Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I like my XDm but the grip seems too slim. I had an extra Hogue grip sleeve laying around and put it on and now my XDm feels perfect. The only thing is it covers up and deactivates the grip safety. I don't really see an issue since the Glock and S&W M&P both have a trigger that is close to the XDm's and they don't have a grip safety. I only use this gun for the range and competition. I know pachmahr makes a grip sleeve that keeps the safety intact but it doesn't seem to have much of a palm swell which is what I need.

What do you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,540 Posts
You should be fine. Like you said it would not be the first gun to only have a trigger safety.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,470 Posts
Some have also trimmed the area on the sleeve to keep the grip safety.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,922 Posts
Your gun, but if it was mine, I'd be in the trim it crowd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
So I've been assuming that when you draw or reholster the XDm, you should keep off the grip safety. Is that correct?

What I've been doing while practicing the draw is wrap my middle, ring, and pinkie fingers around the grip, indexing my trigger finger over the holster so when I draw it indexes to the frame, and place my thumb behind the rear sights, then pull up to clear the holster. Then when I pivot, that's when I bring the thumb around and therefore press the grip safety. On reholstering, I basically reverse the process and move my thumb onto the rear sights just before the pivot back into the reholstering position, there by coming off the grip safety.

That seems to be the natural way to do it, I'm just wondering if that's how everybody does it or if there's a better way.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,790 Posts
So I've been assuming that when you draw or reholster the XDm, you should keep off the grip safety. Is that correct?

What I've been doing while practicing the draw is wrap my middle, ring, and pinkie fingers around the grip, indexing my trigger finger over the holster so when I draw it indexes to the frame, and place my thumb behind the rear sights, then pull up to clear the holster. Then when I pivot, that's when I bring the thumb around and therefore press the grip safety. On reholstering, I basically reverse the process and move my thumb onto the rear sights just before the pivot back into the reholstering position, there by coming off the grip safety.

That seems to be the natural way to do it, I'm just wondering if that's how everybody does it or if there's a better way.

I was always taught to get a proper grip BEFORE yanking the pistol from the holster. What you just described sounds like a droped pistol waiting to happen when you need to least drop it........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,595 Posts
So I've been assuming that when you draw or reholster the XDm, you should keep off the grip safety. Is that correct?

What I've been doing while practicing the draw is wrap my middle, ring, and pinkie fingers around the grip, indexing my trigger finger over the holster so when I draw it indexes to the frame, and place my thumb behind the rear sights, then pull up to clear the holster. Then when I pivot, that's when I bring the thumb around and therefore press the grip safety. On reholstering, I basically reverse the process and move my thumb onto the rear sights just before the pivot back into the reholstering position, there by coming off the grip safety.

That seems to be the natural way to do it, I'm just wondering if that's how everybody does it or if there's a better way.
I draw my pistol with the same grip I am shooting it with. Only time my thumb is on the sights like that is when I am walking from the bathroom to my bed or vise/versa when its not in a holster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
Yeah, those are both good points. I think I'll be reverting to a full grip. Having said that, it seems like the grip safety wouldn't really be a factor in preventing Glock leg, since it would be down when drawing or reholstering. Is that right or am I missing something?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,700 Posts
So I've been assuming that when you draw or reholster the XDm, you should keep off the grip safety. Is that correct?

What I've been doing while practicing the draw is wrap my middle, ring, and pinkie fingers around the grip, indexing my trigger finger over the holster so when I draw it indexes to the frame, and place my thumb behind the rear sights, then pull up to clear the holster. Then when I pivot, that's when I bring the thumb around and therefore press the grip safety. On reholstering, I basically reverse the process and move my thumb onto the rear sights just before the pivot back into the reholstering position, there by coming off the grip safety.

That seems to be the natural way to do it, I'm just wondering if that's how everybody does it or if there's a better way.
I do what you are describing when re-holstering, but NOT when drawing. Reasons:

  • when re-holstering, if you lift your thumb to back of slide it lifts the meaty part of your palm off the grip safety, so SHOULD prevent firing. Could prevent a discharge if trigger snags on clothing or holster. This is NOT an absolute! As always, NEVER rely on ANY safety - just like any mechanical device they can and WILL fail at the worst possible moment. Even with the extra margin of safety must still be careful when holstering, finger off trigger, ideally look down at holster to watch trigger guard pass cleanly into holster. Hard to imagine a circumstance where we would be in a hurry to holster, so extra time and caution does not cost us anything

  • another reason I like the thumb on back of slide is that it gives an extra pressure to firmly seat gun into a leather concealing holster, and make sure gun stays in battery. Mine is a Galco, nice and snug as it should be for proper retention

  • now on draw, you ARE in a hurry and you want an absolutely positive grip, three fingers and thumb full wrap, trigger finger indexed out stiff along the frame. In a fun game style shooting match such as USPSA or IDPA, last thing you want to do is drop gun - automatic DQ. I've seen a guy red faced once due to that. AND, worst case if the need should ever arise to draw in real life, the consequences of poor grip could be fatal. Also, in games or in real life you want proper presentation ready to get sights on target and bring finger to trigger after that. Don't want to be shifting grip while bringing sights to target.

  • palm off the grip on draw serves no purpose - the trigger can't snag on way out of holster, it is going in opposite direction. Make sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,742 Posts
I think a lot of glock leg comes from poor or worn holsters. When I draw its full grip, I want to be ready to use when I need too. My finger is also never on the trigger untill ready to pull. I also think kydex or a good solid leather holster will prevent "glock leg"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
I place my thumb on the end of the slide to reholster so the grip safety isn't depressed. That way if the trigger is snagged on clothes, etc., during the reholster I don't end up with Glock-leg. Push the pistol into the holster with the thumb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
palm off the grip on draw serves no purpose - the trigger can't snag on way out of holster, it is going in opposite direction. Make sense?
Oy, now that's so blindingly obvious I don't know how I missed it. :oops:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
My 2cents.... If you have a ND and someone gets hurt...the first thing and only thing they will focus on is the fact a safety has be disabled.
Find a way to keep all the safety's in good working order.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,790 Posts
I think a lot of glock leg comes from poor or worn holsters. When I draw its full grip, I want to be ready to use when I need too. My finger is also never on the trigger untill ready to pull. I also think kydex or a good solid leather holster will prevent "glock leg"
The only time I ever seen "glock leg" was with a 1911. Poor fool had his finger on the trigger.

Holsters rarely cause glock leg. Drawstrings with them spring loaded plastic bungee holders getting caught in the holster between the trigger and holster or poor choice of clothing causes the so called "glock leg". That can and will happen with any style of gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,854 Posts
So I've been assuming that when you draw or reholster the XDm, you should keep off the grip safety. Is that correct?
That's almost impossible, which is why the Springer also has a trigger safety. You should get a fighting grip when you grab the gun to draw. Anything less invites a dropped/fumbled gun or missed first shot, especially if you're in a BIG rush to get it out. The type of holster, cant, height, and placement should all contribute to getting a proper grip while the gun is still holstered. If not, you might want to rethink your carry options.

When my daily carry XD9SC had the stock trigger, I used a Paccy slip-on that covered the backstrap safety and didn't worry about it too much. Since I installed the PRP Ultimate trigger kit, I've cut the Paccy to expose the safety. Carrying a gun with a 3-3.5 pound trigger pull and only one safety operational made me a little nervous. My holster DOES cover the trigger, as it should, so it shouldn't be dangerous - but you know the word: Safety First!
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top