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Discussion Starter #1
Lacking a digital camera, all I can provide are s#itty pics from my cel phone. I got this rifle from a relative who passed away a couple years ago. It works, I know that much, only put 12 rounds through it since I've owned it, but at least I know that it works. Aside from that, I have no idea what it is. It is a 7mm Mauser (7x57mm) by the way.

The rifle appears to be a service rifle of some sort, that's my guess. It has a steel plate on the end of the buttstock instead of plastic, plain wood, or rubber like you'd expect a sporting rifle to have, 2 sling mounts at the front and rear of the stock, elevation adjustable rear sights, and the whole thing seems to be dinged up pretty good like it's seen some action, not just regular wear 'n tear. Both the metal and wood surfaces seem to have been patched/repaired at least once in its lifetime (nothing serious) and also seems to have had a new finish applied to the wood years ago. Portions of the metal (barrel, receiver, underbody, etc.) seem to have been re-blued in patches, definitely an amateur job. It has "1927" stamped on the bottom, so I assume that's the year of manufacture? There are no symbols or other markings that give me any clus as to the country of manufacture.

Of course, the crappy cel phone pictures barely show any of what I'm describing, but I added some infromation to each picture that might help.

I took pictures of everything that I thought might be identifiable or helpful in any way, including any numbers I found.

















Any help would be appreciated, I'd really just like to know what I have.

Thanks!
 

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Lacking a digital camera, all I can provide are s#itty pics from my cel phone. I got this rifle from a relative who passed away a couple years ago. It works, I know that much, only put 12 rounds through it since I've owned it, but at least I know that it works. Aside from that, I have no idea what it is. It is a 7mm Mauser (7x57mm) by the way.

The rifle appears to be a service rifle of some sort, that's my guess. It has a steel plate on the end of the buttstock instead of plastic, plain wood, or rubber like you'd expect a sporting rifle to have, 2 sling mounts at the front and rear of the stock, elevation adjustable rear sights, and the whole thing seems to be dinged up pretty good like it's seen some action, not just regular wear 'n tear. Both the metal and wood surfaces seem to have been patched/repaired at least once in its lifetime (nothing serious) and also seems to have had a new finish applied to the wood years ago. Portions of the metal (barrel, receiver, underbody, etc.) seem to have been re-blued in patches, definitely an amateur job. It has "1927" stamped on the bottom, so I assume that's the year of manufacture? There are no symbols or other markings that give me any clus as to the country of manufacture.

Of course, the crappy cel phone pictures barely show any of what I'm describing, but I added some infromation to each picture that might help.

I took pictures of everything that I thought might be identifiable or helpful in any way, including any numbers I found.

















Any help would be appreciated, I'd really just like to know what I have.

Thanks!
Can't be sure from the pics, but it looks like a sporterized Mauser, although I am a bit perplexed by the hole cut into the receiver. First time I've ever seen a hole like that one. Does the safety only click in the 2 positions, or does it click into 3 positions?
 

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1893 Spanish Mauser. Good rifle but not as strong as a '98. Excellent cartridge, kills all out of proportion to its size; don't hot-rod it in this rifle. The old 7x57 is just fine to about 300 yards, on medium game. I like 139 grain soft points for deer.

Have the headspace checked before you shoot it much.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Can't be sure from the pics, but it looks like a sporterized Mauser, although I am a bit perplexed by the hole cut into the receiver. First time I've ever seen a hole like that one. Does the safety only click in the 2 positions, or does it click into 3 positions?
2 positions. I can't quite explain the hole in the receiver either - perhaps a way of visually checking if the rifle is in full battery? That's probably not the case though, because if it wasn't you'd already know without having to look.
 

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1893 Spanish Mauser. Good rifle but not as strong as a '98. Excellent cartridge, kills all out of proportion to its size; don't hot-rod it in this rifle. The old 7x57 is just fine to about 300 yards, on medium game.
Is the cutout on the receiver original to the rifle? That's the first time I've seen a hole cut into any type of Mauser.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
1893 Spanish Mauser. Good rifle but not as strong as a '98. Excellent cartridge, kills all out of proportion to its size; don't hot-rod it in this rifle. The old 7x57 is just fine to about 300 yards, on medium game.
You sure? Just asking because I want to know where you got that from. How do you know the country and the date? I don't see 1893 on it anywhere or anything to indicate Spanish at all. Not challenging you, just wondering how you knew for personal reference.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Is the cutout on the receiver original to the rifle? That's the first time I've seen a hole cut into any type of Mauser.
I have no idea. I know nothing about the rifle other than what I've mentioned in my first post. There's nothing about the hole that would lead me to believe that it was cut after production - looks as old as everything else, but I'm not exactly qualified to make that kind of judgement. It does seem strange though, like it serves no obvious purpose. At least to me.
 

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Is the cutout on the receiver original to the rifle? That's the first time I've seen a hole cut into any type of Mauser.
I think so (believe it's a gas vent) and I know I've seen it before; but I haven't had a small-ring (1893-96) Mauser around for years so I could be wrong about that. I was using an original Rolling Block back when I was hunting with the 7mm.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I think so (believe it's a gas vent) and I know I've seen it before; but I haven't had a small-ring (1893-96) Mauser around for years so I could be wrong about that. I was using an original Rolling Block back when I was hunting with the 7mm.
Ah, so it is not necessarily abnormal? I suppose a gas vent would explain it, as far as I would know anyway :D

Could you define a few things you mentioned for me?
- gas vent? Why would a bolt-action rifle need a gas vent?
- small-ring? Never heard this term before. What does it mean?
- Rolling Block? Never heard this term before. What does it mean?

You'll have to excuse my ignorance, I'm a complete newbie to rifles, even the ones I own :D
 

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The hole is in the origional design, it is a gas vent beacuse of the inconsistancy of military rounds of the time. My grandfather used to sportsterize many older military mausers as a hobby. I still have one of his he made back in the 50's that was rechambered/barreled to shoot .308. If you check it the action still opens very easily when on safe, and the fireing pin action will slam forward when opening the bolt off safe. Scares the crap out of you with a round chambered but will not fire. The safe position is designed to be in the way of the sights so untrained soliders knew the safety was on, and at that time they did not have scopes on the rifle, there is a modification you can do to the safety to cure this but it costs about $400.00 and you would need to find an old school, real gunsmith to do it. My Mexican Mauser (as the are called)cant chamber a round with the safety on because it was tapped for a scope and the safety tang would hit the scope first. Haven't seen one like yours for a long time.
 

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Ah, so it is not necessarily abnormal? I suppose a gas vent would explain it, as far as I would know anyway :D

Could you define a few things you mentioned for me?
- gas vent? Why would a bolt-action rifle need a gas vent?
- small-ring? Never heard this term before. What does it mean?
- Rolling Block? Never heard this term before. What does it mean?

You'll have to excuse my ignorance, I'm a complete newbie to rifles, even the ones I own :D
Gase vent--In the case of a cartridge failure, gas would be diverted out of the sides of the action, instead of straight back into the shooter's face...also, by giving the gas a place to go, it will (hopefully) prevent a catastrophic failure of the action.

Small-ring--the size (diameter) of the receiver where it meets the barrel. Small ring Mausers are generally considered not as strong as large-ring Mausers.

Rolling Block--type of rifle action where the breechblock would rotate (roll) back to allow loading and unloading of the cartridge. Rolling blocks are single-shot rifles.

And, it does look like a sporterized Mauser. Is there a crest, or any marking on top of the receiver right behind the rear sight?
 

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The hole is in the origional design, it is a gas vent beacuse of the inconsistancy of military rounds of the time. My grandfather used to sportsterize many older military mausers as a hobby. I still have one of his he made back in the 50's that was rechambered/barreled to shoot .308. If you check it the action still opens very easily when on safe, and the fireing pin action will slam forward when opening the bolt off safe. Scares the crap out of you with a round chambered but will not fire. The safe position is designed to be in the way of the sights so untrained soliders knew the safety was on, and at that time they did not have scopes on the rifle, there is a modification you can do to the safety to cure this but it costs about $400.00 and you would need to find an old school, real gunsmith to do it. My Mexican Mauser (as the are called)cant chamber a round with the safety on because it was tapped for a scope and the safety tang would hit the scope first. Haven't seen one like yours for a long time.
That's pretty cool. I haven't ever seen a vent hole like that in a rifle. We don't get many sporter jobs around here in shops anymore, and the people I know who have sporters were more interested in using U.S. service rifles and converting foreign rifles to U.S. calibers. The most beautiful sporter job I've ever seen was an Arisaka converted to 308.
 

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It does indeed look like a sporterized Mexican Mauser. Is there a crest on the top of the forward receiver ring?
 
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