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I have ordered or already have the following:
Lee 1000 Progressive Press
9mm dies
Scale
Caliper
ABC's of Reloading

I will be ordering or buying the following soon:
Tumbler
Media Separator
Bullet Puller
Powder
Primers
Bullets

What else is absolutely required?

What else is going to make things easier?

I'll be buying the powder and primers locally to avoid hazmat fees, but where should I look to buy bullets? Should I buy jacketed or lead for plinking and target shoot? What is a good price for lead bullets per 1000 and where should I buy them? How much will I have to worry about lead building in my barrel?

What else do I need to know to get started beyond reading the book?
 

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You might want to invest in a couple of reloading manuals. The "ABC's of Reloading" is a good read and full of useful information but you need some manuals to give you the recipes for reloading. I like Lymans the best if you chose to only get one to start out.

You didn't list a chrono; that would be a great accessory to have. You really like to know if your loads are performing close to the specs given in your reloading manuals.

Bullet type is up to you and your pocketbook. I would suggest starting with FMJ's and have had good luck with Precision Delta. If you decide on lead you have tons of choices. Bayou Bullets and Black Bullet International are good moly coated bullets. No leading problems with my reloads from these two or any other non-moly coated lead bullets.

Go slow, start low and work up loads, have fun, and be safe.
 

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I have ordered or already have the following:
Lee 1000 Progressive Press
9mm dies
Scale
Caliper
ABC's of Reloading

I will be ordering or buying the following soon:
Tumbler
Media Separator
Bullet Puller
Powder
Primers
Bullets

What else is absolutely required?

What else is going to make things easier?

I'll be buying the powder and primers locally to avoid hazmat fees, but where should I look to buy bullets? Should I buy jacketed or lead for plinking and target shoot? What is a good price for lead bullets per 1000 and where should I buy them? How much will I have to worry about lead building in my barrel?

What else do I need to know to get started beyond reading the book?
I hope you are very mechanically inclined, the Lee progressive can be more frustration than anything else. I personally would not buy or recommend any Lee progressive.
You have pretty much what you need to get going. You want at least 2 or 3 reloading manuals, the Lee is one fo the worst IMO. The Lyman & Speer are much better. I would stick to one powder & one bullet type to start, eliminate variables. Lead bullets in the 9mm can be very problematic, start w/ FMJ, NOT plated. Try Precision Delta for cheap FMJ. Start w/ a medium burn rate powder, NOT TightGroup! SOmething liek WSF, Universal or Unique will be more newb friendly. Read your books & make a couple of dummy rounds w/o powder before trying to make any loaded rounds. Load in small 10rd max lots, never more. Adding a impact bullet puller to year gear will come in handy as you will make mistakes.
 

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Agree on the reloading manuals and Precision Delta bullets
 

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One thing that can make things a little easier is a cartridge gauge.
L.E. Wilson Max Cartridge Gage 9mm Luger - MidwayUSA

Basically after you have everything all set up and double checked, you can drop loaded cartridges in the gauge to double check that the case is within spec.

It's not necessary, but it speeds up the process of checking cartridges after you'd set everything up. Instead of checking the "mouth diameter, base diameter, rim thickness and diameter, case and overall length and bullet diameter" with a caliper you can drop it in the gauge and see that it's within spec.

EGW makes a multiple chamber checker that allows you to check 3 or so cartridges at the same time.

You can get away with picking up powder manuals at gunshops for free (they normally have common loads for different sized bullets/calibers for their particular brand of powder).

I will add that if you decide to go with moly coated or lead bullets you should make sure you don't use a powder that burns too fast. It'll work but it becomes a bit smokier than other powders.
 

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One thing that can make things a little easier is a cartridge gauge.
L.E. Wilson Max Cartridge Gage 9mm Luger - MidwayUSA

Basically after you have everything all set up and double checked, you can drop loaded cartridges in the gauge to double check that the case is within spec.

It's not necessary, but it speeds up the process of checking cartridges after you'd set everything up. Instead of checking the "mouth diameter, base diameter, rim thickness and diameter, case and overall length and bullet diameter" with a caliper you can drop it in the gauge and see that it's within spec.

EGW makes a multiple chamber checker that allows you to check 3 or so cartridges at the same time.

You can get away with picking up powder manuals at gunshops for free (they normally have common loads for different sized bullets/calibers for their particular brand of powder).

I will add that if you decide to go with moly coated or lead bullets you should make sure you don't use a powder that burns too fast. It'll work but it becomes a bit smokier than other powders.
A case gage i snice, but it does NOT tell you if your OAL is correct. Their is no rifling in the cae gage & every chamber in every gun is slightly diff. So you still need to use your bbl as a gage to set up your proper OAL & it assures your rounds fit the chamber as well. Case gage is for AFTER yo uhave OAL established for your gun/load. Then it verifies crimp & sizing are correct.
 

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A case gage i snice, but it does NOT tell you if your OAL is correct. Their is no rifling in the cae gage & every chamber in every gun is slightly diff. So you still need to use your bbl as a gage to set up your proper OAL & it assures your rounds fit the chamber as well. Case gage is for AFTER yo uhave OAL established for your gun/load. Then it verifies crimp & sizing are correct.
I spent a couple of hours this past weekend measuring the max OAL for both my 9mm firearms using different case brands.

I did this by seating a bullet long and then removing the taper just enough to allow the case to fit in the cylinder. Then I took my gunsmith hammer and tapped the case in with the rubber side and causing the bullet to get pushed in. I used the slide ejector to help remove the case from the barrel. Then length at this point was the absolute max OAL for a particular bullet, a particular case and a particular firearm combination. I then used the press to push the bullet in a tad more to ensure the round to chamber and empty without any obstructions at all.

The 500 rounds I loaded this past Saturday were loaded specifically for my Sig 226. They chambered great and accuracy was great but they are too long to work with my Springfield XDM. I would have to take the OAL down by 0.03" to ensure it will function.

I will need to do this again for different types of bullets and different case headstamps. Time consuming but interesting data came out of it and I can now better set my OAL based on my goals (specific firearm, specific case type, or general use round that works for all firearms.)
 

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An easier way to do this: close the action, put a wooden dowel or pencil down the bbl & mark the end. Now ope the action & put a bullet in & measure again holding the bullet in place. That is the max OAL for that bullet less 0.10".
 

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An easier way to do this: close the action, put a wooden dowel or pencil down the bbl & mark the end. Now ope the action & put a bullet in & measure again holding the bullet in place. That is the max OAL for that bullet less 0.10".
Interesting method. Sounds much easier. But it wouldn't give as precise results as I obtained. :) I loaded within 0.025" of Max OAL with good results.

I chrono'd 10 rounds of the same case type loaded with 5.5gr of Power Pistol. Average velocity was 1083, Extreme Spread was 58 FPS, Avg PF was 134. I'm going to continue playing with OAL (now knowing my extreme max) and load to see if one recipe seems to stand out.
 

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Interesting method. Sounds much easier. But it wouldn't give as precise results as I obtained. :) I loaded within 0.025" of Max OAL with good results.

I chrono'd 10 rounds of the same case type loaded with 5.5gr of Power Pistol. Average velocity was 1083, Extreme Spread was 58 FPS, Avg PF was 134. I'm going to continue playing with OAL (now knowing my extreme max) and load to see if one recipe seems to stand out.
Actually it would, you are doing the same thing, same measurements, just less work. IMO, fussing w/ OAL to achieve accuracy in a psitol is pointless. I have never seen appreciable gains. Maybe if you can shoot 2" groups @ 50yds, you might be able to find a sweet spot that shaves 1/4" off that.
OAL in a handgun is more about reliability & safety. Too short or too long can cause you pressure issues, especially in small vol/high press rounds like teh 9mm, 40 & 357sig.
 

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Actually it would, you are doing the same thing, same measurements, just less work. IMO, fussing w/ OAL to achieve accuracy in a psitol is pointless. I have never seen appreciable gains. Maybe if you can shoot 2" groups @ 50yds, you might be able to find a sweet spot that shaves 1/4" off that.
OAL in a handgun is more about reliability & safety. Too short or too long can cause you pressure issues, especially in small vol/high press rounds like teh 9mm, 40 & 357sig.
Measuring marks drawn on a stick versus measuring the length of an inert round with a bullet seated to the exact length with digital calipers would seem to be more accurate to me.

Based on what you said "I have never seen appreciable gains" means to me you've tried it. :) Now I am too and will likely have the exact same results that you do and come to the same conclusions you have. But part of the joy of this new hobby is being able to experiment and discover things on my own but ask questions from others along the way. I want to come to some conclusions based on my own personal observations then compare them to what others have stated.

Hopefully at some point, I will be able to provide data on some topic I've performed tests and recorded results on to help another member with their process. And I would also hope that if I do publish results and numbers as facts that they are challenged by someone else doing their own tests to either validate of refute the results of my findings.
 

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I am not trying to disuade you from experimenting, just pointing out it won't matter much. Yes, part of the fun of reloading is doing & learning for yourself. There are tail chasing things, like OAL for accuracy, that are just time consuming w/ no gain for the effort. I like to at least give warning, try to save someone a bunch of time.
As to the OAL method, marking a stick or rod is just as accurate as what you are doing w/ less effort. The amount you push the round into the chamber will vary slightly each time you do it. To each his own, I am just offering a time saving method.
 

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Warning noted.....and thanks. :)
 
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