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4bangin said:
Anybody want to help a fellow xd owner shoot better?
Before this site was hacked, I asked a similar question.....as I am sure MANY others had before me.

Among the many posts in response was a link to a thread over on the Glock-Talk forum. It was a great thread, and IIRC had been made into a "sticky". I just tried to find it, but came up empty.

If anyone knows how to find it and can put the link here, I think it would really help just about all shooters looking to improve accuracy. I seem to remember that some of the guys that posted to the thread were instructors who were highly respected in their field....handgun and shooting instructors.

I don't know if it would be some kind of infringement to have it here on XD-Talk as a sticky, but if it could be...it really should be. It was/is a great thread, and I had looked forward to re-reading it. But that damn hacker...now I don't know how to find the thing. (I really did try).

Peace,
D.
 

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I have a colt python which I can get a 3 inch group with while my xd is more like 12 inches. I'm sure it's me and not the gun so I would be interested to see the post Delija is talking about. Until then I have learned it's best to practice at the range without friends that come along just to waste your ammo :)

Rzeig
 

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Here are a couple of ideas. I assume you are doing practical shooting such as for self defense, for IDPA/IPSC style competition, or for fun. This is not for serious slow fire target shooting.

First, you are way, way too far away from your target. Start at something like 10 feet maximum. What you are striving for is a 6 inch grouping. With slow fire practice you should be able to get a sub 2" grouping at 10 feet with 5 rounds. As you pick up the speed a bit your groups will expand. Your goal should be a 6" group, which is a good blend of speed vs accuracy.

Once you can get 6" groups with non-slow fire, move back to 15 feet. You'll have to shoot more slowly since you are farther away because you'll have to aim more carefully. When you can consistently get 6" groups at this distance, move back to 20 to 25 feet. With several repeats of this procedure you will notice how you can shoot more quickly at closer distances, and you will notice your aiming technique and how it takes more concentration at longer distances.

Second, and probably before you do the above exercise, bench rest your pistol at something like 10 to 20 feet. You can make a simple notched wooden support and use an old rag for padding between the wood and the gun. You might be able to use a gallon zip lock bag filled with sand/dirt. Using a bench rest will show what your pistol is capable of, which in the case of the XD seems to be very good groups.

Third, a lot depends on what kind of grip and stance you prefer. My theory is that some people excel with the Weaver, while others excel with the isoscolese. Some like thumbs high, while others don't.

As a generalization, your grip should be something like this. Start with your right hand out in a fake finger gun position with your index finger pointing out and your thumb sticking up. Now take your left hand and place it so that all four fingers are in front of and mesh with the three curled fingers of your right hand. Now put the meaty heals of your palms together and place your left thumb against your right thumb. Done correctly, the tip of your left thumb will only come to about the base of the thumbnail on your right thumb. Your left thumb should be on top of your right thumb. This is how your hands should be when holding the pistol, with fingers against fingers and thumb against thumb. No gap at the heals of your palms. You can experiment with precise thumb position to see what is comfortable. Some folks like thumbs pointing up, some like thumbs pointing almost towards the target (which seems to work well with isoscolese stance), and some even have their thumbs pretty low. I like to have the last segment of my right thumb not touching the gun and pointing up and only very slightly forward, but whatever feels good and works well for you is what you should use.

Trigger finger placement is important, but not something to obsess over IMHO. The center of the swirl on your finger print should be centered on the trigger, but you can also have the first joint against the side of the trigger. If the pistol has a heavy double action pull and your hands are a bit small then some folks kind of push sideways on the trigger rather than pull, but those issues should not apply to an XD.

A good drill is to dry practice pulling the trigger. Make double triple sure the gun is unloaded and all amunition is put away. Hold the gun as if you are going to fire it and then slowly pull the trigger. Be sure you are pointing the gun in a safe direction in case it accidentally fires (this is good discipline even if the gun is known unloaded). Slowly pull the trigger straight back until the striker is released. Watch the front sight the whole time and notice how it moves before, during, and after the trigger is pulled. It should not move at all. Reset the striker by pulling the slide rearwards about .5 inches and dry fire again. Experiment with trigger finger placement and trigger pull to see how it affects the movement of the gun.

Fourth, your stance is important. You can probably find plenty of stuff online. I like Weaver and shoot well with it. One important factor is to keep your left elbow low. There should be a lot of tension, especially at first when learning it. There is a deputy sheriff who shoots at our local IDPA club and he uses isoscolese and shoots superbly.

Your groups depend a lot on how fast you are trying to shoot. Also, things like caffeine or sugar can make you a bit shaky. Wind or other environmental factors might make you less stable. This is why bench rest shooting is helpful in establishing a best case baseline. You will never be this good without the bench rest, so don't get annoyed that you can't shoot 1" groups at 50 feet!

If you are flinching or anticipating the shot you might be pushing the gun subconciously just before you think it is going to fire. This will cause shots to typically go low and/or left. Dry practice can help prevent this problem. If the recoil is bothering you (which is common), there are a couple of cures. First, wear earplugs under earmuffs. Sometimes the noise is as much a trigger of flinching as the recoil of the gun. It's natural to flinch at a loud noise. Second, have someone load your magazines at the range and randomly place snap caps in them. When you try to fire the snap cap you'll readily see if you are flinching. For me this trick was a big help in getting over flinching. A benefit to using snap caps is that when it goes click instead of bang, you can then do a "tap rack aim" drill to clear the malfunction. Another trick is to fire a much more powerful gun (handgun, rifle, shotgun) for a while, and then switch to your pistol right away. This will make your pistol seem very mild and you will have less tendancy to flinch.

Hopefully this has made some sense because it is hard to write descriptions that match what we picture.
 

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most people who say they have 2-4 inch groups at 25 yards are lying or shooting from a rest.
 

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Really all the defence numbers at 25 yards plus are crap in 99.9% of defensive shoot outs I doubt they are over 15 feet tops so IMO if you can keep a 4 inch grouping at 10 to 15 feet your doing great.
 

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There is a reason why most/all CCW and CQC courses instruct you to shoot at paper plates. That 8" diameter is about the size of someone chest (at least the part that matter). If you hit them there, they are going to be in trouble.

If going to competition or such, you may want to tighten your groups. As mentioned earlier, start close and work your way back.

Old School
 
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