Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,163 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need help guys, Please hellp..

First I have no clue about reloading, second I hear there are two types, a single shell loader, or a reloader that does multiple shells in 1 session which makes it quicker. I have a 9mm and a 45, I would like to reload the shells as quick and as reliable as possible. I have heard good things about dillon and am pretty sure thats the brand id like to go with. So what all do I need? and how much is this setup going to set me back? I am very serious about doing this and whatever help you can start me out with would be absolutly great. If you know a place I can buy from that I can save some money with please let me know. Maybe give me some links to the exact machine you would get if you were me? Like I said, I want fast, reliable and the best price on one.. what do you got for me? :D

Also, dont focus on this question but do gun really blow up in your hand with reloads? Or is the only way for that to happen is if someone sticks too much powder in the shell? What other cons are there with reloading?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,022 Posts
Dillon has a starter kit. you can find it for sale over at BrianEnos.com. It contains about 85% of what you need to get started, besides components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,949 Posts
I'm in the learning stage myself. first thing... shell = shotgun , case = metalic like brass. Someone can probably tell me I'm wrong :)

From what I've read blowing up should only happen if you are not paying attention and screw something up. So thats simple enough. PAY ATTENTION. It's only explosives your working with.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
292 Posts
I've been reloading for more years than I can remember. I use both a single stage press (mostly for rifle loads) and a progressive press for all of my handgun loads. I use only RCBS equipment, but Dillon is the clear leader in this area and their equipment is good. No better than RCBS, just marketed better.

Reloading can be relaxing and rewarding because you now make up the loads that your guns like, so you should also then be able to shoot more accurately - not to mention save a load of dough!

Buy a good reloading manual - read it, then read it again. See if someone locally will allow you to watch over their shoulder while they reload. Take your time and do it right and you will get along just fine.

My son (a grown adult) watched me reload several times, then bought his own RCBS Rock Chucker and had me watch him the first time or two that he used it - now he's on his own and really enjoying that as an extension of his shooting hobby.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,473 Posts
Depending on your financial situation:p
Dillon Square deal b if funds are tight and you never plan to load rifle.
http://www.brianenos.com/store/dillon.sqdeal.html
309 for the press one set dies and a conversion of your choice Add another 80 for one more.
Dillon Xl650 bigger +case feeder and available powder check stations.
Min 750 to get you started.
http://www.brianenos.com/store/dillon.650.html
(That's what I want now)
Not that the square deal isn't a great machine but case feeder's are the cats meow.
Must have Powder scale,cailpers,Good reloading guide

Later you will want a tumbler,media seprator,Bullet puller.
Yes if you load pistol forget single stage progressive is the only way to roll unless you have a ton of extra time.Dillon has a minum sale price Brian is a great guy(I searched all over even Canada before I bought mine)
There is a starter kit from dillon I think it is scale calipers and a cover
unless you have a strong bolted down bench you will need a strong mount.

Ps I made over 6,000 rounds no doubles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,011 Posts
Yep...dillon.

easier to change calibers than most machines if needed, compared to Lee or RCBS. More trouble free, and hold their value better.

Plus a lifetime warrantly...a part breaks...call em up and they send you a new one free of charge and pay for shipping to you.. U cannot beat their customer service. You pay more, but you get more in the long run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,314 Posts
So say one goes out and buys a Dillon 550B. Would they need to buy anything else other than components to get started? I saw on the website (Dillonprecision.com) that they're listed by calibers. Does that mean they come with a set of dies? What does it cost to change dies on a 550? What do dies even cost? I've seen them around for ~30+ bucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
I have been reloading for a few decades. I have some kind of equipment from nearly every one of the manufacturers, including a few who are no longer around. Some I use more than others and much depends on what I am reloading. I am going to make a few suggestions for the starting reloader based on my experience. I am sure that I will open myself up for criticism, so take it for what it is worth. These are just my opinions and there are a lot of good opinions on this forum.

First, don’t start out with the most complex or the most expensive equipment out there. You can always buy more specialized and more expensive equipment later as you gain experience and better know what you want to do and where your interests lie.

Also, don’t buy the least expensive equipment you can get. A lot of it is junk, and some of it is just plain dangerous.

I would not suggest starting out with a “starter kit”. These usually contain a few good items and a few pieces of junk and you end up spending more money to replace the junk. It really is cheaper in the long run to buy each piece you need separately.

Basically, you want to start out with good, solid, reliable equipment that is capable of building good, safe, accurate ammo and that will last a life-time.

Here are my recommendation/opinions:

Buy a good cast, O-style, single-stage press. Good examples are the RCBS Rock Chucker or the Lyman Orange Crusher. There are other good single stage presses out there. They are accurate and you will always use it for something, even if you buy some other style of press later. These things last forever, so don’t overlook buying a used one. You can probably find a good used one on eBay or AuctionArms. I personally don’t like the C-style presses because they can flex and therefore may not be quite as accurate. You can always buy a more specialized and more expensive press later, such as a turret press, a multi-stage press, an “automated” press such as the Dillon 550B, or an in-line benchrest press such as the Sinclairs. They all have their advantages and disadvantages. The turret and multi-stage presses save time, but they also are not quite as accurate because they have more moving parts and looser tolerances. “Automated” presses such as the Dillon 550B are wondrous things and can crank out a lot of ammo in a short amount of time. They are also not quite as precise for the same reasons as multi-stage presses and they can’t be used for many of the larger rifle cartridges. In-line presses are incredibly precise, but they are not quite as rugged as the other types. I have many presses and many styles. I use all of them regularly. Again, to start I strongly suggest a cast, O-style, single-stage press.

I have hundreds of dies made by many manufactures, some of them no longer around. Most of them are very good dies. And many of them are for very specialized purposes. Some, I have modified for some special purpose. And a few I have made myself. In general, I have found that Lee make the least expensive dies and they are very precisely made. The only dies that I have ever found to be problematic (imprecise or out or line) were actually produced by one of the more expensive manufacturers. Dies will also last a lifetime if taken care of. You can also buy good used dies on eBay or AuctionArms. Even a used die that is a little rusted can be restored to excellent condition with some polishing compound on a cloth tied to a mandrel and placed in a drill. As a minimum, you need full length resizing dies and bullet seating dies. I suggest that you buy case mouth belling dies (sometimes these are combined with some other die functions, such as a powder dropping die. Factory crimp dies are really handy and I nearly always use them. However you can get a perfect roll crimp on any cartridge by backing out the bullet seater and crimping in a separate step. You can also get a perfect taper crimp on straight walled cases by removing the decapping pin from the resizing die and resizing the mouth of the case after the bullet is seated (you can do the same thing on a bottle-neck case but the result may not be as good because bottle necked resizing dies undersize the neck before the decapping/neck expanding pin properly resizes the neck). If you are loading bottle-necked cases, you will also need some kind of bullet lube. I strongly suggest Hornady’s resizing wax. It’s far less messy and less expensive in the long run. If you are resizing straight walled cases, I strongly suggest you buy carbide resizing dies so that you don’t have to use lube.

Buy a good scale. Do not try to save money on a scale! Cheap scales can be dangerously inaccurate. One or two grains too much powder in a pistol case that uses only a small powder charge can screw up a perfectly good gun, and a perfectly good person attached to the gun. The RCBS 505 is an example of a good scale. If you load thousands of pistol cartridges you may want to consider a powder dropper, but you will still need a good scale to regularly check the accuracy of the powder dropper. Electronic scales with attached electric powder dribblers are wondrous pieces of machinery, but I certainly would not start out with one (they aren’t cheap).

Buy yourself a decent dial caliper, and use it often. Electronic calipers are a bit easier to read, but they also cost a little more.

Buy a powder dribbler for trickling powder onto the scale, and a funnel for dumping powder in the case.

Those are the essentials and that’s all you really need to get started. If you enjoy reloading and you plan to keep it up, you will want to add more equipment and more tools. I suggest adding the following when you have the money and after you have a little experience:

A case tumbler for cleaning cases. A case trimmer (all the equipment manufacturers make them, you can even buy power trimmers). A case mouth deburring and chamfering tool. A primer pocket uniformer. A primer flipper for turning all the primers upright before you seat them. A hand primer (most presses come with a priming attachment).

From there, the sky’s the limit. There are tons of specialized equipment out there and if you really get hooked, you might even find yourself making your own tools.

I hope this helps. Have fun!

Alvin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,163 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Indeed that helps Alvin, thank you for taking the time to explain. I will use this thread as a reference for sure, Im sure I will have some quesitons so be prepared for some PMs from me ;) if you dont mind? If you rnot on here much can you drop me your email address?

I had a really nice scale that I sold off not long ago, I got it from a thief friend a long time ago. He had stolen it from a college and sold it to me for $20!!!! Now I have no scale and the money i got out of the scale is gone GRRR I should have kept it. This is what it was and Im not even sure if this woud work but it was dead on accurate..

http://www.labx.com/v2/adsearch/detail3.cfm?adnumb=262669

Maybe ill buy the same one off ebay and try to get a good deal on it..
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,479 Posts
beardman2 said:
I'm in the learning stage myself. first thing... shell = shotgun , case = metalic like brass. Someone can probably tell me I'm wrong :)

From what I've read blowing up should only happen if you are not paying attention and screw something up. So thats simple enough. PAY ATTENTION. It's only explosives your working with.
This can happen when reloading pistol. You can throw a double charge (twice as much powder as you should put in the case) or putting in 6 grains of powder when your max powder load is 4.5. Do pay attention to this. With rifle rounds you usually fill the case. A double charge here would usually way overfill the case. But once again if you put 40 grains of powder in when the max load is 37.5 KABOOM could happen.

Here's good place to check out.

http://www.reloadbench.com/main.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
That was definitely a very nice scale ... probably a little better than you need. You can expect to pay around $60 - $70 for a decent powder scale (maybe a little less if you shop around).

I check this forum at least two or three times a week so I am glad to help if I can.

You might want to check out the following sites. Google will turn up a lot more.

www.midwayusa.com
www.grafs.com
www.huntingtons.com
www.cabelas.com

Probably the best forum for reloading is www.accuratereloading.com.

Alvin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
433 Posts
How about Lee they make starter kits I started out with a turret press it's great and it comes with everything you need except the dies the kit only cost about $100 from midway usa and best of all a turret press is almost idiot proof. hope this helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,011 Posts
I'd have to disagree with Alvin.


A single stage press is not the way to go with a pistol reloader. Especially once you start shooting more and are going thru quantities of pistol ammo. Rifle....just fine.

You will quickly grow tired of changing dies and the low amount of volume of ammo you produce.......I speak from experience.

Get a progressive machine, good quality and go for it.

It is better to make at least 300 rounds in an hour, compared to 50 rounds for a single stage machine...

My .02
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I started with a Dillon 550b. I keep telling myself I'll buy a single stage. Every time I go to buy one I find something else to spend the money on. I currently reload the following: 9mm, .38/.357, .44 mag, .45 ACP, .30-05, .308 and .223
YMMV but I strongly suggest getting either the Lyman, Speer or Sierra manual and read the section on reloading in them three times. The Lyman is an excellant first reloading manual and has a ton of good info in it.

Do not take this to mean that a single stage is a waste of time or money. Its just not the way I did it. The learning curve was pretty steep but I also spent a couple of years reading, thinking and reading some more before taking the plunge. Initially you will not save money reloading. In the long run you probably won't either. Especially once kegs (8 lb. containers) of powder start looking more and more like a bargain since they last longer than a single session at the press! I can guarantee you will shoot much, much more than your friends who don't reload. That's the real benefit of reloading. That and developing custom rounds for individual guns that extract all their potential for accuracy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I need help guys, Please hellp..

First I have no clue about reloading, second I hear there are two types, a single shell loader, or a reloader that does multiple shells in 1 session which makes it quicker. I have a 9mm and a 45, I would like to reload the shells as quick and as reliable as possible. I have heard good things about dillon and am pretty sure thats the brand id like to go with. So what all do I need? and how much is this setup going to set me back? I am very serious about doing this and whatever help you can start me out with would be absolutly great. If you know a place I can buy from that I can save some money with please let me know. Maybe give me some links to the exact machine you would get if you were me? Like I said, I want fast, reliable and the best price on one.. what do you got for me? :D

Also, dont focus on this question but do gun really blow up in your hand with reloads? Or is the only way for that to happen is if someone sticks too much powder in the shell? What other cons are there with reloading?
Wow! I Wish you lived close. I'm 75yrs old and don't reload anymore. I have a whole room full of acquired reloading equipment. Got Dillon xl650 +, 4 rcbs, everything you would ever need. Will sell at auction when I die, or get given away.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top