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I have a Shooting area for Pistol Target shooting (plinking) at my homestead. I have set up 2”-12” ar500 steel targets as well as paper targets . On average I will fire 200-400 rds 2-3 times a week when I am between jobs (traveling Pipe Fitter/Welder) . When on the road I find a firing range but usually slack off and go a couple times a week at most. But still anything under 200rds feels depressing! I also rarely shoot my pistols that I’m not going to be carrying . With the amount of ammunition that I use , would making my own ammunition be worth while? Or would I be better off buying 1000rds for $250 twice a month. (.40S&W is my cartridge of choice for self defense) . The XD-S .40 has been my EDC for a little over a year now . Thanks for your input guys !!!
 

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I tend to shoot around 500 rounds (between pistols and rifles) at each range session unless I am teaching.
 
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So I’m not completely going stupid with ammunition ha! I usually bring 2 of my cc pistols which are mostly single stacks so lots of reloading ! Luckily I have 8 7rnd .40 mags for the XD-S
 

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I belong to a private gun club and when I go I make a good day out of it. Usually 1 1/2 to 3 hr.s min. and never less than 150 rounds.
When I get my new gun I will do what I always do, 300 min. down range the first day out with it. If's it an auto-loader I'll try for 400 min. first time out.

After that it will be at least once a month this year 150-300 min. But might break it up to going every two weeks as my new routine.
It's been 8 months since I've shot and it's really bugging me. I'm trying to decide on a new gun to get for myself.

 

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Discussion Starter #6
I
I belong to a private gun club and when I go I make a good day out of it. Usually 1 1/2 to 3 hr.s min. and never less than 150 rounds.
When I get my new gun I will do what I always do, 300 min. down range the first day out with it. If's it an auto-loader I'll try for 400 min. first time out.

After that it will be at least once a month this year 150-300 min. But might break it up to going every two weeks as my new routine.
It's been 8 months since I've shot and it's really bugging me. I'm trying to decide on a new gun to get for myself.


If you conceal carry and want an awesome little shooter then the XD-S is a awesome option. I carry mine everyday and love shooting it . I can shoot a 3” spread @ 40yrds no problem with upgrades XS F8 sights
 

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There is a range close enough to me that I can go three or four times per week. So, each trip I shoot 1 mag of .22, 1 mag of 9mm, 1 mag of .45 and 1 cylinder of .38 special. This helps me make every shot count and prevents me actually getting less accurate from shooting longer than I can concentrate (insert your own joke here). It also keeps my cost down. Before this range opened, I went to one much further away and felt like I had to shoot a lot when I went to justify the trip. My shooting always deteriorated before I finished.
 

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As a firearms instructor of many years, I advise shooting fewer rounds more frequently rather than more rounds less frequently. It is analogous to weight conditioning. Space out your range visits and make each round count. I am not impressed with people who say, “I fired 1500 rounds at the range yesterday!” Mere mag dumps do little to hone your shooting skills.
 

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I reload and my typical range session is 4 guns and around 300 rounds per week. Used to be a lot more when I shot bullseye.
 

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With the amount of ammunition that I use , would making my own ammunition be worth while? Or would I be better off buying 1000rds for $250 twice a month.
Either have someone who reloads here work up the per-round cost of raw materials for you, or have a local reloader do the same. Once you have this cost-projection, next factor in your "time investment."

Compare this cost to your spendings on ammo. Don't forget to include gasoline for your trip to/from the store, or the time you might spend in the gun shop chatting with your friends as a part of the incidentals that will equate to the time investment" of reloading, above.

This math will allow you to determine for yourself if reloading is actually worth it, for you.

With range-fodder ammo - and I classify this as both self-practice as well as the ammo that I take to training classes - I will shoot whatever is cheapest that (1) functions my firearm without excessive failure and (2) offers reasonable accuracy/precision.

Number 1 is self-explanatory. If the gun is failing due to ammo related issues, then that's going to cut in to my practice time or will impact my learning in classes. Unless the class or my training session is to specifically focus on failure drills, this is a non-starter. My threshold of acceptability? Half a percent (0.5%) - one out of every 200 rounds. Virtually all range ammo will EASILY make this mark, unless there are specific-ammo to unique-gun issues, which is essentially what I am trying to avoid.

For number 2, I use Larry Vickers' standard: Accuracy . This meas that whatever ammo I use - much as I have taken the to prove to myself that specific ammo doesn't cause any unique-gun issues - I will also benchmark that ammo for performance. Again, for most duty/defensive-grade handguns, most range-fodder ammo will easily hold 5 inches, freestyle (and close to half that when shot supported) - at 25 yards. To wit, at training classes, most of the top instructors will benchmark the students with a graded exercise at 25 yards (typically a very generously timed drill on an NRA B8): you won't see anyone running back to their vehicles or range-bags to pull out some kind of magic "match ammo." :lol: Everyone will just shoot whatever they came to class with.

As a higher-volume hobby shooter, you should be taking the time to check function as well as external ballistics with your ammo, so that you'll have a better idea of what does reasonably well in your gun, and what doesn't.



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As for your range practice, try not to think of it in terms of pure round count.

Instead, work like you do for anything else: have a plan.

If that plan is to just send 10 rounds downrange with absolute best-possible accuracy/precision, fine, work that. So you can only sustain focus at the 25 yard line for 50 rounds? Well, then your day is just one box of ammo.

Don't just go to the range and say that you need to plow through rounds, with no plan. Trust me, that really doesn't have much value other than racking up a huge round-count, and that round-count can lead to bad habits (don't believe me when I say this? OK: ask Robert Vogel - he highlights to his students that he'll put in twice as many "shots" dry-fire as he's just shot at his last competition, specifically with the goal of eradicating any bad habits he may have picked up during the match) just as it can help you build endurance. If you look at my two log threads, you'll see that I readily admitted that I likely wasted more than half my round-count on every marathon practice day that I'd put in at the range.

Have a plan, and work that plan.

The pistoltraining.com "Drills" page has a wonderful list of excellent drills and tests that you can work for virtually any range day, regardless of outdoors or indoors, and irrespective of whether the range allows you to draw, move, or rapid-fire:

pistol-training.com » Drills

There's something in there for everyone. :)

Aside from that, Big Tex Outdoors, one of the excellent P&S community-supporting vendors, always puts up a "drill of the month" every month, and you can even video your results to compete for a prize. Chuck Pressburg (Roland) Presscheck Consulting, Bill Blowers at Tap Rack Tactical, as well as many other noted trainers also frequently and routinely post drills to their FB pages and/or YouTube Channels. Here's Modern Samurai Project's Scott Jedlinski FAILING the Pressburg "No Fail Drill" -


Context of the drill, from Roland himself:


^ He talks about why, at the end (start at the 5-minute mark).

A large "how many rounds?!" always sounds impressive to newbies. And I will confess that I was among those who both thought it was impressive and stood awed at those who shot even more than I do. ;) But the truth? It's much more about how and why you put the rounds downrange that you did, rather than just how many you threw out there. In my first year, I was close to 1,000 rounds a week, usually doing so via a single marathon 8-hour session. My shooting at the time was undeniably above-average for those at my experience level, but it also wasn't stellar, and I know now, looking back, it was because I focused only on that round-count figure and time-on-task, without realizing the quality (or lack thereof! :p) of work that I'd put in: I honestly might as well have just taken half the rounds I'd spent on those days and literally threw them downrange, without even bothering to take them out of the box. :lol:

This is not to say that volume of fire or rate-of-fire aren't important or that they teach nothing. On the contrary, there's things like endurance as well as recoil control that can only be worked effectively live-fire, full caliber.

But unless those are the skills that you're working, it's not always about round count.

It's about effort and accountability. :)



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Keep a written range log.

It can hold your drills (and record your performance) as well as help you keep track of which ammo worked better/worse in your gun (this will also help notice any batch/lot-related problems, and can aid you in submitting for refund/recall), and, importantly, track "mileage" on your guns so that you can perform both preventative maintenance and track breakage.
 

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Now that the desert is closed for fire restrictions - I am shooting at an indoor range. That means I am only shooting handguns - and for only 1 hour. That generally means 300 rounds every Saturday.

When the fire restrictions are lifted, I will shoot my rifles a lot more. The fact that we spend 2 or 3 hours out there with multiples of weapons - means it will be more like 500 rounds.

It's a good thing I waste my valuable time reloading!
 
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