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Hi All,

I'm in the process of doing my .45 Super conversion to my Suppressor Ready XDm 45, and I've got some observations and info.

First and foremost, I picked up a Wolff Extra power 22lb spring.


My first observation here is that this spring is... well... it feels almost identical to the stock spring in the gun. I got my hands on a 10mm XDm, and its factory recoil spring feels identical as well... I'm not necessarily sure that the 22lbs spring I bought is actually a 22lbs spring... or maybe the factory spring is heavier than the 18 lbs they advertise... in any case, I'm going to trust that it is correct. It also comes with a replacement striker spring, but since this is a new gun, I didn't replace mine... nor does it really need it. If it was a hammer fired gun with an inertial firing pin (like a 1911), then maybe you should replace it... but this isn't, so you don't need to replace it.

One of the biggest concerns you (yes YOU) need to worry about with aftermarket springs is that the ends are not the same shape as a factory recoil spring. Factory springs have been ground flat to uniformly distribute loads along the flat base of the guide rod. Just about every aftermarket spring I have seen hasn't been ground flat, and when shooting heavy recoiling loads, can damage and/or break your guide rod (and nobody wants that). So, you need to grind a flat side onto your recoil spring.

Before:


After:




I don't have a grinding wheel, so I used a coarse honing stone to grind the end flat.

Here is another before and after:


This applies to both .45 and 10mm XDms.

More to come after I shoot this bad boy.

 
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Hi All,

I'm in the process of doing my .45 Super conversion to my Suppressor Ready XDm 45, and I've got some observations and info.

First and foremost, I picked up a Wolff Extra power 22lb spring.


My first observation here is that this spring is... well... it feels almost identical to the stock spring in the gun. I got my hands on a 10mm XDm, and its factory recoil spring feels identical as well... I'm not necessarily sure that the 22lbs spring I bought is actually a 22lbs spring... or maybe the factory spring is heavier than the 18 lbs they advertise... in any case, I'm going to trust that it is correct. It also comes with a replacement striker spring, but since this is a new gun, I didn't replace mine... nor does it really need it. If it was a hammer fired gun with an inertial firing pin (like a 1911), then maybe you should replace it... but this isn't, so you don't need to replace it.

One of the biggest concerns you (yes YOU) need to worry about with aftermarket springs is that the ends are not the same shape as a factory recoil spring. Factory springs have been ground flat to uniformly distribute loads along the flat base of the guide rod. Just about every aftermarket spring I have seen hasn't been ground flat, and when shooting heavy recoiling loads, can damage and/or break your guide rod (and nobody wants that). So, you need to grind a flat side onto your recoil spring.

Before:


After:




I don't have a grinding wheel, so I used a coarse honing stone to grind the end flat.

Here is another before and after:


This applies to both .45 and 10mm XDms.

More to come after I shoot this bad boy.


What? Do you mean all those folks chewing up their aftermarket guide rods with aftermarket springs ARE ACTUALLY THE PROBLEM? Not shoddy guide rods?


Say it ain’t so!!!
 

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bought same spring, its in the mail on its way, will do the mod, thanks, hope it keep my brass from hitting russian space station next outing.
 
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