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Hey Everyone,


A couple of preliminaries. I am a proud owner of an XD9SC, which I have been carrying everyday for about a year. I am also in possession of an XD40 service until my son gets back from Korea. I decided that I would like to try a Glock 19, since I was looking for a larger gun than the XDSC, but not as big as the service, (not a big fan of the XDM compact). Anyway, picked up a used Glock 19, which I have decided that I really like. Only one problem, it throws brass all over the place, including into my head. I have received two dings in 4 trips, (about 500 rounds), to the range. I have asked this question on another forum, and I was told that I was a limp wrister. My shooting partner, a Glock armorer, and COP,said that I wasn’t. On one of the trips also had a couple of jams. Have used several kinds of ammo, including Federal 115 gr from Wal-Mart, Winchester White Box, some of the local range stuff, and some orange box stuff also from Wally World. Best I can remember I have taken head shots from all but the range reloads. On that other forum, I tried to “ask the expert” about a similar thread for a G17, but I apparently I don’t have enough privileges. His advice to the poster was to find ammo that does not hit him in the head. My friend the Glock armorer, and one of his armorer buddies, suspect the ejector. What say you all? I have ordered the OEM ejector/trigger housing, planning to replace one part at a time until I can get this fixed, or I have permanent impairment. Thanks for your help
 

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If you have a friend who is a Glock armorer, who can inspect the gun first-hand and he can't figure it out ... how the heck are we going to figure it out over the inter-web?

I'm guessing it was throwing brass at the previous owner too. It's a fairly common phenomenon with Glocks.

Does it have the stock recoil spring?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My friends diagnosis is the ejector, just wanted to see what others might say. The spring is stock.
 

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My friends diagnosis is the ejector, just wanted to see what others might say. The spring is stock.
Do you mean ejector or extractor? The ejector is part of the Trigger Mechanism Housing & costs about 10 bucks, the extractor & related parts (extractor depressor plunger, spring, & spring loaded bearing) cost about 30 bucks, and the recoil spring assembly costs about 8 bucks. I'd start with a new recoil spring assembly, trigger mechanism housing, and extractor depressor plunger spring. I wouldn't change the extractor unless it is obviously worn or chipped.
 

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I thought Glocks were perfect? :confused:
 

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Probably not the ejector. Unless the ejector's deformed, then it's most likely underpowered ammo/limpwristing or maybe the extractor is chipped. Also, gunk in the extractor spring channel can cause problems like the OP described.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Probably not the ejector. Unless the ejector's deformed, then it's most likely underpowered ammo/limpwristing or maybe the extractor is chipped. Also, gunk in the extractor spring channel can cause problems like the OP described.
We have tried very hard to eliminate limpwristing as a cause. I have paid very close attention to my stance and grip. I have ordered an ejector/trigger housing. I will also get the spring channel cleaned when we replace the part. No obvious damage to the extractor itself. The strange part is that I have had this happen with three different types of ammo, and the only one that ran perfectly is the TN cartridge company reloads from the range. Good information, thanks for the post.
 

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2 out of 500 isn't bad.

Hat and eye pro.....you're chasing something that isn't happening often enough for you to pinpoint.
 

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I don't own a Glock, but I have corrected several pistols which ejected casings at my head. The first thing I check are the empty casings to see if the rims are scraped or bent; then I check the inside bottom of the ejection port (on the slide), looking for tell-tale brass markings. If the casings are being ejected too laterally, the case rim will strike the inside bottom of the ejection port, dent the case rim, and then deflect the casing up (towards the shooter's head).

To correct his, I bevel the top of the ejector tip slightly. Not the extractor mind you. The ejector will then strike the bottom of the casing a tad lower and eject the casing a little higher to clear the bottom of the ejection port. If diagnosed and corrected properly, this has always fixed the problem.

A broken, mishaped, weak, or too strong extractor can also cause feed and ejection problems, but the key is diagnosing an ejector problem by looking at the evidence.
 

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I put about 150 rounds each through two of my Glocks today. I don't normally take note but, after this thread, I noticed that 3-4 casings hit me in the head when shooting my G17. I guess I'm usually too target/task focused to notice. No casings in the head from my G20.

Like I said before, Glocks occasionally toss casings backwards.
 

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Buy this. It's a new ejector housing with an included overtravel stop. It's all of $20 and will improve the trigger by preventing overtravel.

Then buy a new extractor and a spring set. Your total outlay is less than $50. I think you will be good with this.
 

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I put about 150 rounds each through two of my Glocks today. I don't normally take note but, after this thread, I noticed that 3-4 casings hit me in the head when shooting my G17. I guess I'm usually too target/task focused to notice. No casings in the head from my G20.

Like I said before, Glocks occasionally toss casings backwards.
Easy diagnosis. 9mm Glocks are much more sensitive to limpwristing than are more powerful Glocks, e.g., your G20. During a long range session, as we tire or lose concentration, limpwristitis sets in. :cool:
 

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glock recoil assembly springs are tuned for +p loads from the factory becuse that is what the austrian military demands, most self defense ammo that would be carried by law enforcement is +p. range ammo is not +p therefore u will always have weak ejections, the cure is a lower rate or softer recoil assembly spring..... this is why glocks suck, my xd's shoot range ammo and +p loads with about the same ejection, my buddys beretta ejects casings really far(like 15+ feet away) makes me wonder if that isn't causing alot of excessive wear. Sorry to get away from the point, if u own a glock and want to shoot primarily range ammo you need to tune your springs.

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Easy diagnosis. 9mm Glocks are much more sensitive to limpwristing than are more powerful Glocks, e.g., your G20. During a long range session, as we tire or lose concentration, limpwristitis sets in. :cool:
So, that's why it did it at the beginning, middle and end of the session?

It's not limpwristitis. Trust me. It's Glockitis. Some Glocks have it; some don't. It's never happened with my G19. Only with my 17. APDTurbo hit the nail on the head. This also commonly results in a failure of Glock slides to lock back after the last round is fired. The slide is pushed back far enough to charge the weapon but not far enough for the slide catch to engage. If you own more than one Glock (especially 9mm Glocks) and have never been hit with brass or had your slide not lock back after the last round in a magazine, count yourself very lucky.

BTW, at the end of my session, my wrists and concentration were still good enough to run two magazines of triples (two COM, one head) through my G20 with a ~90% hit rate. Immediately before that, I was consistently putting doubles in 4" circles with the G17 - even with brass hitting me in the head. :lol:
 

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glock recoil assembly springs are tuned for +p loads from the factory becuse that is what the austrian military demands, most self defense ammo that would be carried by law enforcement is +p. range ammo is not +p therefore u will always have weak ejections, the cure is a lower rate or softer recoil assembly spring..... this is why glocks suck, my xd's shoot range ammo and +p loads with about the same ejection, my buddys beretta ejects casings really far(like 15+ feet away) makes me wonder if that isn't causing alot of excessive wear. Sorry to get away from the point, if u own a glock and want to shoot primarily range ammo you need to tune your springs.

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They are also built to shoot CIP spec ammo. SAAMI so called +P is almost the spec these guns are made to shoot.

The OP needs to try some Fiocchi 9AP. CIP spec ammo from Europe is much warmer than SAAMI -P spec 9x19mm ammo. Its like running 87 in a big Vtwin when the bike was made to run on 91. A 124 grain bullet needs to be moving 1200fps to get a Glock to cycle the way it was designed to function......
 

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Your chasing a solution without a problem. If the gun runs fine and shoots where you point then done deal. By the way, nice choice on the 19. IMO the Glock 19/23 size is just perfect. There's a reason the NYPD and UN Security Personnel choose them.
 

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Send it to me and I'll check if for you. Make sure send ammo as well, as it may take some extensive testing. :)

Seriously, I found I got hit in the head if I loosen my grip. I experimented where I would let my arms follow the recoil of the gun. Inadvertently, my wrist would also flex a little and it's enough to change the trajectory of the ejected casing. Not sure if this is what's happening to you. It would help if you have someone else shoot it.
 

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So, that's why it did it at the beginning, middle and end of the session?

It's not limpwristitis. Trust me. It's Glockitis. Some Glocks have it; some don't. It's never happened with my G19. Only with my 17. APDTurbo hit the nail on the head. This also commonly results in a failure of Glock slides to lock back after the last round is fired. The slide is pushed back far enough to charge the weapon but not far enough for the slide catch to engage. If you own more than one Glock (especially 9mm Glocks) and have never been hit with brass or had your slide not lock back after the last round in a magazine, count yourself very lucky.
Your chasing a solution without a problem. If the gun runs fine and shoots where you point then done deal. By the way, nice choice on the 19. IMO the Glock 19/23 size is just perfect. There's a reason the NYPD and UN Security Personnel choose them.
I own several Glocks including a 17 and 19. I have never had brass hit me in the head or a failure of the slide to lock back. This includes thousands of rounds with my guns as well as others. Instead of thinking myself lucky I would have to say maybe you are just the one that got a faulty gun.
 
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