly but Ive had it for at least 15 yrs.

Shots like a dream.

Has a god awful amount of rounds down range.




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After 25 years of carrying .40 I have migrated back to .45 (well, I never completely left 45) and 9mm. But, I will always still like .40 and will always keep a few in the stable.
 

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I think having 9 / 40 / 45 available in both ammo and pistols - you can't go wrong. Who knows when / If 9mm or 45ACP can't be found - maybe only 40SW, I have learned to keep all 3 calibers for pistols. As a backup keeping 38 / 357 isn't a bad idea.
 

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Love my "cooler" as well, great brand !
8)
Dont have the cooler only a couple of there cool cups.
I think having 9 / 40 / 45 available in both ammo and pistols - you can't go wrong. Who knows when / If 9mm or 45ACP can't be found - maybe only 40SW, I have learned to keep all 3 calibers for pistols. As a backup keeping 38 / 357 isn't a bad idea.
I also have a 38/357 Ruger model 77 BAR.

And I reload 38/357 40 45 and 45LC.




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Maintenance.
I bore snake it clean inside the action blow it out with canned air. Little lube now and again.
I dont recall exactly but Ive had it for at least 15 yrs.

Shots like a dream.

Has a god awful amount of rounds down range.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Being a gunsmith wannabe, and thanks to You Tube and Mcarbo videos, I have completely taken my carbines down to fundamental parts. Even added a few MCarbo performance parts to bring recoil down on the 10mm and trigger springs to bring down the pressure. Easy once you do it a few times.
 

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The .40 S&W is not "dead". That said, it's popularity has been going downhill for a while now. The reason is because it was basically a solution to a non existent problem. But in the 90's it was Smith & Wesson's biggest money maker. A Cliff Notes version of the rise and fall of the .40 S&W is as follows:

1.) The FBI Miami shootout occurred on April 11, 1986. Resulting in 2 FBI Agents killed, and 5 others wounded.

2.) In order to improve it's weaponry, the FBI quickly made the change to the then new 10 MM Auto cartridge. Along with the large framed, heavy S&W Model 1006 auto pistols that fired it.

3.) They quickly discovered that several agents, (in particular women agents), could not handle the gun well, and several were having difficulty qualifying with it because of it's size, weight, and recoil.

4.) The FBI then went to Federal, and asked them to produce a reduced power load to help cut recoil, and in the process increase control. Federal then introduced the lower powered, "FBI 10 MM Load". By doing so the FBI, along with Federal, managed to create the worst of everything. An under powered load in too big and heavy of a pistol.

5.) While all of this was going on, Smith & Wesson was sitting on the sidelines watching all of it, and they came up with a brilliant, $$$"solution"$$$. They discovered they could shorten the 10 MM case by .100, and call it the .40 Smith & Wesson. This round gave better paper ballistics then a 9 MM at the time, and could be built on existing 9 MM frame pistols. It was also very easy for police and law enforcement agents to control.

6.) Everyone and their brother started producing and selling .40 S&W pistols. And many in law enforcement and the civilian market thought it was the best thing to come along since Monday Night Football, and 3 men in the booth. Sales took off.

7.) While all of this was taking place in the 90's and well into the new millennium, modern self defense pistol ammunition was improving drastically across the board. With better, more positively expanding bullets, that improved the 9 MM's performance to much higher levels. With less recoil and wear than what the .40 S&W offered. Any minor "advantage" the .40 S&W may have had, was quickly negated by vastly improved 9 MM ammunition

8.) The result of all of this was the .40 S&W slowly fell from grace, while the 9 MM once again began to rise back as the premier caliber for law enforcement.

9.) The final nail in the .40 S&W coffin was when the FBI made the decision to change back to the 9 MM in 2015. Pretty much admitting in the process the .40 S&W did not produce the results they had originally hoped for.

It's not that the .40 S&W was a "bad" cartridge. It's not. Or that there was anything "wrong" with it per say. There isn't. It is just as I said, a solution to a non existent problem. Or perhaps more accurately, a solution to a problem the FBI managed to create for themselves. But that Smith & Wesson was able to brilliantly capitalize on from a financial standpoint.
 

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The .40 S&W is not "dead". That said, it's popularity has been going downhill for a while now. The reason is because it was basically a solution to a non existent problem. But in the 90's it was Smith & Wesson's biggest money maker. A Cliff Notes version of the rise and fall of the .40 S&W is as follows:

1.) The FBI Miami shootout occurred on April 11, 1986. Resulting in 2 FBI Agents killed, and 5 others wounded.

2.) In order to improve it's weaponry, the FBI quickly made the change to the then new 10 MM Auto cartridge. Along with the large framed, heavy S&W Model 1006 auto pistols that fired it.

3.) They quickly discovered that several agents, (in particular women agents), could not handle the gun well, and several were having difficulty qualifying with it because of it's size, weight, and recoil.

4.) The FBI then went to Federal, and asked them to produce a reduced power load to help cut recoil, and in the process increase control. Federal then introduced the lower powered, "FBI 10 MM Load". By doing so the FBI, along with Federal, managed to create the worst of everything. An under powered load in too big and heavy of a pistol.

5.) While all of this was going on, Smith & Wesson was sitting on the sidelines watching all of it, and they came up with a brilliant, $$$"solution"$$$. They discovered they could shorten the 10 MM case by .100, and call it the .40 Smith & Wesson. This round gave better paper ballistics then a 9 MM at the time, and could be built on existing 9 MM frame pistols. It was also very easy for police and law enforcement agents to control.

6.) Everyone and their brother started producing and selling .40 S&W pistols. And many in law enforcement and the civilian market thought it was the best thing to come along since Monday Night Football, and 3 men in the booth. Sales took off.

7.) While all of this was taking place in the 90's and well into the new millennium, modern self defense pistol ammunition was improving drastically across the board. With better, more positively expanding bullets, that improved the 9 MM's performance to much higher levels. With less recoil and wear than what the .40 S&W offered. Any minor "advantage" the .40 S&W may have had, was quickly negated by vastly improved 9 MM ammunition

8.) The result of all of this was the .40 S&W slowly fell from grace, while the 9 MM once again began to rise back as the premier caliber for law enforcement.

9.) The final nail in the .40 S&W coffin was when the FBI made the decision to change back to the 9 MM in 2015. Pretty much admitting in the process the .40 S&W did not produce the results they had originally hoped for.

It's not that the .40 S&W was a "bad" cartridge. It's not. Or that there was anything "wrong" with it per say. There isn't. It is just as I said, a solution to a non existent problem. Or perhaps more accurately, a solution to a problem the FBI managed to create for themselves. But that Smith & Wesson was able to brilliantly capitalize on from a financial standpoint.
A few inaccuracies in your version.

2) FBI never used the 1006. They issued the 1076, mostly, and a few 1086’s.

3) is apocryphal. A couple of agents had problems qualifying with the 1076, and were switched to the 1086 and qualified.

4) Also apocryphal. The 180gr @ 975fps load was always the FBI's chosen loading for the 10mm. They never issued, or considered issuing, the full power Norma loads.

5) Olin-Winchester had already developed the round in the early 1980’s, but didn’t think it would be commercially viable until S&W approached them.

10mm Handguns and the FBI | Gun Digest
 

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I don't thinks so, it's all I've carried and used for the last 25 years and have zero interest in any other caliber honestly. It does everything I want and need it to do in my XD's. However I am looking at other guns now with RMR's and don't understand Springfield Arms not having a XD capable of mounting one in their line so I'm looking at Sig P320's to replace my XD's.
 

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I find funny is all the 10mm fans and 40 haters are often the same people.

But the two are closely related.




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I would say the primary reason 10 MM was dropped in favor of the 40 S&W was to reduce the circumference of the grip so people (men or women) with smaller hands could more easily grip the gun, power was the same as was round capacity.

The 40 is a compromise between the 9 MM's capacity and the big bore of a 45. The 40 had a advantage over the 45 in the higher pressure offered a little flatter shooting.

A bigger entrance hole will rarely get smaller, modern bullets do expand, but they expand in proportion to caliber and speed. I think that 9 and 40 have the extra speed over the 45 to ensure better expansion. Personally I will shoot +P, but not +P+ in a 9, so that makes my 9 carry round (Underwood 125 Gold Dot +P) slower than my carry 40 round (Underwood 155 XTP)

I carry most calibers now and then, but out and about it is 40 that usually gets the nod
 

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Why I LOL at the 40 haters who then tout the mighty 10mm.




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There’s a pretty substantial difference in velocity, though...usually a 20% or greater gain in 10mm.

It’s like comparing .38 special and .357 Magnum....

Or 10mm and .41 Magnum.
 
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