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Discussion Starter #1
So I was reading the stronghand version of the operator's manual for the HS2000. Of course own an XD40. There's a difference in the loading instructions between the HS2000 and the Springfield XD manual.

The HS2000 manual says to load the magazine while the slide is closed, then rack the slide to load the first round in the chamber.

Springfield suggests locking back the slide first, inserting the loaded magazine, and then close the slide.

Which is correct? Both? :?:
 

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You'll probably find it easier to seat the magazine with the slide open, but either method is acceptable.

Think about it: if you were in a shooting situation and ran out of ammo, you would reload with the slide back. If you knew you were about to run out of ammo and had a chance to reload before you did, in fact, run out, you would reload with the slide closed. Like I said, both methods are acceptable and valid.
 

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When I am shootign by myself I usualy ahve the gun locked open. If I am competing and it is a cold range then the slide is closed and the gun is in a holster until I am told to load and make ready. I use both methods depending on conditions/activity. Either oen is correct and I have not noticed any functional differences in doing either.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Seems to me that when loading with the slide closed, I need to push harder to get the magazine retained. And what about the striker? Should it be partially cocked or completely in?

I've always followed Springfield's manual but always wondered why I couldn't (but evidently can) load with a closed slide. I thought it was a quirk about the gun, and I didn't want to damage it either.
 

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If you carry with one in the pipe, then placing a round in the barrel, closing the slide, then inserting the magazine seems the best route. If I can walk with one in the chamber, and 15 in the mag, (or in the case of the .40 1 in the pipe and 12 in the magazine.. ) then why not have that extra round?)

Raymond
 

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Captain Ray said:
If you carry with one in the pipe, then placing a round in the barrel, closing the slide, then inserting the magazine seems the best route. If I can walk with one in the chamber, and 15 in the mag, (or in the case of the .40 1 in the pipe and 12 in the magazine.. ) then why not have that extra round?)

Raymond
I think it may be safer to get the first round chambered from the magazine, then taking the mag out and adding the final round into the magazine.

I don't remember where I heard this....not in basic, since we were taught to carry in condition 3 (it was before the Beretta era). But I know I learned it somewhere.

Also I am not that anxious to stick my fingers into an open breech.

I don't see where your method is really dangerous. Probably is not. I guess it's a psychological thing not wanting my fingers in a breech that can seemingly chop a finger off (certainly break a bone) when it isn't necessary. Certainly if the gun goes into battery you should be ok. But stripping a round off the top of the magazine seems like it would be more consistent. Could be my imagination again, but here too I somehow seem to remember being taught this.

Of course condition 1 seems scary also, but most people get used to that. But cocked and locked is a state of readiness...either you are or you are not. Chambering a round with your fingers is only optional since you can accomplish the same thing another (safer?) way.

Peace,
D.
 

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Captain Ray said:
If you carry with one in the pipe, then placing a round in the barrel, closing the slide, then inserting the magazine seems the best route. If I can walk with one in the chamber, and 15 in the mag, (or in the case of the .40 1 in the pipe and 12 in the magazine.. ) then why not have that extra round?)

Raymond
Not a great idea. The posibility of damage to the extractor is huge. I found that out the hard way. There is also the posibility of bending over the rim on the casing and the extractor not able to grab on it either. Loading from the mag is the only way you should chamber a round. This is not my humble opinion but also that of every autoloader manual I have ever read. If you feel you need that extra round, then drop the mag and top off. Just don't act like in the movies and cycle the slide again.
 

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It seems to me, that there was a discussion about this some time ago, and the process will not damage your extractor. Just like dry firing an XD will not damage the pistol.. where a 1911 might not do so well.

I could be wrong, but in hundreds if not a thousand magazines loads exactly this way, I have suffered no damage.

Raymond
 

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nogoa said:
Captain Ray said:
If you carry with one in the pipe, then placing a round in the barrel, closing the slide, then inserting the magazine seems the best route. If I can walk with one in the chamber, and 15 in the mag, (or in the case of the .40 1 in the pipe and 12 in the magazine.. ) then why not have that extra round?)

Raymond
Not a great idea. The posibility of damage to the extractor is huge. I found that out the hard way. There is also the posibility of bending over the rim on the casing and the extractor not able to grab on it either. Loading from the mag is the only way you should chamber a round. This is not my humble opinion but also that of every autoloader manual I have ever read. If you feel you need that extra round, then drop the mag and top off. Just don't act like in the movies and cycle the slide again.
You are mostly correct. Placing a round in the barrel and then letting the slide go forward is bad for the gun. The only guns that this can be done with no fear of damage are the Beretta 92/96 and the Taurus PT92/100 models. The standard method for loaded mag +1 carry accepted by professionals and taught at any respectable academy is to feed the first round from the magazine, remove magazine, top off magazine and finaly replace the now full magazine. Otherwise you are just asking for unnecessary wear and tear/dammage to your gun.
 

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Maybe you guys are right.. I have suffered no ill effects, but this is probably because I do not "slam" the slide home.. with a live round in the chamber I am uncmofortable relasing the slide lock, allowing the slide to "slam" into conditon one.. I just gently release the slide, then load the magazine.

There is no chance of ND the way I do it.. that is the most important thing.. No damage has occured thus far.. and that is a good thing. It seems like an uneccessery step though removing the magazine and topping it off.

Maybe I should re-think my process. I still don't see any convincing reason to change at this point though... I will have to ask around..

Raymond
 

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nogoa said:
Just don't act like in the movies and cycle the slide again.
You ever noticed on tv and in the movies they always rack the slide right before they shoot someone? I'll tell you what.. if I'm ever caught up in a movie and a guy comes at me with a gun... I'm rushing his ass... I know he doesn't have one in the chamber, because he's saving that for "plot thickener" right when he's going to shoot me.
 

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I am convinced that the proper way to reload or
insert a loaded magazine, is to have the slide
retracted and then insert the magazine, opposite
hand retract slide backwards and then release it.

The main reason that I have come to this conclusion
is that the variables are taken out of the equation.

No slingshooting either, even though it was allowed
by the calveryman on horse back with their 1911s.

Ed
 

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When you chamber a round loading from the magazine, the rim of the round rides up UNDER the claw of the extractor as it strips from the magazine. No stress is put on the extractor. If you load by putting a round into the chamber first, the extractor must ride OVER the rim of the cartridge, putting heavy stress on the extractor in a direction that normally does not get stressed. If the pistol has an internal extractor, as does the standard 1911 and the XD, the problem is worse because the extractor has limited travel space toward the outside of the pistol; it hits the inside of the slide. Sooner or later, the extractor will break if you load a loose round directly into the chamber.

Best way to load: Insert a full magazine and load a round into the chamber. Do a magazine exchange with a full magazine (known as a tactical reload, a reload with retention, or an administrative reload). Top off the original magazine with one round and insert into your mag carrier, pants pocket, whatever you use.
 
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