Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just cleaned the xd-40 today. This was the process:

1) Dismantled firearm into the barrel, spring....
2) I put power solvent through the barrel using the bore brush with a patch and on mechanisms on the slide and all the other moving mechanisms
3) I then sprayed desk cleaner which is composed of hexane which dries on its own through the barrel and mechanisms
4) I then put a dry patch through the barrel to make sure everything was dry and I dried everything else.
5) I put oil on a patch through the barrel and slightly oiled all the other mechanisms.

This is how I cleaned it. Am I missing anything? Do I do it in the right process? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I guess I take a different approach towards cleaning... one of the biggest things I do is run a bore brush through the bore to get out all of the deposits left behind from firing the pistol. I also use a cleaning brush to scrub the exterior and all moving components in the pistol. Follow up with bore patches, a good wipe down of all the parts and a light oiling. Take a silicone embedded cloth and wipe the outside of the barrel and upper reciever to give a light finish of oil to keep it looking nice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Im new to guns and was wondering how do you know what to clean and oil? You mention oiling mechanisms and was wondering exactly what you mean? As for the silicone cloth does that have some oil on it to protect the gun already or do you have to put that on. I tried to go to hs2000's website for how to clean but it never loads so if you wouldnt mind helpin me out i would appreciate it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
359 Posts
Anywhere metal rubs metal, you'll want to lube. That includes the outside of barrel, including the chamber hood and locking lugs. You'll want to lightly lube the locking block and slide rails and channels in the slide. I also oil the breech block (that rail that leads to the breech face underneath the slide) lightly.

I also would say, anywhere that looks like it is wearing, that doesn't necessarily touch other metal, should get a light coating of oil. That includes the outside of the slide. Also, that means a light coating of oil EVERYWHERE, letting it dry a bit, and wiping off the excess to inhibit rust.

I use RemOil pretty much exclusively, I can't stand the smell of CLP. After my hands are oily, I put a drop on said areas, and smooth it out with my oily finger. I blow on it a little bit to dry it a little, then wipe of the excess. This leaves a thin coating of oil. As it dries out, the RemOil leaves a bit of a cloudy coating (that's the teflon that is suspended in the oil). You have to shake the bottle before using it to mix the teflon with the oil carrier. That's good, even a dry gun will have a bit of teflon on it to assist in lubrication. I also avoid over lubrication this way

As for the silicone cloth, that is great for getting rid of fingerprints. A fresh one will leave a light coating on the outside of all wiped surfaces which inhibits rust. You DO NOT put oil on silicone cloth. It is already impregnated with silicone/oil stuff. Also, I don't rub the chamber hood (exposed in the ejection port in a closed slide) with the silicone cloth, as I feel it wipes off any oil coating I might have had on it.

-stunks

EDIT: I think a lot of people create their own cleaning processes. You can find on the internet a lot of different processes for gun cleaning. Here is a link from a custom shop called cylinder and slide http://www.cylinder-slide.com/cleaning.shtml ,it's a goot primer to cleaning, you can modify that method so it suits you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Yeah i would appreciate it Ajames if you could put that on the website. It would prove very helpful for me. If it included step by step procedures with pictures. I think this would help those of us who are new to guns and dont have anyone to show us firsthand. Thanks Guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Haven't gotten an XD yet, but I'm a 1911 owner and those girls positively devour lubricant.

My bore cleaning process is as follows:

-Run a wet patch of bore solvent (in my case Shooter's Choice) through the bore and let sit for at least 5 minutes while cleaning the rest of the weapon. (I like to make sure the extractor hook is free of gunk. Also, the feed ramp, whether it's on the barrel or the frame, must be clean, dry, smooth, and shiny.)
-Run a dry patch to pick up all the goo.
-Wet a bore brush and run through several times, making sure to never reverse directions while the brush is still in the bore.
-Run another dry patch to pick up more goo.
-Run a bore snake a few times.
-Begin alternating wet and dry patches until the dry patches run clean and the James Bond visual inspection looks shiny.
-Run a multi-purpose cleaner/lubricant-wetted patch through.
-Run a dry patch to pick up the excess.

I always run my patches chamber to muzzle, then remove them rather than drag them backwards.

As for lubing the XD, I've never done it. I did at one point find a diagram of the exact spots on the slide that need to be lubed, but I've somehow misplaced the link.

General lubing advice:

The slide rails like it. I use grease, since I store my 1911 horizontally and I want the lube to stay put. Wilson Combat ultima-lube is great stuff.

The barrel and hood get a few drops of oil that are then smoothed on by fingertip. Supposedly, the Wilson stuff binds to the metal and has some permanent lubricating properties. Sounds like hype to me, but when it's on there, it works wonderfully.

When finished with lubing and reassembly, remember to rack the slide 5 times and wipe away the excess lubricant.

Your silicone cloth is great for final touch up, and since it's a poly-framed gun, it's easier to do than ever. Just pay attention as you use the cloth. After a few months, the cloth will no longer have any embedded lubricant. You'll be able to tell because your wiping will simply mash the same fingerprint around instead of wiping it away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,738 Posts
I'm thinking about just using spray on white lithium grease for the slide.

Grease should do well in this application since the slide cycles many times when you are shooting and will stick instead of leaking down while stored in a holster.

Plus, it will cut down on those little specks of oil on the front of my glasses.


Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,135 Posts
NewXD40fun said:
I'm thinking about just using spray on white lithium grease for the slide.

Grease should do well in this application since the slide cycles many times when you are shooting and will stick instead of leaking down while stored in a holster.

Plus, it will cut down on those little specks of oil on the front of my glasses.


Tom

You may want to consider something else, like spray telfon, availible at Lowe's hardware stores. Goes on wet, and drys leaving a teflon coating where you need it.

YEARS ago i was on a construction site, it was winter with the butt chillin temps that go with winter. There was a small dozer on site that somebody wanted moved for some reason. The owner operator was not there to move it, but the keys were. So some yutz goes over there and tries to move it, he couldn't because it was frozen to the ground. so they grabbed a big can of gas and poured it on the treads where it contacts the ground. They then heard one young guy yelling no, no no. I mentioned there was flamable grease on there and they could have a big problem. But I was a kid. Kids know nothing. They lit the gas, which lit the grease. The guy on the thing jumped off. The owner shows up , pretty mad. Starts the thing and lifts the blade a few times, smacking it into the ground. That broke it free. He didn't move the thing UNTIL he re greased what he wanted to.

Grease burns. gun powder burns. Hair burns. Clothing burns. People don't want to burn.
Yes oil can burn, but it would burn off fairly quickly. Grease may take awhile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,738 Posts
tec said:
NewXD40fun said:
I'm thinking about just using spray on white lithium grease for the slide.
Grease should do well in this application since the slide cycles many times when you are shooting and will stick instead of leaking down while stored in a holster.
Plus, it will cut down on those little specks of oil on the front of my glasses.
Tom
You may want to consider something else, like spray telfon, availible at Lowe's hardware stores. Goes on wet, and drys leaving a teflon coating where you need it.
Grease burns. gun powder burns. Hair burns. Clothing burns. People don't want to burn.
Yes oil can burn, but it would burn off fairly quickly. Grease may take awhile.
Great, another vote for grease - oil is much more volatile than grease!

Interesting story...


Tom
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top