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Any good websites or books discussing 2 man and 5 or 6 man battlefield tactics, guerrilla tactics.
 

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I don't know specifically about your request but you can find official military training manuals in a lot of military surplus stores. I'd check those out. Great sources for first aid books, survival, all sorts of stuff.

You may also consider Sun Tzu's "The Art of War" which has all sorts of tactical information that can help get you in the right mindset of thinking about situations to help you accomplish goals... in and out of "combat" situations.
http://www.amazon.com/Art-War-Sun-Tzu/dp/1936594358/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1308621201&sr=8-2
 

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the Art of War is about mindset. that is far more important than learning a "proper" flanking maneuver or the like.

The only 2 man tactics you'll likely find are for police officers and for sniper/spotter pairs.
 

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I was hoping that agalindo was opening up his school on uber mall ninja skills. J/k

Seriously, I have to give the Art of War two thumbs up. You can also study Castro's right hand man during their revolution. I think his name was Che Guererra ir something like that. The basic premise that you do not fight toe to toe with you adversary. You do your best to deny him the things he needs until he is beaten.

As far as actual engagement, some marines I have talked with say that the main gunner keeps the enemy pinned while the assault squad takes them out with a flanking maneuver. I am sure Front Sight or some place like that could train you. It would be good if Mark would chime about his training school.
 

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Any good websites or books discussing 2 man and 5 or 6 man battlefield tactics, guerrilla tactics.
Getting ready for some intense rounds of paintball?

I don't endorse Sun Tzu if you want actual instructions on how to set up an L-shaped ambush as opposed to hearing crap like "Every battle is won before it is fought (insert gong sound)"

I recommend this:
Amazon.com: Ranger Handbook (9780873640442): U.S. Army: Books

Covers stuff like first aid and knots too. Sorry but I don't think it can be found online, it's cheap to buy though.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the info. I was watching Falling Skies Sunday and I realized that being prepared means, not just having the ammo, guns, and supplies but knowing how to fight a guerrilla war if need be, how to defend and how to attack in a coordinated way.
 

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I don't endorse Sun Tzu if you want actual instructions on how to set up an L-shaped ambush as opposed to hearing crap like "Every battle is won before it is fought (insert gong sound)"
Ah, but every battle is won ... or lost ... before it's fought (see signature). Tactics are important, yes, but as important (if not more so) are the emotional and mental aspects of the battle. If you're not just as emotionally and mentally prepared as you are tactically, all the tactics and tacticool gear in the world can't save you.
 

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It's a two edged sword, being prepared and not knowing the tactics is just as bad if not worse than knowing the tactics but not being prepared.
 

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Ah, but every battle is won ... or lost ... before it's fought (see signature). Tactics are important, yes, but as important (if not more so) are the emotional and mental aspects of the battle. If you're not just as emotionally and mentally prepared as you are tactically, all the tactics and tacticool gear in the world can't save you.
Agreed! You can be mentally tough and be so brave you run straight into machine gun fire and die or you can be trained in shoot, move, and communicate but be crapping yourself when the bullets fly and good luck flanking an enemy then!

How was falling skies? looks good, lots of hype. I want it to be good!
 

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Good show, good gun handling. Makes you think when you see 15 and 12 year old American kids fighting a guerrilla war on home soil.
 

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Good show, good gun handling. Makes you think when you see 15 and 12 year old American kids fighting a guerrilla war on home soil.
I have to know, did any of them yell "WOLVERINES!"?
 

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Naw.

It didn't flatter or make it cool, it was more of a fight to say alive, dirty cold hungry, fight to stay alive movie. Like I said it made you think.
 

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It's a two edged sword, being prepared and not knowing the tactics is just as bad if not worse than knowing the tactics but not being prepared.
Which is why I said:

Tactics are important, yes, but as important (if not more so) are the emotional and mental aspects of the battle.
 

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You could start by looking at past conflicts where there was a distinct underdog. A force fighting an opponent who was technologically more advanced or who far outnumbered the resistance fighters, the Mujahideen in the late 70's early 80's, Vietcong, French Resistance in WWII, American Revolution, French and Indian War, etc.

Someone mentioned Ernesto "Che" Guevara, (one of, if not my favorite revolutionary character), wrote a book entitled "Guerilla Warfare". The Cuban campaign in the Sierra Maestra's was a brilliant strategy using hit and run tactics while changing the local peasant population's political and economic views to the favor of the 26th of July Movement.

Basically you want to befriend the local populace for support, engage the enemy when and where they feel safe and then move quickly out of the area to somewhere else that fits the afore mentioned conditions and do the same over and over until it becomes too expensive in monies, lives and unpopular with their populace who will refuse to continue.

A guerilla front doesn't win by bloodshed they win by attrition and strategic political maneuvering. Just read your history and you can get all the info you desire.
 

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I under stand the tactics when it comes to evading, picking your fights, hit and run. I've read some of Che's book and others.
What I'm looking for is deploying your fighters, setting up defense. You know the specifics, this guy goes here, that one there, this one moves here that one goes there, type of strategies. Suppressing fire here while those flank this way etc...
 

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I under stand the tactics when it comes to evading, picking your fights, hit and run. I've read some of Che's book and others.
What I'm looking for is deploying your fighters, setting up defense. You know the specifics, this guy goes here, that one there, this one moves here that one goes there, type of strategies. Suppressing fire here while those flank this way etc...
All of those aspects are specific to the battlefield. If you've studied the basics, which it seems you have, understanding the successful application of basics comes through experience. No one can zip open your head and pour in specific deployments for your battlefield.

Here's what I would suggest:

1. Study the basics until they are second nature - there are plenty of online and printed resources for these.

2. Study your anticipated "battlefield" and overlay your understanding of the basics onto this battlefield.

3. Develop a strategy and a plan to accomplish your mission on said battlefield.

4. Recognize that once the lead starts flying, the initial plan will go to hell in a hand basket.

5. Develop secondary, tertiary, emergency and retreat plans.

6. Study the great battles of history. Try to understand how the basics were applied successfully and unsuccessfully.

7. Practice. Paintball is a good way to apply what you've learned.
 

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Plenty of lessons have been learned by the Haji's in Afghanistan: know how long it will take for Air or a reaction force to arrive and be gone before it gets on top of you, studying your enemy's tactics and how they conduct themselves and then exploit the weaknesses, counter intel, even small survivability tricks like wetting the ground in front of your firing position and not moving around at night if your opponent has NVD's.

I've always thought one of the best forces I've studied on hit and run tactics was the various light cavalry units in the Confederacy, those good ol' boys knew how to disrupt an opposing force's strategy.
 
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