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Discussion Starter #1
I'm interested to know if anyone uses shooting gloves. If so why do you use them and provide a brand. I'm in the market for thin, warm weather, gloves to protect my hands from the discomfort of shooting. When I go to the range I usually shoot many different weapons, and expend 300-500 rounds. My hands take a beating. I've used nomex gloves that have been issued, but not specifically for shooting. Any information you can provide will be useful.

Thanks!
John
 

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Why so many rounds? Are you training or just blazing away? If you aren't learning something new or making muscle memory, chances are you are just learning bad habits from fatigue.
 

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These days I shoot about 200 rounds a session; XDM Compact (50) and Sig P238 (100), Ruger LCP (50). This usually leaves my hand stained with ammo residue. I started wearing medical grade latex gloves which keeps my hands clean while not altering my grip in any meaningful way. The Ruger is a nasty little bugger.. so I shoot it last LOL
 

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The only time I would recommend wearing shooting gloves is if you suffer from hyperhidrosis (sweaty palms).

But if you really want to use shooting gloves... you can try out Beretta's Trident shooting gloves. It's thin and will absorb moisture/ sweat from your hands.

 

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What is "taking a beating"? Getting blisters or bruising? If it's blisters then a golf glove would probably help. They are designed to give good grip. If it's bruising, then a glove would need padding and that would tend to mess up your point of aim and general feel -- probably trigger control too. In that case, you would need to man up and improve your grip strength and amount of meat in the mitts.
 

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When I hunt, I often use a pair of the thin Mechanix work gloves. The rubberized palm gives good grip, and the material is thin enough that it really doesn't effect my trigger press.

Can't see why they wouldn't work for your purposes.
 

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What is "taking a beating"? Getting blisters or bruising? If it's blisters then a golf glove would probably help. They are designed to give good grip. If it's bruising, then a glove would need padding and that would tend to mess up your point of aim and general feel -- probably trigger control too. In that case, you would need to man up and improve your grip strength and amount of meat in the mitts.

^ LOL this made me spit up my coffee. I mean seriously, how much "beating" can a pistol dish out? Assuming you are not at the business end of course.
 

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I don't train with them because I don't wear them when I carry.
 

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50 full house rounds SW500 mag, the gloves could come in handy.
Not really. The weight of the .500 and the soft rubber grip do a good job of absorbing recoil to your hands.

Where you feel the recoil from a full house .500 is in your forearms & wrists, trying to keep that muzzle from pointing towards high noon.
 

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I have a pair of UA fleece gloves I use during cold weather. They are thin enough not to get in the way but still keep you warm. They have good grip and are comfortable. I do train with gloves so I'm use to them for winter carry.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Why so many rounds? Are you training or just blazing away? If you aren't learning something new or making muscle memory, chances are you are just learning bad habits from fatigue.
I wouldn't necessarily consider my range trips as training, just practice. If I'm feeling fatigued mentally, I know it's time to quit because then bad habits creep in. I like to fire in as close an environment as I can realistically fire in, and most people aren't going fire their weapons in self-defense with gloves on, but towards the end of my session, usually about the 300 round mark, my hands cause me quite a bit of discomfort. I need to be able to push through the physical fatigue, and firing this amount helps me combat physical fatigue.
 

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What is "taking a beating"? Getting blisters or bruising? If it's blisters then a golf glove would probably help. They are designed to give good grip. If it's bruising, then a glove would need padding and that would tend to mess up your point of aim and general feel -- probably trigger control too. In that case, you would need to man up and improve your grip strength and amount of meat in the mitts.
Blisters in the web of my hand between the index finger and thumb...
 

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I wouldn't necessarily consider my range trips as training, just practice. If I'm feeling fatigued mentally, I know it's time to quit because then bad habits creep in. I like to fire in as close an environment as I can realistically fire in, and most people aren't going fire their weapons in self-defense with gloves on, but towards the end of my session, usually about the 300 round mark, my hands cause me quite a bit of discomfort. I need to be able to push through the physical fatigue, and firing this amount helps me combat physical fatigue.
Not sure I get the difference there . . . . I think of training as the mindful and purposeful execution of technique with a specific end result in mind . . . . . whether learning a new technique/skill/etc, or reinforcing an existing one . . . for example, I regularly train drawing a specific firearm from a specific holster so that I can develop/improve/build on/maintain a desired degree of efficiency, speed, consistent presentation, etc with that equipment combination . . . only difference I see in training and practice is the spelling of the words . . . so help me out with what you mean.

You're right in that as mental fatigue sets in, you can start to make poor decisions, execute incorrect technique, and possibly create, develop, or even reinforce some bad habits that may not have been there before. This can also happen when physically fatigued. Problem is, we may not realize it, all the while thinking we're accomplishing what we intended to do (I'm thinking develop and renforce stress-fire abilities?) but instead we are ingraining improper techiniques. It is very difficult to assess our own techinique when in a stress/fatique/exhaustion condition. If you have a willing buddy, enlist the help of an observer, one that knows (or you can teach) what to look at and what to look for, and can spot where you are taking improper shortcuts. Of course, training courses and the like come to mind, but you can't attend those as much as you want, at least I can't afford to.:rolleyes:

At first, I read your above post as to indicate you felt a need to be able to withstand and persevere through the expenditure of 300+ rounds in a self-defense scenario. I can not know what SD environment or situation you are training for that would regularly call for so many rounds at a time, even in most LE/MIL situations, so my guess is that is not actually your intent. But if it is, Godspeed and luck to you friend, for your sh*t will be in deep. :shock:

My guess is you're being practical and trying to create physical stressors in your sessions that might replicate various SD situations. I'd offer that, rather than using multiple rounds as your path to physical breakdown (at even my local WW prices for .40 S&W, that's about $100-$150 in ammo), why not some good ol' PT? Jog in place or skip rope - push hard - to get that heart rate up (or just run for a bit if you're somewhere you can), and then draw and try to keep that sight picture solid as you gasp for air and your heart beats in your temples. Or, pump out as many pushups as you can, roll over and crank out as many situps as you can, then do it again, then again, no holding back, go to exhaustion and that point where you just can't do one more . . . . then get up, execute a clean draw and move those burning jello arms through a mulitple engagement drill. Now is when you really want that observer, not only to observe your technique, but to help ensure you don't hurt yourself. Pushups are free.

Gotta admit, sure as heck admire your tenacity!!!! And +1 on the Mechanix and other similar grippy - reinforced type work gloves. You could also look at various LEO/MIL type gloves out there that are specifically designed for tactical work and shooting. Just Google "tactical shooting gloves" and you'll have too many to choose from. You get what you pay for, and they are not all created equally. But if you're not necessarily wanting them for tactical work and don't need high levels of dexterity, or even fingers, you can get by just fine with less. Lot of gloves out there that will protect the web of your thumb and allow you to fire combat accurate.

Good luck!!
 

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I don't train with them because I don't wear them when I carry.
This.

If you seriously need gloves to wear while shooting pistols at the range you should probably be shooting a slingshot instead.
 

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Blisters in the web of my hand between the index finger and thumb...

Just try and get the thinnest ones you can. Often those are golf gloves as stated. Pretty cheap too. Might even be able to just put a band-aide where the blisters form BEFORE shooting.

You may also want to try modifying your grip. You may be too tight or too loose. Either way can lead to blisters, tough call from this side of the monitor!
 
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