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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a XD 40 that was slightly used during a shooters show. I immediately took it to the range and the first round fired just fine. However, the second round failed to chamber. It seemed that the round pushed up past the barrel and got stuck. I thought that it was the magazine because it is a 12 round mag and I could only fit 10 in it without trying my hardest. I then went and purchased another mag and had the same problem.

Any suggestions?

BTW I am a new gun user/owner so I may or may not understand certain gun lingo. I was in the military and may use terms that I learned there.
 

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I recently purchased a XD 40 that was slightly used during a shooters show. I immediately took it to the range and the first round fired just fine. However, the second round failed to chamber. It seemed that the round pushed up past the barrel and got stuck. I thought that it was the magazine because it is a 12 round mag and I could only fit 10 in it without trying my hardest. I then went and purchased another mag and had the same problem.

Any suggestions?

BTW I am a new gun user/owner so I may or may not understand certain gun lingo. I was in the military and may use terms that I learned there.
It sounds like "limp wristing", meaning not a firm enough grip to allow the slide to fully hit the back stop and cycle forward. It fully cycles only when it encounters enough resistance from your grip.

BTW, welcome to the forum. You bought yourself a fine gun.
 

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I'll try it, but I also had two other very muscular dudes that fired it and had the same problem.
It's not a strength issue but more of a grip style thing. If your hand has a great grip on the gun but your wrist is not firm then you will experience this. It's a little tough getting used to because the tendency with a really firm wrist hold sends your shots too low.

Could you decsribe your grip style? By that I mean something like "Coffee cup" (left hand supporting under your right like you're holding a cup from the bottom, if you're a righty).

That might be helpful here.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah coffee cup sounds about right. Right hand holding the gun and left hand supporting the right underneath.
 

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I recently purchased a XD 40 that was slightly used during a shooters show. I immediately took it to the range and the first round fired just fine. However, the second round failed to chamber. It seemed that the round pushed up past the barrel and got stuck. I thought that it was the magazine because it is a 12 round mag and I could only fit 10 in it without trying my hardest. I then went and purchased another mag and had the same problem.

Any suggestions?

BTW I am a new gun user/owner so I may or may not understand certain gun lingo. I was in the military and may use terms that I learned there.
Welcome to the forum

The description of the jam is kinda vague and I'm having a hard time understanding exactly what happened. Got a pic of the jam?

By the way, the Saucer and Teacup method is all wrong.

Watch this video. It will clear up a lot of your grip issues.

YouTube - Firearms training Todd Jarrett
 

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Yeah coffee cup sounds about right. Right hand holding the gun and left hand supporting the right underneath.
OK, then the only suggestion I have without seeing this is to be aware of the muzzle flip that can occur with .40 and realize that the wrist breaking while the gun is pushing down from the top of the "flip" could be causing this.

I just think it will take a little work on keeping the muzzle down as much as possible to keep the recoil headed directly back at you instead of down toward the feet while it's breaking upward to help get it back into battery.
 

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lack of a firm grip is a common issue on inertia driven guns.

The action is cycled by the recoil. If the firearm moves too much, there isn't enough energy for the action. Typically, this shows us as a failure to feed by the action not picking up the next round. It sounds like the gun opened up just enough to catch the next round, but not fully open. the bolt didn't have enough forward momentum to quickly strip a round off the magazine and chamber it causing the round to misfeed.

Another thing, since the firearm was used, it needs a good cleaning and clean the magazine also.
 
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