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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took one of my M 9mms out for what I thought was going to be a fast and furious 500 round break in session. I had to stop at around 350 rounds. The trigger and take down lever got too hot to handle and took quite awhile to cool to the touch. Next time out, I think I will bring a bucket of water to dunk it in. I was shooting relatively fast and building up a round count in short order (not hard with four 19 round mags). Normally, I would not shoot this fast. But, it is still a little surprising just how hot the pistol got. I literally got a blister on my weak hand thumb from the take down lever. I am curious if anyone is aware of a finish that would help disipate heat? Ceracoat immediately came to mind, but after speaking to them it probably isn't the answer. This will obviously only be an issue when a lot of rounds are fired in at a rapid pace. But, I would still like to find a solution.

ranburr
 

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You should try that test with an HK P7 or Steyr GB . You would burn at 30 rds. You can tape your fingers or wear shooting gloves .
 

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If you find yourself in a 350 round firefight with a pistol....go ahead and melt the barrel! You've got substantial issues. LOL

Airflow is the easiest and cheapest way to cool. A bucket of water....oooohhh, don't know that I would try to cool metal that quickly. Bad things...bad things...
 

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Using a bucket of water to "quench" the gun is a very bad idea.

Don't subject your pistol to something like that unless you MUST.

Set it down and let it cool down naturally. Use the opportunity to go out and change targets.

If you really want to keep blasting, you might consider a simple and cheap solution.. like wearing gloves.
 

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If you find yourself in a 350 round firefight with a pistol....go ahead and melt the barrel! You've got substantial issues. LOL

Airflow is the easiest and cheapest way to cool. A bucket of water....oooohhh, don't know that I would try to cool metal that quickly. Bad things...bad things...
Lol.....Very true.....
 

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Gold is one of the best heat dissipators, so gold plate your barrel and slide, but will probably cost hundreds. And it probably only helps a bit.

I dont think handguns are made for extended rapid fire. I wont stress my gun that way and have the barrel overheat and maybe bend and have the next round through it explodes.

It's a good experiment though, now at least we know the limits.
 

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I'm not sure about how effective gold plating would be for dissipating heat. But it wouldn't cost very much at all. Gold plating is one of the cheapest plating methods out there compared to chrome/nickel etc... From what I understand its because how gold spreads very very thin so the amount of material used to cover a given surface area is minuscule.

I'm not quite sure why you would burn 500 rounds through a gun in one session to begin with. break-in periods are mostly BS anyway, and with that type of treatment your as likely to cause damage as you are to improve the guns action.

If you are so set on the neccessaty for a 500 round break in why not just buy a used gun with 500 or so rounds through it and save yourself a couple hundred dollars?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm not quite sure why you would burn 500 rounds through a gun in one session to begin with. break-in periods are mostly BS anyway, and with that type of treatment your as likely to cause damage as you are to improve the guns action.

If you are so set on the neccessaty for a 500 round break in why not just buy a used gun with 500 or so rounds through it and save yourself a couple hundred dollars?
One, all pistols need at least a 500 round break in. 500 rounds is 500 rounds, it doesn't matter if you shoot them all at once or one round a day. If your gun is damaged from 500 rounds, there was something wrong with it already. If I could have found a couple of used XD9s I would have happily bought them. As far as the water goes, doesn't hurt a thing as long as you clean and lube it afterwards.

ranburr
 

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Whether a gun NEEDS a 500rd break in is debatable, it would tell you in the manual to do that if it really made things all that much better. I'm happy with 100 rds or so, and there's no sign of trouble. No burs forming, nothing showing any strange wear, and the gun seems to be wearing the way it should. If you notice something like the ejector has a sharp bur on it, and is putting a ding in the back of the shells you plan on reloading, you just take a shop stone to it, and get rid of the bur (like my XD .45 had). I field stripped mine after the first mag to see if there may be a problem with it that you wouldn't notice until it was too late (say the barrel cracked due to metalurgical defect). I have my doubts as to how much good a 500rd marathon would do. Cooling a gun too fast isn't good for the heat treat, but for it to ruin the heat treated parts the first time, it would have to be hot enough to cook rounds off! If the trigger was getting hot, it may have been close!!! :shock:
 

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One, all pistols need at least a 500 round break in. 500 rounds is 500 rounds
I know you firmly believe this ranburr because I see you post it all the time, attributing peoples malfunctions to a lack of break-in. I do believe there is some (very little) amount of validity to breaking in a gun. I also believe that, while you probably have more experience with firarms than I do, Larry Seecamp probably has more experience than you. So I would invite you to read this thread on the Seecamp forums by Larry Seecamp, the owner of the company who has spent his life as a gunsmith; you might reevaluate your stance.
The L.W. Seecamp Company Forum - Break in Period
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I know you firmly believe this ranburr because I see you post it all the time, attributing peoples malfunctions to a lack of break-in. I do believe there is some (very little) amount of validity to breaking in a gun. I also believe that, while you probably have more experience with firarms than I do, Larry Seecamp probably has more experience than you. So I would invite you to read this thread on the Seecamp forums by Larry Seecamp, the owner of the company who has spent his life as a gunsmith; you might reevaluate your stance.
The L.W. Seecamp Company Forum - Break in Period
I believe that when talking about a Seecamp. He hand finishes his guns. Mass produced guns don't get the same treatment.

ranburr
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I guess I don't understand the reason for firing that many rounds in that time period!
Why not? You ought to be able to shoot as many rounds as you want at any one time. I have gone to schools where we shot a heck of a lot more rounds than that.

ranburr
 
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