Springfield XD Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently using MTM 's ds-750 digital scales. they are super accurate and have served me well. they are getting to the point now where I am constantly having to recalibrate them. they tend to drift off up to around .4grains at any given time. I calibrate using a 771.6 gr weight, this is how I check calibration after loading several rounds. But I'm sick of always having to check the scales so often.

What's a good reliable set that someone has used and enjoyed. I really would like to keep this under 100$ if not less.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,491 Posts
also would not recommend using a single weight to check calibration. that could be a problem as well. Use a check weight set, work from small all the way up to ensure correct readings. all you know right now is that your calibrations are accurate at 771.6gr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
oh I'm willing to if that's what it costs. just woulda liked to keep it under lol.

these mtm's have been great for 40$ scales. it's just getting annoying at this point w/ the constant calibrating. slows my process dramatically.

just point me in the right direction
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,879 Posts
m_f, I'm far more concerned about the accuracy of powder charges. For around $50 + shipping you can get an RCBS RC-130 like the one I've been using for the past 20 years. It's triple poised, magnetically dampened and the knife edges of the beam flange ride in agate bearings. It only weighs up to 131 grs. and why I bought it. Weigh bullets and cases, etc., on a digital, but for weighing powder charges why use a 505 or 1010 scale, or take the chance that a digital might be incorrect?

As far as using check weights, they should be similar in weight to the powder charges you're throwing or the bullets/cases you use, etc. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
20 years is a good life for scales. I will be looking into them ASAP. Thanks for the tip!!!

also the 771.6 gr weight is what the scales are preprogrammed to calibrate to. It is preset to recalibrate at that weight.

I've never looked for small weights like 10 and 20 grains, where would you find those????

I know my powder tray weighs exactly 44.3 grains so when that is off I usually recalibrate w/ the preprogrammed weight and then the tray is back on point.

I will keep this set I have now for weighing bullets , cases , etc.

Thanks for the info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
oh, I just saw those scales. I really prefer digital. I will spend what it takes for a good reliable set.

btw, I trickle so I am not solely using a digital scale. I'm still distributing by volume but just checking the drop with a digital scale.

I see the hornady -1500 for 36$. all my hornady tools have been great so far. anyone have any experience with their scales.

the look kina cheap. I like the larger more stable setup digitalis from what I'm seeing so far. they are all over 100$ that I've seen though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,473 Posts
M_F... Seriously man, rethink the scale thing. If there is only one piece of equipment you cannot have be bad it is your powder scale. 57K's recommendation is a good one, or for about $60 and change you can also get a Dillon balance. Neither of these are digital, but they will weigh accurately for many years. Frankly, I do not use a digital, I use a Dillon balance beam. I have tried some of the less expensive digitals and junked them in days. They are just not accurate and repeatable. None will weigh consistently to .1grn. If you really, absolutely, positively, no exceptions, no excuses, must have a digital then Dillon has some of those too, as does RCBS and others, but all of the good ones are going to cost over $100. If you are like me, you will likely spend more on your next order of bullets, primers, or powder than you will on even a top of the line digital, and the scale will last many years. Don't skimp here! Not here... not when it's that important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
M_F... Seriously man, rethink the scale thing. If there is only one piece of equipment you cannot have be bad it is your powder scale. 57K's recommendation is a good one. For about $60 and change you can also get a Dillon balance. Neither of these are digital, but they will weigh accurately for many years. If you really absolutely, positively, no exceptions, no excuses, must have a digital then Dillon has some of those too, as does RCBS and others, but all of the good ones are going to cost over $100. If you are like me, you will likely spend more on your next order of bullets, primers, or powder than you will on even a top of the line digital, and the scale will last many years. Don't skimp here! Not here... not when it's that important.
I feel ya. I won't skimp . I probably get a150$ rcbs or a dillon. is the magnetic really that accurate. mine seemed to much trouble , but it was a lee . too many more bullets and ill have a whole in the floor lol. I'm dead set on a nice set of scales. I know I'm gonna fork 200 out before it over with lol.
Consistency is my main concern. I don't make "plinking ammo" lol. ever. I always make rounds to what I want to shoot that session, find a few pet loads and mass produce.
Scales are a definite next.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,473 Posts
The Lee is junk. I got one for free and threw it out. No wonder you don't trust balance scales. I have both a Dillon and a 1010 (which is admittedly overkill for the stuff we weigh... but it works and will co-witness with the Dillon.). You are generally only going to change the set weight occasionally when you change your load or move your scale. If you put it somewhere where you can have it never move, like on a shelf above your loading bench, you will get the best accuracy without fiddling around. I find the digitals harder to use, inaccurate, and too touchy, but I don't have one of the premium ones either. Fred has used some of them, and if he recommends one, I would look into it. Otherwise, you can look some up on sites that sell them and read the user's feedback on them and see what might do for you. Brownells, Midway, Sinclair, and others have such feedback reviews on their pages and are good to look at whether or not you buy things from them.

PS... those suppliers sell small sets of test weights too. The one you used is WAYYYY too heavy for accuracy for the things we weigh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm looking at the dillon d-terminator. it's 150$.

the weight is preprogrammed into those scales to calibrate at 771.6 grains. wasn't my choice
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,879 Posts
JSG is exactly right! Don't base anything about a balance beam scale on LEE. The Safety Scale is junk and what my late B-I-L got with the Challenger kit, so I checked it out. When I gave up in frustration, I was pretty much ready to take a sledghammer to it!

Before I bought the RC-130, I bought a Dillon Eliminator (Olhaus). Unfortunately, I didn't get a good one and it just didn't want to zero. After I returned it for a refund I rethought the whole process and really wondered why I needed a 505 gr. scale, plus I already had a Lyman. I looked through the load data I have and the highest chargeweights of powder were for the .460 Weatherby Magnum and I don't plan to own one anytime soon. In fact, fredj388 is maybe the only guy here that loads for the serious dangerous game cartridges. 404 Jeffrey, IIRC. He'll tell you that if you're gonna use it a digital, it must be a premium version and the better ones start at around $150.

Since I had a 505 gr. scale, admittedly a lower priced Lyman, I decided to try the RC-130 because it has all of the best features of a 505 while only having 131 gr. capacity, but with 3 poises just as the better 505's have. If you go to Midway beware! Some of the reviews are not stellar and it might have something to do with the fact that whoever set up the RC-130 and took the pics, has the beam upside down where you'll see I've posted asking them to correct it.

Getting back to the Eliminator and the fact that JSG also checks against other scales to get the same weights. That's always a good idea and use checkweights when you can. With digitals like the FA I have, it has to be calibrated everytime it's used and the checkweight is 20 GRAMS, not GRAINS. Then it's consistently .2 - .5 grs. lower than my RC-130, throughout the RC-130's range. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,288 Posts
As some one who has worked in a lab for over 15 years and field science for 25. I have used a balance beam off and on longer then that. Stay away from balance beam type scales. Any balance beam has inherent in accuracies due to parallax. IF you know how to overcome this issue and the care of a balance beam they are fine. I love digital.
BTW here is a good digital for right at 100
RCBS RangeMaster 750 Electronic Powder Scale
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
I see the hornady -1500 for 36$. all my hornady tools have been great so far. anyone have any experience with their scales.
The GS-1500 is fine for a $35 scale This was my first digital scale, it came in the kit I bought so I did not specifically research it out. It's an OK scale but it would drift by .1 after it had settled--maybe that was the finally accurate reading. Anyway my biggest complaint was the auto power off. I got tired of turning it on every couple of minutes waiting for it to settle and tare. I also did not like battery only power.

Personally I'd bite the bullet and and spend a little more money and get a much better scale.

I ended up with the Lyman Accu-Touch 2000. It has a nice large lite display, both AC and battery operated. The auto power off (when in battery mode) is a reasonable 15 minutes. It comes with a trickler which mounts on the scale base, and it has two 1000 gram calibration weights. I've only had this for a couple of months, but so far I am very happy with it and its an improvement in every way over the GS-1500. Read Masseyman's review on Midway's site for some great tips.

I do have lots of Hornady equipment which is excellent and high quality, but this little GS-1500 scale is not one of them.

Other scales I considered are:
Dillion
RCBS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
The Gempro 250 is a nice little scale and they went up in price since I bought one. The A&D FX120i is a better one but they are over $500 now, it has the same 0.02 grain resolution as the Gempro but the FX120i is a force restoration scale and is less likely to drift but is a pain to trickle onto because of its size
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,879 Posts
As some one who has worked in a lab for over 15 years and field science for 25. I have used a balance beam off and on longer then that. Stay away from balance beam type scales. Any balance beam has inherent in accuracies due to parallax. IF you know how to overcome this issue and the care of a balance beam they are fine. I love digital.
BTW here is a good digital for right at 100
RCBS RangeMaster 750 Electronic Powder Scale

Parallax? Really? I appreciate your experience and all, but as someone who was trained on surveying instruments, level, theotolite and distance meters 30 years ago and has used them ever since, maybe that lends some perspective in relation to reading a balance beam scale from a couple of feet. If we're talking Rifle Scopes then maybe parallax has some relevance. Even 1/10th gr. error is so easy to spot that I'd probably see it 10' from the scale. Digital scales are NOT more accurate than balance beam, they're just more convenient and no scale should be trusted without testing with some form of checkweight relative to the powder charges that will be thrown. Kind of like the slide rule. Is a calculator more accurate? Not with engineers/scientists who took us into space and knew their way around a slide rule. Is the calculator more convenient? Easily, and computer programs are far easier to use than a calculator. Now we are graduating engineers and scientists in universities that don't even know their way around a scientific calculator. And, like precision measuring instruments, most are taking the path of convenience rather than learning how to use precision instruments, going to digital instead. Personally, nothing digital has a place for me in precision reloading. If my shooting partner hadn't have given me a very nice set of Mitutoyo dial calipers this past Christmas, I was looking at going back to a vernier caliper instead to replace my previous and worn out dial caliper. And Mics that can measure to 1/10,000" accuracy, well, you can trust a digital or you can learn to use a vernier scale. There's little doubt about which I'd choose and I've seen some fairly expensive digital calipers go squirrely.

Really, checkweights are all around us. Confirm that a .177", .204" or .224" rifle bullet weighs exactly on the money on several different scales and you have checkweights that cover a fairly broad range of typical powder charges from magnum handgun to magnum rifle. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,288 Posts
I agree with everything you say for an EXPERIENCED user. I also agree that analog devises can be read more accurately then an equal digital if you have EXPERIENCE. PUT for an novice (or in my case lazy) a digital device is easier to use and for that reason more accurate. It is hard to misread 1234.5 vs somewhere between 1234.0 and 1.235.0
Parallax? Really? I appreciate your experience and all, but as someone who was trained on surveying instruments, level, theotolite and distance meters 30 years ago and has used them ever since, maybe that lends some perspective in relation to reading a balance beam scale from a couple of feet. If we're talking Rifle Scopes then maybe parallax has some relevance. Even 1/10th gr. error is so easy to spot that I'd probably see it 10' from the scale. Digital scales are NOT more accurate than balance beam, they're just more convenient and no scale should be trusted without testing with some form of checkweight relative to the powder charges that will be thrown. Kind of like the slide rule. Is a calculator more accurate? Not with engineers/scientists who took us into space and knew their way around a slide rule. Is the calculator more convenient? Easily, and computer programs are far easier to use than a calculator. Now we are graduating engineers and scientists in universities that don't even know their way around a scientific calculator. And, like precision measuring instruments, most are taking the path of convenience rather than learning how to use precision instruments, going to digital instead. Personally, nothing digital has a place for me in precision reloading. If my shooting partner hadn't have given me a very nice set of Mitutoyo dial calipers this past Christmas, I was looking at going back to a vernier caliper instead to replace my previous and worn out dial caliper. And Mics that can measure to 1/10,000" accuracy, well, you can trust a digital or you can learn to use a vernier scale. There's little doubt about which I'd choose and I've seen some fairly expensive digital calipers go squirrely.

Really, checkweights are all around us. Confirm that a .177", .204" or .224" rifle bullet weighs exactly on the money on several different scales and you have checkweights that cover a fairly broad range of typical powder charges from magnum handgun to magnum rifle. ;)
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top