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After reading an article in a gun mag about the importance of inspecting your carry ammo, I took a look at mine. Two boxes of Winchester Ranger JHP .40 caliber at 180 gr.

What I found points out the importance of inspecting every single round of your primary defense ammo. One round that a defect in that there was something between the bullet and the cartridge case that had causes the case to bulge. It looks as if a metal fine or bit of wire was jammed between the case and the bullet when it was assembled. In this case, the round will chamber in the barrel but I don't intend on testing it, I'll just return in to my gun shop and let them dispose of it.

The point is that factory ammo is loaded on automated lines that probably produce thousands of rounds per hour and a defective load can slip through. In my case I had one defective round out of 100 purchased and it was NOT the cheap stuff, it was a somewhat costly name brand defensive choice. So, if it's ammo that you plan on using to protect your home and family, spending a bit of time looking over every round is well worth the time invested.
 

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So interesting that I went and looked at new box of Magtech, Guardian Gold .380 auto +p 85gr JHP. All in great shape but worth the look. First time buying Magtech.
I think its a very good reminder for us to pay attention.
 

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After reading an article in a gun mag about the importance of inspecting your carry ammo, I took a look at mine. Two boxes of Winchester Ranger JHP .40 caliber at 180 gr.

What I found points out the importance of inspecting every single round of your primary defense ammo. One round that a defect in that there was something between the bullet and the cartridge case that had causes the case to bulge. It looks as if a metal fine or bit of wire was jammed between the case and the bullet when it was assembled. In this case, the round will chamber in the barrel but I don't intend on testing it, I'll just return in to my gun shop and let them dispose of it.

The point is that factory ammo is loaded on automated lines that probably produce thousands of rounds per hour and a defective load can slip through. In my case I had one defective round out of 100 purchased and it was NOT the cheap stuff, it was a somewhat costly name brand defensive choice. So, if it's ammo that you plan on using to protect your home and family, spending a bit of time looking over every round is well worth the time invested.
Scooter, If the bullet were mine, I'd use it on my next range outing. I'm totally confident that it will work, from what you have described. Admittedly, it should not have made it through the inspection at the factory, but if it will fit the chamber, it will not cause a problem. I've reloaded thousands of bullets and I've seen a few that match your description of this particular bullet. It's caused from brass shavings. When it happens to target ammo, it's not as big of a thing.
 

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Always visually inspect your cartridges! If you're lazy like me, you can inspect them as you are loading them into the magazine.

I check for obstructions in the bullet hollowpoint cavity; case bulges; primer flush with base; ammo that's been chambered multiple times; corrosion, anything out of the ordinary, etc..
 

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Always visually inspect your cartridges! If you're lazy like me, you can inspect them as you are loading them into the magazine.

I check for obstructions in the bullet hollowpoint cavity; case bulges; primer flush with base; ammo that's been chambered multiple times; corrosion, anything out of the ordinary, etc..
That's not lazy, just practical. I look at the rounds when I load them in the mag/cylinder.
 

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Yeah I check my ammo.

A little story.

A long time ago, back when Ronald Reagan was president and everyone carried revolvers. I used to follow him around the country. Part of my duties included sweeping the staff's hotel rooms after they left to make sure no classified information was left in the hotel rooms. (yeah it happens).

On one trip one of the rooms I went into belonged to the lead USSS agent. He had left behind one of his speed loader carriers with the speed loader and 6 rounds of ammo in it. One of those 6 rounds had been damaged in the factory loading. The case mouth had crumpled down. There is no way it would have fed into the chamber of his revolver it was so messed up.

Yeah even factory ammo can be damaged, here's a round of 9MM from a box of WWB:
 

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I, check each round after reloading. Store bought ammo I, check before putting it the mag.
 
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