Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,820 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My brand new unfired 5" .45 TS has a very heavy slide release pressure. Seems to be the same empty; empty mag or fully loaded mag. My local Gun Shop guy says I need to RETRACT THE SLIDE WHILE PUSHING ON THE SLIDE RELEASE! Two hands? How can this be true? Yeah, I shouted. I'm not happy. I mean I didn't know. I'm left handed.

I must admit I haven't yet read the owners manual. Yeah, shame on me. Had I known a mag change would require two (2) hands twice... nope, don't wanna go there. Is there any fix that can correct this design flaw? I wanna be able to drop the slide on a reload using only one (1) hand, like on my old Colt 1911. HB of CJ :) :) :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
I say give it some time and let it get broken in. I don't remember my slide release being all that hard. I can fairly easy drop the slide with one hand (thumb) now. Just for reference I bought my 5" XD45 in February of this year, and I'm right handed. Also try a little gun oil or lube on the slide release that may help too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,586 Posts
Had I known a mag change would require two (2) hands twice... nope, don't wanna go there.
Huh??
Just rack the slide like you are supposed to when loading a fresh mag and you will never need the slide catch lever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Just leave it be, put a couple hundred rounds through it and it will take care of itself. All new guns are tight. I couldn't release my slide on the xd40 for about 200 rounds, now it's no sweat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
It's NOT a slide release. It's a slide stop lever. It's job is to hold the slide open on an empty magazine, or to manually hold the slide open for cleaning/inspection. Using it as a slide release will wear it out, and eventually it won't be able to do it's job. I know a lot of shooters (including myself, occasionally) use the lever to send the slide forward, but this is incorrect. You should retract the slide fully with your non-shooting hand, and then let it fly forward on it's own to charge the pistol, never touching the slide stop lever.

--John
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,690 Posts
These guns are tight when new, just shoot it and things will smooth out.

While it's good practice to slingshot the slide to chamber a fresh round from a new mag on slide lock, it is in fact faster to use the slide lock lever and every speed-competitive shooter does it this way.

YMMV
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,820 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Finally read the owners manual. Well, ah heck and all. This very old Coot needs to learn new tricks. Yep, its a slide STOP, not a slide RELEASE. There is a difference. Oh well. Where in Oregon is the "Thunder Ranch" located? I need a refresher course. HB of CJ :) :) :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,197 Posts
It's NOT a slide release. It's a slide stop lever. It's job is to hold the slide open on an empty magazine, or to manually hold the slide open for cleaning/inspection. Using it as a slide release will wear it out, and eventually it won't be able to do it's job. I know a lot of shooters (including myself, occasionally) use the lever to send the slide forward, but this is incorrect. You should retract the slide fully with your non-shooting hand, and then let it fly forward on it's own to charge the pistol, never touching the slide stop lever.

--John
No offense, but I'm not sure where you guys learned your pistol handling skills. It is a slide release, regardless of what the manual wants to name it, that is what it is there for. It's function is to release the slide from a locked back position. If it wasn't necessary, then it could be enclosed in the slide & there woul dbe no lever. Just how would you release the slide w/ only one hand w/o using the release, hmm?
Don't worry HB, it will loosen up after you have used it a few times. There is probably a burr or it is just tight. Mine was a little tight when brand new but after a dozen or so mags, it loosened up. FWIW, I am probably older than you.:lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Hmm..I'm not sure what our ages has to do with anything. FWIW, I'm a certified firearms instructor through AZPOST & ADOC. I'm also a certified armorer for Glock, Sig, Remington, and Colt. My earlier post, the one you quoted, is correct. The reason the slide stop lever is located outside the frame is to function as a means to manually lock the slide open for cleaning/inspection/disassembly. If it was concealed within the frame, this would not be possible. As I stated before, the slide stop lever CAN be used to send the slide forward, using one hand, but NO manufacturer I'm aware of recommends doing so, unless absolutely neccessary. You are correct in one aspect...the slide stop lever will loosen up after a while. The surface it engages in the frame will become worn/rounded off after using the lever to release the slide.

--John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,006 Posts
Hmm..I'm not sure what our ages has to do with anything. FWIW, I'm a certified firearms instructor through AZPOST & ADOC. I'm also a certified armorer for Glock, Sig, Remington, and Colt. My earlier post, the one you quoted, is correct. The reason the slide stop lever is located outside the frame is to function as a means to manually lock the slide open for cleaning/inspection/disassembly. If it was concealed within the frame, this would not be possible. As I stated before, the slide stop lever CAN be used to send the slide forward, using one hand, but NO manufacturer I'm aware of recommends doing so, unless absolutely neccessary. You are correct in one aspect...the slide stop lever will loosen up after a while. The surface it engages in the frame will become worn/rounded off after using the lever to release the slide.

--John
Are you one of these same instructors that also teachs the "tacital reload" which tells you to retain your mag, "hold it with your pink and ring finger while slamming in the other mag"?? Puh lease dude. I don't care what your freaking certs are, its a SLIDE CATCH/RELEASE!! Its been done like that alot for a long time.

Oh and 1 more thing on the tactical reload. If I'm in the shiznit, I'm dropping my damn mag andwhere I can and slamming the new one in. Why in the hell would I need to retain a mag?

Stupid
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
Are you one of these same instructors that also teachs the "tacital reload" which tells you to retain your mag, "hold it with your pink and ring finger while slamming in the other mag"?? Puh lease dude. I don't care what your freaking certs are, its a SLIDE CATCH/RELEASE!! Its been done like that alot for a long time.

Oh and 1 more thing on the tactical reload. If I'm in the shiznit, I'm dropping my damn mag andwhere I can and slamming the new one in. Why in the hell would I need to retain a mag?

Stupid
LOL!!! Don't sugar coat it or anything!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Wow. I don't think my certs have anything to do with the functioning of a particular part of a firearm, I never claimed they did. fredj338 questioned where "you guys" learned pistol handling skills. Just stating where my skills/knowledge came from. As for your jab on "tactical reload"--I don't create the standards for the training curriculum for LE, I just teach it. Sorry if you don't agree. If I'm in the "shiznit" as you put it, I want as many rounds as I can get, dropping a partially loaded mag on the ground is stupid, IMHO. Why would anyone perform a "tactical reload" while engaged in the "shiznit"?? THAT would be stupid. A "tactical reload", if neccessary, should be performed during a time in the "shiznit" when cover and or concealment is available, not right in the middle of the action.

--John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,154 Posts
The realm between slide stop and slide release is slim. Some manufacturers put extended slide stops EASILY intended to be used as slide releases. Other manufacturers put pieces so small and flush to the side of the gun that one would NEVER think of using it that way. Still other semi-auto pistols lack a "slide release lever" all together.

The universal technique that I was taught, and all of MY instructors have been taught, and has been in EVERY piece of literature I've ever read has ALWAYS been to disregard the slide stop and pull back on the slide with the weak hand. If the weak hand is incapacitated, use the pocket of your pants on the rear sight to pull back and release.

I wasn't taught to avoid the slide release because it will wear down the gun. I'm also not a Mechanical Engineer and I couldn't tell you how fast use like this would degrade this part. What I CAN tell you is that in an emergency situation most people lose between 40 and 60% of their fine motor skills and trying to move one thumb up there, groping around and trying to press down on a stiff slide catch IS difficult even WITH fine motor skills. Grabbing the slide, ripping back and letting go is an easy universal gross motor skill. Additionally as I previously mentioned some handguns omit a slide catch all together. Try using the "slide release" method with a Walther PPK and you'll soon find yourself going nowhere very fast.

Finally, in response to the guy that thinks tactical reloads are a terrible idea, you're wrong. The tactical reload DEFINITELY has it's place. It conserves ammunition and ensures that you'll have enough for the next fight, and that your magazine will be filled to capacity.

It's not designed to be done while fighting, it's designed to be done during a break in the action. I.E main target goes down but you don't know if 5 of his buddies are going to show up.

Standard drills for me are Fire - Failure to stop - once stopped threat scan 360, either 3 eye or last known threat depending on situation - tactical reload - Safety/Chest/Reholster .
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,690 Posts
See, it's like everything else -- there are multiple opinions.

Competitive speed shooters all use the slide stop/slide release to drop the slide after shooting to slide lock. It's the fastest way by far.

Tactacool shooters are taught not to because they will panic and flail around like a pithed frog after firing their gun apparently.

My opinion is it will take a very long time to wear-down your slide stop/release button and then you just buy a new one and replace it. How many people do you know whose slide stop/release lever has worn out? How many guns have you seen with this problem? Excluding $20 pistols of course.

So, when I'm handling the gun pre-shooting I slingshot it -- this is a real babe-getting move, trust me.

When I shoot to slidelock in any timed/stress event, I use the lever.
Actually, I never shoot to slidelock, I count my rounds.
Hey, let's fight about people who don't count their rounds.
I say they suck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Slide catch or slide release?

Actually, in most cases, it's both. (One exception where it is external, yet only a catch, would be the HK P7 series, which has a seperate provision of releasing the slide by squeezing the cocking lever. Arguably one of the fastest reloads existant.) Most pistols, with an external slide catch, are shaped and either checkered or grooved ON TOP specificly to be released by the thumb.(The 1911, for example)

There's an old saying, "There's more than one way to skin a cat." that's appropriate here. There seems to be a certain segment in shooting today that thinks "their way" is the "only way" and get downright testy about it. The "Cocked And Locked Only" 1911 crowd is a good example.

And for those that disagree with a particular method? Keep in mind that some of us were around before "THE WAY" was found.

In the end, each should do what they are comfortable and competent with. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,752 Posts
it is hard at first but it does get lighter as you use it.
IF it wears out then replace it, but odds are it wont wear out but after many thousands or rounds is by some chance it does you can just buy a new one.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,820 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Great answers all. Sorry if it got a little hot. I'm left handed, which causes all sorts of life long problems; proper pistol shooting being one.

Let's put it this way. If I use my weak hand (my RIGHT) I can EASILY overcome the stiff slide stop--slide release pressure with my thumb.

No problem. What DOES occur when using my STRONG HAND (my left) is that I was trained years ago to use my trigger finger to drop the slide.

The unfired 5" .45 slide stop--slide release is quite stiff and it is difficult for my left hand index finger to release. Is my training out of date?

If it is out of date, then I badly need to take a refresher course. With time, better, mature, proven handgun skills have evolved. No problem.

Sorry I sold my Colt 1911. Oh well. It held 7, my XD holds 13. Never been in a pistol fight. Odds are great I never will be, thank goodness.

However, my best GUESS is here that if and when the unthinkable happens, I will probably just aim the best I can and shoot DRY.

Thus my left handed delimma. (sp) Sorry. Also quite an old coot. Sixty. Thanks for this fantastic Springfield XD forum. HB of CJ. :) :) :)
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top