Springfield XD Forum banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

I bought a Sun Oven earlier this year and even though I felt a little silly about it I went ahead and registered it on line. I got an email the other day that Paul is going to be in Utah giving free cooking seminars so I reserved Friday, 30 September 2011 with a start time of 7:00 pm. If anyone is interested in attending just send me a PM and I will give you the details. I'm near Hill AFB if that help you decide if you live close enough. Here is the email so that you will have as much information as I do right now:

Subject: UT SUN OVEN Seminars

As part of our ongoing effort to encourage the widespread use of SUN OVENS we have developed a SUN OVEN Cooking Essentials Seminar. I plan to be in Utah September 19 through 30 and would be happy to conduct a seminar at your location. This educational seminar can be conducted indoors so it can occur rain or shine, or in the evening. There is no charge for the SUN OVEN Cooking Essentials Seminar.

I am happy to come to a home for a handful of people, to a library, a park or to a church. (If you would like to use a church building, I am aware of the restrictions and will not be selling anything.)

The SUNOVEN Cooking Essentials Seminar generally takes 45 minutes and with questions usually lasts an hour to an hour and 15 minutes. I would be happy to come to your location to conduct a seminar.

Below please find a description of the seminar. Please let me know by phone or email if you would like to arrange a SUN OVEN Cooking Essentials Seminar while I am in Utah or if you have any questions.

Warmly yours,
Paul

SUN OVENS International, Inc.
39W835 Midan Drive
Elburn, IL 60119

Web site: www.sunoven.com
E-mail: [email protected]

Phone:630-208-7273
800-408-7919
Fax: 630-208-7386

The sun is a free gift from God!

SUN OVEN Cooking Essentials Seminar

An increasing number of families have obtained a SUN OVEN to have on hand in the event of an emergency and have been pleasantly surprised by the improved taste of sun cooked foods and the lifestyle advantages of cooking with the sun. Paul Munsen, of SUN OVENS International, will teach on how to harness the power of the sun to bake, boil and steam foods. He will show how practical and easy it is to cook in a SUN OVEN and discuss the many economic, health and environmental benefits of cooking with the sun.

Learn how to never have to worry about burning dinner again. Discover how to use a SUN OVEN to naturally dehydrate fruits and vegetables, and enhance winter sprouting. Find out how to reduce your utility bills and the amount of fuel you need to store for emergency preparedness while helping families in deforested developing countries around the world.


It looks to me like this could be a great experience and it would be even better to get to meet some more members of this truly awesome website. Besides, this way you will now know how to get to my house for the pancake social too. :cool:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30,890 Posts
David,
I suspect that oven would be of limited use in our neck of the woods! ;) But it sounds really cool, er, hot anyway!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,507 Posts
Utah get's down right *****. I'd like to request a mid to late winter report on effectiveness in cold weather. (the colder the better)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,920 Posts
David,
I suspect that oven would be of limited use in our neck of the woods! ;) But it sounds really cool, er, hot anyway!
Utah get's down right *****. I'd like to request a mid to late winter report on effectiveness in cold weather. (the colder the better)
It's all about sunlight and trapping energy ... It doesn't have to be hot outside.



A parabolic cooker ... Same principle !!!
And ibwaldo's design is actually better in such a climate than this type, because it traps heat.

They use stuff like ibwaldo's design in the Antarctic.

In a hot climate like Arizona, a well insulated design can reach 700 degrees, but the lesser quality ones can easily reach 500 degrees.

I had a materials class make a few of them last winter, and one group tried to cop out on the project.
They took a lamp shade, lined the inside with aluminum foil, and covered the top with saran wrap ... Using just that, they achieved 340 degrees in about an hour.

You do have to keep them aligned to the sun, though.

Uploader Comments (hipofalcon)
very nice its a global oven right? I made one and did a chicken stew in 5 hours I saw it hit 330 for the highest. Nice that it was under 20 f and they cook well. manufactured well with great seals. yum yum nice roast can I have a bite?
bg0821 2 years ago
No, this is NOT a Global Sun Oven. It's a home-built "60/30" oven made of plywood and cardboard. This oven has hit a high of 380F and actually did 360F in March of last year with the temps just around freezing. The Global oven is a good one to be sure, but even a good home-made unit will perform as well or better than the commercial units - this one cost less than $100 to build (and I have leftover Mylar and other parts for more ovens). Ken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,987 Posts
It's all about sunlight and trapping energy ... It doesn't have to be hot outside.
You still need plenty of sun light.

If its real cold, it wouldn't matter much because you'd need a fire to keep warm anyways.

I can see using one in areas that normally have cloud cover. Even if you can only cook 1 day in 4, its would be better than eating cold everyday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Everyone needs to keep in mind that you can still get sun burned on a cloudy day and in the middle of winter on a cold day. The cooking chamber is insulated and sealed so it should still be effective on less than ideal days. It might mean that you need to use it more like a slow cooker then an oven but I liked that fact that there is no maintenance or fuel that you need to keep on hand. I plan on trying it out this winter to see how well it works on a cold day. This could also be a fun project to try and design and build at home and see how well you do. The design is quite simple and should cost a lot less then this commercial design. You can also you this to pasteurize water for drinking if you had to. Here are some things to keep in mind that should answer some questions about sun ovens:

How does it work?
The black surfaces on the inside of the oven captures and transforms the sun's energy into a form that cannot escape the oven chamber. When a SUN OVEN® is focused in the sun, the interior of the oven is heated by the sun's energy. Direct and reflected sunlight enters the oven chamber through the glass door. It then turns to heat energy when it is absorbed by the black inner-shell and Levelator. This heat input causes the temperature inside the oven to rise until the heat loss of the oven is equal to the solar heat gain. The light energy absorbed by the oven's dark interior is converted into longer wavelength heat energy. Most of this longer-wavelength radiant energy can not pass back out through the glass, ensuring more efficient cooking.

What can I cook in a SUN OVEN®?
Anything you can cook in a conventional electric or gas oven can be cooked in a SUN OVEN®. You can bake, boil and steam using any of your favorite recipes.
What is the cooking temperature range?
The SUN OVEN® will reach temperatures of 360 to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. The oven will generally reach its maximum temperature as it is being preheated. The temperature will drop when food is placed in the chamber.

Will food prepared in a SUN OVEN® taste the same as food prepared in my conventional oven?
The food tastes much better! Solar cooking allows many of the natural flavors of food, which get baked out in conventional ovens, to remain. The slow, even rise in temperatures in a SUN OVEN® gives the complex carbohydrates time to break down into simple sugars allowing subtle natural flavors to emerge. Sun baked foods stay moist, the natural internal juices do not bake out, resulting in a superior, moist taste and much less shrinkage.

How long does it take?
Cooking times are close to the same as those in a conventional oven. Because the sun is often trying to run away and hide behind clouds, cooking times can vary. At times it may take a little longer. The factors that affect the cooking time are: the quality of the sunlight at the time you are cooking, the types and quantities of the food being cooked, and how often the oven is being refocused.

Does a SUN OVEN® require special pots and pans?
No, but dark, thin-walled pots with lids work best. Dark pots change the light from the sun into heat energy. Lids are important because they hold steam in the pot. If a lid is not used the steam will dissipate much of the heat. Shiny aluminum pots and pans cause light to be reflected out thereby reducing the oven's temperature. Glass casserole dishes with lids also work well. For baking cakes, breads, cookies, and pies, dark cookie sheets and baking tins work best.

Does food need to be stirred?
No. Stirring to prevent scorching is not required when cooking in a SUN OVEN® due to the fact that there are no hot spots. The temperature of the food rises evenly. It is almost impossible to burn food in a SUN OVEN®.

How difficult is it to focus a SUN OVEN®?
Focusing a SUN OVEN® is very easy. All that is required is to watch the shadows created by the oven. When the shadows are even on all sides, the cooker is directly focused. The built-in leveling leg on the back of the oven allows for easy tracking.

How often must a SUN OVEN® be refocused?
The need to refocus depends a great deal on what you are cooking, the time of day, and the temperature you wish to maintain. A good rule of thumb is to plan to readjust every 30 minutes to maintain maximum heat. At noon the sun is high in the sky and moves quickly past the maximum focus point, creating the need to refocus more often. Later in the day you will not need to refocus as often. The SUN OVEN® is equipped with a built in Levelator, which keeps food level and avoids spills while being refocused.

Many meals can be cooked without refocusing. SUN OVEN® users often will put their ovens outside, focused for the mid-day sun, with their dinner in it when they leave for work in the morning. As the sun moves overhead, the temperature in the Sun Oven's chamber slowly rises to a cooking level. As the sun passes, the food is kept warm and when they return from work they have a warm, sun-cooked dinner.

(Keep in mind food will not burn in a SUN OVEN® and that the chamber is extremely well insulated, allowing food to stay warm for hours.)
With the SUN OVEN® getting so hot, what is the risk of getting burned when using it?
The only parts that get hot are the oven chamber, the cooking pan, and the glass door. Proper care must be taken to use hot pads when opening the door and removing food. The entire exterior of the oven, including the reflectors, remains safe to touch.

How long will a SUN OVEN® last?
The estimated life of a SUN OVEN®is 20 + years. With proper care it should last a lifetime.

Do I need special recipes to cook in a SUN OVEN®?
The SUN OVEN® reaches temperatures comparable to that of conventional ovens, therefore no special recipes are required. A good rule of thumb is to add 10 to 15 minutes of cooking time for each time the oven door is opened.

Can I use a SUN OVEN® in the winter?
Yes. The most important factor in using a SUN OVEN®is the brightness of the day, NOT the outside air temperature. Often, a 40-degree, clear, low-humidity day will allow food to cook faster than a 100-degree day with high humidity. The SUN OVEN®has been used very successfully at the base camp of a Mt. Everest expedition where the temperatures are often well below zero. There are, however, more cooking hours available in the summer than in the winter. In the early summer, it is not unusual to cook from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM, whereas during the early winter, effective cooking is limited to 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,920 Posts
You still need plenty of sun light.

If its real cold, it wouldn't matter much because you'd need a fire to keep warm anyways.

I can see using one in areas that normally have cloud cover. Even if you can only cook 1 day in 4, its would be better than eating cold everyday.
Are you mixing things up between cooking and shelter, or ... What are you really trying to say ?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,920 Posts
Everyone needs to keep in mind that you can still get sun burned on a cloudy day and in the middle of winter on a cold day. The cooking chamber is insulated and sealed so it should still be effective on less than ideal days. It might mean that you need to use it more like a slow cooker then an oven but I liked that fact that there is no maintenance or fuel that you need to keep on hand. I plan on trying it out this winter to see how well it works on a cold day. This could also be a fun project to try and design and build at home and see how well you do. The design is quite simple and should cost a lot less then this commercial design. You can also you this to pasteurize water for drinking if you had to.
It will work just fine for you ... You already understand the way they operate, and realize it's not like an electric/gas oven ;)

Suggestion,
Because I don't think yours comes with a good way to keep it aligned with the Sun ... Get a small tube, and attach it to the side of the oven ... 1 inch dia. x 6 inches long seems to work well in my location.

Try to get it close to perpendicular with the glass, then just point the cooker at the sun, by using the tube to get a nice circular pattern of light to hit the ground, next to the cooker.

Re-align with the sun as necessary, so the circular pattern is recreated ... Keep in mind that a short tube, or larger diameter, will work better than the opposite.

Once you figure out a good length, you'll be able to walk outside, every 20-30 minutes, or so, and readjust the thing in second ... The time will need to be shorter if it's overcast.

If ya lived within 50 miles, I'd show up !!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,920 Posts
you can cook with the same fire that keeps you warm. If you have a fire warming your bones, there is no need for a solar oven.
And if there's nothing to burn ... What then ?

These things require nothing more than being built and used, properly ;)

Now head down the road of arguing that they won't fit in a backpack :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Suggestion,
Because I don't think yours comes with a good way to keep it aligned with the Sun ... Get a small tube, and attach it to the side of the oven ... 1 inch dia. x 6 inches long seems to work well in my location.

Try to get it close to perpendicular with the glass, then just point the cooker at the sun, by using the tube to get a nice circular pattern of light to hit the ground, next to the cooker.

Re-align with the sun as necessary, so the circular pattern is recreated ... Keep in mind that a short tube, or larger diameter, will work better than the opposite.

Once you figure out a good length, you'll be able to walk outside, every 20-30 minutes, or so, and readjust the thing in second ... The time will need to be shorter if it's overcast.

If ya lived within 50 miles, I'd show up !!!
That is an awesome idea, thanks and I will figure out how to incorporate that into this design!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,987 Posts
And if there's nothing to burn ... What then ?

These things require nothing more than being built and used, properly ;)

Now head down the road of arguing that they won't fit in a backpack :p
my whole point was it doesn't matter if it works in -20 weather or not. At that point you'll need a fire or you probably won't last long enough to enjoy you pot pie.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,920 Posts
my whole point was it doesn't matter if it works in -20 weather or not. At that point you'll need a fire or you probably won't last long enough to enjoy you pot pie.
That's what a good shelter is all about ;)

In a survival situation, which -20 would be, it's the first item to be taken care of.

And if you have to forage for more fuel, or your next meal, or make something toward survival, you can have something cooking, while you do those things.

Obviously, it's not a backpack item, but they do work ... So I gotta ask, why do you seem resistant to this type of cooking ?

Energy is a precious thing, during any survival operation ... YES ?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30,890 Posts
...In a survival situation, which -20 would be, it's the first item to be taken care of....
Maybe in Arizona -20°F is a "survival situation"... up by me and Groo it's simply called winter. ;)

The sun oven concept seems really neat... but we have quite a bit of cloud cover in winter, plus the sun sits pretty low off the horizon even at noon, so winter solar cooking is likely not very practical... for us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,987 Posts
That is my point. Most survival tools are specific to the environment, and the need for a solar oven is one of them. ibwaldo knows this general area. I think he'd agree that solar is not king in these parts.

Here wood is not scarce. It is very unlikely that I will ever run out of wood for cooking. Even if wild fires swept the area, there would still be plenty standing char and areas completely spared. Plenty of new trees would be sprouted up quite high before I ran out of standing dead wood. I would take a long term drastic climate shift to make a cooking fire unfeasable, and even then I could burn peat for years after the deadwood was gone.

-20 is not a freak occurance were it may dip down that low once or twice a winter for a couple hours at night. I thrive in the cold to the point were I generally wear shorts as long as the temp above 0F, but a few extra blankets and long underwear wont be enough for survival without some form of dependable heat in a shelter. That heat can also be used to cook.

A solar oven might be nice to have in the summer when you wouldn't want to bother to build a fire, but that is about as far as its usefulness would go around here.

As proof that I don't hate all things solar, I have been looking into and plan on building a solar kiln for drying lumber. That should work around here. A drying kiln is a far cry from an oven when it comes to the temperature required to work.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,920 Posts
Maybe in Arizona -20°F is a "survival situation"... up by me and Groo it's simply called winter. ;)

The sun oven concept seems really neat... but we have quite a bit of cloud cover in winter, plus the sun sits pretty low off the horizon even at noon, so winter solar cooking is likely not very practical... for us.
They've been used at the South Pole, and in States like Washington.

But you guys are entitled to reject them :cool:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30,890 Posts
They've been used at the South Pole, and in States like Washington.

But you guys are entitled to reject them :cool:
Used at the South Pole in what season? Summer, when the sun shines 24/7 for half the year? Doubt they got much use the other six months.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,920 Posts
Used at the South Pole in what season? Summer, when the sun shines 24/7 for half the year? Doubt they got much use the other six months.
I'm not trying to sell you anything ... Do some research :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30,890 Posts
I'm not trying to sell you anything ... Do some research :p
You underestimate me... I have been reading about these devices. I even looked through the Sunoven.com's website, and couldn't find anything about use in Antarctica, especially during the winter months... maybe you could point me in the right direction.

...How Do They Work?
To cook effectively, it's necessary to understand some of the science that makes solar cookers work, primarily that it's not the sun's heat that cooks the food, rather, the sun's ultraviolet rays.


The sun must be high in the sky for the ultraviolet radiation to penetrate the atmosphere. For example, from November through March, the sun is so low on the horizon that the light passes through more atmosphere, screening out most of the UV rays (that's why it's difficult to get a tan in winter). When the sun is overhead, the light rays pass through less atmosphere, and screen out less UV radiation.

Once the UV rays enter the cookers, they act as a filter/converter, letting the shorter UV light rays in and converting them to longer, infrared light rays that can't escape (like a one-way lobster trap).

Infrared radiation has the right energy to make molecules vibrate very vigorously, which causes the water, fat, and protein molecules in the food to vibrate very vigorously and get very hot.

In practice, this means that successful cooking requires a clear sky, with the sun at least 45 degrees or more above the horizon for a reasonable amount of time (depending on what you're cooking, from two to eight hours)....
As to my locale, I don't see an economic advantage for me... use would be limited and I have other fuel options; perhaps for you - with your more sunny climate, more southern locale, and greater discretionary income - the solar oven cooking makes a lot of sense.
On top of this, I have a very hard time embracing anything that Ed Begley, Jr. enthusiastically endorses!
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top