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Discussion Starter #1
So, my first post and I already need help.....
Long time lurker here, mostly soaking up the knowledge, tips and tricks. However, today I decided to do some polishing on my XD9 Service. Namely the sear surface.
Long story short, I went overboard with my Dremel, ended up recontouring the sear face and now my beloved XD is not functional anymore.
I'm pretty sure I need a new sear, so the question is what do I do about it??

Has anyone with a similar problem (buggering up the gun on your own) tried contacing Springfield and what results can I expect if I do talk to them??
I'm willing to pay for the part, no biggie here.

But I also came across folks stating Springfield took care of them in similar scenarios, and just mailing them the parts....
Any info, advice, ridicule and the sorts greatly appreciated!!!
 

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www.xd-hs2000.com Ajamesp sells internal parts there. Also has the disassembly instructions on his site so you can pull out the old and put in the new. :) As far as SA would go, I don't know but I wouldn't expect them to warranty it, and its an easy enough part to replace so I'd do it myself.

Matthew
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the suggestions and fast replies. I figured somone had to have small parts for sale, but could not find any at pistol-gear.com. Guess I had the wrong site in my sights (pardon the pun).
It seems it'd be fairly easy to exchange the not-so-original-anymore sear with the new one.
Thanks again, much appreciated!!!!!
 

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Just out of curiosity, what kind of attachment were you using on your dremel tool while polishing the sear? I have considered similar antics and don't want to make the same mistake.....
 

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Don't be in such a hurry. Life is short. Polish it by hand, learn to enjoy time spent with your guns other than at the range and there will be less of a chance to damage it.
 

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mpholic said:
Don't be in such a hurry. Life is short. Polish it by hand, learn to enjoy time spent with your guns other than at the range and there will be less of a chance to damage it.
Amen Brother, If it ain't broke don't fix it....I am a armorer for Springfield XD's for my Police Department, what you have done is somthing two of my officers tried and ended up with the same results...Springfield gave me a bunch of parts for our departments pistols....I fixed them! :wink: But it cost's them a 12 pack of Bud Light and a pizza everytime! :wink: :D

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #8
icwtumn said:
Just out of curiosity, what kind of attachment were you using on your dremel tool while polishing the sear? I have considered similar antics and don't want to make the same mistake.....
I started with a fine file (jeweler's??) at first, made about 5-6 passes and then switched to a felt polishing attachment with some jeweler's rouge.
I checked as I went along, and it worked nicely, mostly shortening the trigger action once you took up all the pretravel out.
From there it was a real nice quick, crisp break. But I got caught up in trying to make it even better, and messed up when it Dremeled from the wrong side (namely the sharp edge that meets the striker edge) and rounded it off.

Now if I actually keep pressure on the slide downwards, sear will engage the striker and it will function, but as soon as I release the slide pressure it discharges by itself.

But let me tell you, it's the lightest trigger I ever had. That includes my Ruger GP-100's single action- about 1.5 pounds, my Ruger 10/22's 2.5 pound trigger job and my Dan Wessson's awesome 3 pound action.

Had I just left it alone it would've been just perfect...lol
You live, you learn....and open your wallet to fix the mess

Ajamesp51, my order is in, got a couple extras too.....Thanks !!
 

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To polish my sear I used the "Premium Lapping Kit" from here:

http://www.easypckits.com/

All it is is a heat sink (for your computer) lapping kit with sandpapers ranging from 400 grit to 2000 grit, as well as a small piece of glass (for perfectly smooth surface). I took out the sear and ran it through the different levels of sandpaper until I had pretty much a mirror surface, then used the dremel with the jewelers rouge to give it the final polish. By taking the sear out, putting the piece of sandpaper on the glass, and holding it firmly to the sandpaper, it kept the angles properly. Just remember you're not trying to remove quantities of metal, just trying to get a perfectly even and smooth surface. :)

Matthew
 

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I started with a fine file (jeweler's??)
Even a fine file is extreme. Stoning is about as drastic as I would attempt.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Frenchy said:
I started with a fine file (jeweler's??)
Even a fine file is extreme. Stoning is about as drastic as I would attempt.
Well, had no stone to start out with, and wanted to do it with something that would allow the sear the stay in the frame. That's why I resorted to using a file. And I only made a few very light passes.

It really was the Dremel action and the approach angle that ruined the sear more than anything. But I agree, on some guns file is not the way to go, no matter how gentle the attempt.
 

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I took a gunsmithing class a while back. Our instructor said that more guns are ruined every year by dremels then anything else. Most gunsmiths use metal files, or sand stone to do their work.
 

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I have a very small ruby polishing stone that does awesome trigger work.
 

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sturmruger said:
I took a gunsmithing class a while back. Our instructor said that more guns are ruined every year by dremels then anything else. Most gunsmiths use metal files, or sand stone to do their work.
I heard a quote once that went something like this:

"No problem is so bad that a Dremel can't make it worse."
 

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Discussion Starter #15
SLCDave said:
sturmruger said:
I took a gunsmithing class a while back. Our instructor said that more guns are ruined every year by dremels then anything else. Most gunsmiths use metal files, or sand stone to do their work.
I heard a quote once that went something like this:

"No problem is so bad that a Dremel can't make it worse."
I agree to a point. Like anything in life, too much of Dremel action can mess stuff up. Again, not to sound like a parrot here, it's really how I used it more than Dremel being inherently "bad" tool to use in home gunsmithing....
Dremel can be great if used prudently.....
You just have to know when to quit....lol
And I didn't. :eek:
 
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