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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at the range today with some buddies for several hours and I shot maybe 300 rounds through my XD40SC.

I have an Insight X2 light on it and I noticed when I left that my light wouldn't turn on. The bulb had popped. I guess it happened from all the firing today. Is that normal?

I have a spare bulb, but now the interior is all dirty and I'm not sure how to clean it. I can't figure out if the lens will come off without breaking it.

Any ideas?
 

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Check with fresh batteries first. I have an XML that I THOUGHT had burnt out because it just went out all of a sudden, never really dimmed just gone. I got an extra bulb but when I installed fresh batteries before the bulb change it was fine < shrugg >
 

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I have tha insight M3. Never experienced bulbs breaking. It hasn't happened with any of my surefire either. I've had the bulbs burn out but never poped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Check with fresh batteries first. I have an XML that I THOUGHT had burnt out because it just went out all of a sudden, never really dimmed just gone. I got an extra bulb but when I installed fresh batteries before the bulb change it was fine < shrugg >
I took it apart and the bulb is definitely shattered. Little pieces fell out into my hands.

I just need to know how to get the interior of the lens clean before I put the new bulb in.
 

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Check with fresh batteries first. I have an XML that I THOUGHT had burnt out because it just went out all of a sudden, never really dimmed just gone. I got an extra bulb but when I installed fresh batteries before the bulb change it was fine < shrugg >
That's a single stage regulated circuit; the circuitry regulates the current to the bulb, obtaining maximum runtime from the battery with little or no change in output.

Many regulated flashlights have 2 stage regulation, meaning that once the battery can no longer support full output it reverts to a low "moon" mode for the remainder of the battery life. Obviously on a weapon light "moon mode" is pretty much useless though, so I'm guessing that's why it was omitted.
 

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That's a single stage regulated circuit; the circuitry regulates the current to the bulb, obtaining maximum runtime from the battery with little or no change in output.

Many regulated flashlights have 2 stage regulation, meaning that once the battery can no longer support full output it reverts to a low "moon" mode for the remainder of the battery life. Obviously on a weapon light "moon mode" is pretty much useless though, so I'm guessing that's why it was omitted.
Does all that apply to both LED and conventional bulb lights?
 

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Does all that apply to both LED and conventional bulb lights?
Yeah, a top quality incandescent light will often be regulated too, although many get away with simply using a lithium power source which has a flatter discharge curve than it's alkaline counterpart. Since most new flashlight technology is being funneled in the direction of the LED, older designs using incandescents are often direct drive. Newer designs of both LED and incandescent lights often incorporate regulation, a function particularly critical in weapon applications.
 
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