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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, after getting into shooing a few years ago I've decided to take the plunge this fall/winter into the world of reloading. I'll be limiting my reloading to pistol caliber, 9mm, .45 ACP, and.38 Special. At some time in the future I may try .357 Mag and .44 Mag loads, but that is a way out from right now, sticking to the 3 calibers that I shoot the most. I've begun reading my Lyman's manual before I actually try to reload any caliber.

I have a few 5-gallon buckets full of 9mm, .45, etc. so brass won't be a problem. Looking at a Dillon 550 progressive press with a set of 9mm and .45 dies which will be an early Xmas present to myself. In the interim, I'd like to get a brass tumbler to clean the casings and possibly begin to lay in a few powder and primer supplies to I'll have everything that I need to get going once the Dillon is ordered.

So, what I'm looking for is a recommendation on a brass tumbler, powder, bullet and primers. Any reloads will be strictly range ammo, not interested in trying any self-defense ammo, factory loads are okay for that purpose. Primers look like CCI will be readily available.

Any constructive recommendations for what could be an all-around good powder of anyone's found what they like for 9, 45 and .38, open to any suggestions. Is this a reasonable approach or should the press come first?

I know there is other equipment that'll be needed, powder measuring, scales, etc. but that can come when I actually order the press.
 

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You'll find that everyone online has their preferences for components. I'll give you mine, but there many good solutions for those calibers. Download a Relative Burn Rate chart and you can generally use powders in the same burn range for the same purpose. I've loaded over 9000 rounds (combined) of the 3 calibers you mention, also almost entirely for range/plinking use. Below is what I've learned along the way.

  • Press:
    • That Dillon will be a great choice, especially if you're planning on loading in bulk. However, I've heard (not experienced first hand) that starting on a progressive involves a much steeper learning curve. Learning to reload one-step-at-a-time might be easier. It can be done, though.
    • Hornady and RCBS also make very good equipment.
      • I personally have a Hornady single stage press. Super tedious and time-consuming when loading in bulk, but I feel like I have pretty good control over what happens since it's only one step at a time.
    • A lot of people say Lee works fine, but also "You get what you pay for". Spend more on a better press if you can afford it.
  • Bullets: Plated pistol bullets from Berry's Manufacturing or Xtreme.
  • Powder:
    • .45ACP: Hodgdon HS-6, WIN231. Both perform extremely well for .45 and dispense ("meter") evenly.
      • WIN231 is "the" powder for .45. That said, HS-6 was my favorite since it burned a little slower making easy .45 recoil even easier. Good accuracy, too.
      • Hodgdon 700X is very economical and performs just fine, but the shape of the powder flake makes it much harder to meter the exact same amount consistently.
    • 9mm: Alliant Power Pistol. Excellent performance on full-length barrels. Some flash out of sub-4" barrels. Meters wonderfully.
      • I've also tried CFE Pistol and Ramshot True Blue. Both meter and shoot well and are good alternatives to PP.
    • .38 Spec: Alliant Unique. A popular choice for that caliber. No complaints from me.
      • I used IMR SR-4756 during the ammo freak-out several years ago (it was all I could find) and found it unsatisfactory. Hard to meter and never burned completely. Dirty.
  • Tumbler: If you can afford it, get a wet, rotary tumbler so you can clean out primer pockets at the same time you clean/shine.
    • I have a dry, vibratory tumbler, and while it works, it's a little dustier and more time-consuming that I would like. Plus, primer pocket cleanout can't be done effectively on a vibe unit and must be done separately.
  • Primers:
    • CCI and Federal for top pick.
    • Winchester works fine, too.
    • Remington, while generally the least expensive, is the only brand that's given me dud primers.
Other hints:
  • Sort your brass by headstamp, if you can stand it. Almost all brass is workable, but you'll find certain brands of brass that requires significantly different die adjustments or that your press just doesn't like at all. Usually in the middle of a big batch :)
  • Bullets and brass are usually cheaper to buy online or at swap meets. Powder and primers are better to buy at stores so you don't have to pay hazmat fees.
Be safe and have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
LivingUpNorth, thanks for your input. I'm looking at a Hornady tumbler and the D-550 is still my first choice. I figure I'll start out slow/cautiously but will eventually get to the point where I'm reloading quite a bit so I'm thinking the progressive press is my best bet. Like the eternal "what's the best ammo for my pistol", I'm planning on trying a few different powders until I find the one that gives me the best results.

Should be a great way to pass the down time during the winter months.
 

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As far as bullets go I'd go powder coated lead. A few cents ea cheaper and just as clean in my experience. Check out Missouribullet.com They seem like good hard cast bullets with a tough coating that holds up.
 

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I can’t add much to LivingUpNorth’s post. There are a bunch of powders that I’ve had good luck with, typically I get better results with a powder that’s good for 38’s and a different for 9’s, Power Pistol had been great for 9.

I have a Hornady progressive press and I’ve been extremely happy with it. Solid and reliable and very fast and Hornady is awesome if you have questions or problems. I have the automatic bullet feeder that really increases speed.

That said you can’t go wrong with Dillon. Just don’t buy Lee.

I use a Hornady tumbler and it works fine but I’ve heard the wet ones work better.

Good luck!
 

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From the peanut gallery

  • Press: Dillon 550 for your first press. For a progressive Dillon, period. I can make a longer post about why some other presses are very good, but not as good.
  • Bullets: Zero, Penn, Brazos, or Magnus Bullets. Trust me. For 9mm the best bullets for precision pistol are Hornady XTP/HAP 115/124 gr. Not required for plinking.
  • Powder:
    • .45ACP: Bullseye or WST (WST is cleaner, but a little less accurate than Bullseye)
    • 9mm: Alliant Power Pistol
    • .38 Spec: Bullseye or WST (WST is cleaner, but a little less accurate than Bullseye)
    • Note: I've never seen W231 outperform BE/WST in 38/45...ever. I suppose it may be possible. Another option is Titegroup, you can use it across the board for 38/45/9mm, its clean and can produce some very good to exceptional results. VVN310 is THE best powder for 45 ACP accuracy up to and including 50 yards and super clean, but expensive. You also don't find it in 38 special. IMO WST and Power Pistol or Titegroup will have you covered.
  • Primers:
    • Federal is the best for pistol I've tested so far for SV loads, then Winchester followed by CCI usually. All are fine, I just prefer the softer Federal primers in wheel guns, with sub 6 lb DA to ensure ignition. All will work fine in Semi-Autos. The Federal GMM primers have the most consistent velocity. I also use magnum primers in my light match loads for more consistent ignition. Don't sweat that yet.
Other hints:
  • From a guy with a Ransom Rest. Don't waste your time sorting by head stamp unless you're shooting at 50 yards. I don't even sort at 25 yards for competition.
Like the eternal "what's the best ammo for my pistol", I'm planning on trying a few different powders until I find the one that gives me the best results.
Look at loads the Bullseye shooters have already posted (as long as its target loads you're after)

Pet Loads of Top Shooters & Loads from the past.
 

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Hi-Tek coated bullets are clean and economical. SNS Casting recommends avoiding the 15 fastest powders with coated bullets account of the heat they produce.
I use Bullseye which is #13 on their chart but have not had any issues, possibly because of the low power target loads I make.
Winchester 231 which is the same as HP 38 would definitely be on my short list.
 

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My comment on sorting brass was more for consistent assembly and not so much about accuracy. I’ve found quite a difference in overall length of finished cartridges when using mixed brass. Having said that, I admit that I’m no expert in the effects of varying c.o.l. Maybe I’m over-thinking it? @JayhawkNavy02, what’s your opinion on cartridge length for range loads? How tight does one need to keep it?


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I started from the beginning with a progressive.

I'm on a Hornady LNL AP, and comparing to some dillion options, the Hornady press was easy to learn on single round style, without worrying about losing any index buttons, and I personally like the primer handling and powder measure better on the Hornady.

Of course, the dillion and hornady both have excellent customer and part support, and both styles have their own quirks.

I like Hornady, but I won't take away from the blue options.

Just about any dry tumbler will get you going, just don't get the treated Lyman media. I primarily use crushed walnut with flitz polishing additive. For rifle, I use untreated corn cob to remove case lube.

Lots of bullet options in pistols, stock up according to your quantity needs.

CFE-pistol is a decent powder for your initial needs, measures exact on my hornady measure. When you step up to 357, H110 is my go-to.

For progressive loading, I always use a separate crimp die whenever possible, much more consistent. When taper crimping cartridges, like 45acp, no adjustment needed on the crimp die when changing bullets in my experience. Roll crimp calibers may require uniform length brass batches and minor adjustments.

Look up the "plunk test", nothing sucks more than having a round that's too long to seat correctly, but too short my also cause feeding and accuracy issues.

Before you spend a lot on equipment, get a reloading manual, read it, then read again. It's easy to buy equipment you don't need, so plan out everything on paper before you start laying down cash.

When you do start, make, and use, a log book. I document every batch I make, even if it's a repeat load, even if it's only 50 rounds, even if it's 1000rds in a marathon loading day.

If you play with high end loads, note your powder batches, and your primer batches. Write down things you don't think make any difference. Write down your testing results.

I keep all my batches packaged together, with load sheets, not the "all in one can" approach. What I'm doing is hedging against a potential problem down the road and hopefully minimizing the number of rounds I may have to break down.

Get something to disassemble rounds up front, whether it's a cam lock bullet puller, or a kinetic hammer style. You'll need one at some point, make it an on-hand item before you do.

If at some point you think you've made a mistake, stop, listen to that voice and fix it. Tearing down a couple hundred rounds to find you didn't make a mistake is still cheaper and safer than blowing up a gun.

Keep only one powder open and on your bench at a time. Don't store powder in your powder measure, empty at the end of each session.

Spot check your powder throws and COALs frequently.

Get check weights for your scale.

Reloading is a very enjoyable activity for me, but it isn't something to do when distracted. Respect the process, and you'll get the most out of it.
 

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I started from the beginning with a progressive.

I'm on a Hornady LNL AP, and comparing to some dillion options, the Hornady press was easy to learn on single round style, without worrying about losing any index buttons, and I personally like the primer handling and powder measure better on the Hornady.

Of course, the dillion and hornady both have excellent customer and part support, and both styles have their own quirks.

I like Hornady, but I won't take away from the blue options.

Just about any dry tumbler will get you going, just don't get the treated Lyman media. I primarily use crushed walnut with flitz polishing additive. For rifle, I use untreated corn cob to remove case lube.

Lots of bullet options in pistols, stock up according to your quantity needs.

CFE-pistol is a decent powder for your initial needs, measures exact on my hornady measure. When you step up to 357, H110 is my go-to.

For progressive loading, I always use a separate crimp die whenever possible, much more consistent. When taper crimping cartridges, like 45acp, no adjustment needed on the crimp die when changing bullets in my experience. Roll crimp calibers may require uniform length brass batches and minor adjustments.

Look up the "plunk test", nothing sucks more than having a round that's too long to seat correctly, but too short my also cause feeding and accuracy issues.

Before you spend a lot on equipment, get a reloading manual, read it, then read again. It's easy to buy equipment you don't need, so plan out everything on paper before you start laying down cash.

When you do start, make, and use, a log book. I document every batch I make, even if it's a repeat load, even if it's only 50 rounds, even if it's 1000rds in a marathon loading day.

If you play with high end loads, note your powder batches, and your primer batches. Write down things you don't think make any difference. Write down your testing results.

I keep all my batches packaged together, with load sheets, not the "all in one can" approach. What I'm doing is hedging against a potential problem down the road and hopefully minimizing the number of rounds I may have to break down.

Get something to disassemble rounds up front, whether it's a cam lock bullet puller, or a kinetic hammer style. You'll need one at some point, make it an on-hand item before you do.

If at some point you think you've made a mistake, stop, listen to that voice and fix it. Tearing down a couple hundred rounds to find you didn't make a mistake is still cheaper and safer than blowing up a gun.

Keep only one powder open and on your bench at a time. Don't store powder in your powder measure, empty at the end of each session.

Spot check your powder throws and COALs frequently.

Get check weights for your scale.

Reloading is a very enjoyable activity for me, but it isn't something to do when distracted. Respect the process, and you'll get the most out of it.
I forgot to mention the log book - great point and a friggin MUST. Track each batch so you know what works.
 

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I forgot to mention the log book - great point and a friggin MUST. Track each batch so you know what works.
I cringe every time I see a newbie "just got into reloading" post with an ammo can full of reloads and not a pen and paper in sight.

Doubly so when said newbie has plucked a recipe out of who knows where and has done no testing.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks to everyone for their input, keep it coming. I've pretty much narrowed my press choice between the Dillon 550 and the Hornady Lock-N-Load Progressive after speaking with a few local reloaders who have both, reading on-line reviews and of course reading the feedback from this Forum. Before spending much of anything on equipment, supplies, etc. I've started reading through my Lyman manual for basic information, all of the new abbreviations, etc. WantBigBoom, I will be keeping full records on every batch of reloads just so see which ones I like better and to keep the better loads consistent.

The journey continues, should be ready to buy my Christmas present to myself by then.
 

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Personally, I think the 650 is a more direct comparison to the LNL AP.

I have heard more than once as well, if you plan for a case feeder, go with a 550 or 650, and that hand feeding for a right hander on the Hornady is more natural.

I hand feed cases and bullets on my Hornady, two bins on the left side of the press, one with cases, one bullets, seems pretty decently efficient for me. Case feeders on the Hornady press are known to be a bit fiddly.

I don't have a lot of press time on the blue presses to refute or support my claims, just internet rumblings and admissions from friends.

Back to these log books really quick, remember as you work up your loads initially, small batches are your friends. I can work up a pistol load with a new bullet or powder in under 50 rounds, and probably half of those would get tore down to be reloaded at the final charge weight I was satisfied with in testing.

Also on testing, maybe it's just my pistols, but I have generally found the most dangerous loads to be at the lower end of the available data, in the form of squibs. Now when I'm working "up" a load, I start high (usually I find at least 2 sources that agree what the "max" level is) and shoot down the ladder progression until I start seeing soot on the outside of the cases and stop. That's the point where your charges aren't fully sealing the brass to the chamber reliably, and I'll pick the charge weight that shows the best grouping above that.
 

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My comment on sorting brass was more for consistent assembly and not so much about accuracy. I’ve found quite a difference in overall length of finished cartridges when using mixed brass. Having said that, I admit that I’m no expert in the effects of varying c.o.l. Maybe I’m over-thinking it? what’s your opinion on cartridge length for range loads? How tight does one need to keep it?
The longer the case the better (within reason). For higher level competition I only use virgin starline brass. You get 2 rarely 3 max before the cases get short and the groups open at 50 yards. At 25 and less it doesn't matter. I can give quarter sized 5 shot groups standing with my mixed brass (starline, winchester, TZZ/IMI). I don't sweat short cases at 25 yards, just shoot them until the brass looks like trash.

Personally, I think the 650 is a more direct comparison to the LNL AP. I have heard more than once as well, if you plan for a case feeder, go with a 550 or 650, and that hand feeding for a right hander on the Hornady is more natural. I hand feed cases and bullets on my Hornady, two bins on the left side of the press, one with cases, one bullets, seems pretty decently efficient for me. Case feeders on the Hornady press are known to be a bit fiddly. I don't have a lot of press time on the blue presses to refute or support my claims, just internet rumblings and admissions from friends.
Absolutely. I'm not amazed by the 550 if you want a case feeder, go w/the 650, its an afterthought. For starting out, the 550 is phenomenal and IMO like a single stage you'll always have a use for it. It can be operated like a single stage or progressive which makes it super friendly to new reloaders. I'm not ecstatic wit the 550 priming system, but it is easy to change from SP to LP primers. That's about the only weakness other than the cost of toolheads. Using a Hornady AP, I've seen inconsistent priming depth and the case feeder isn't as robust. I do like the Hornady Powder measure, but the Dillon can be improved at little or no cost. What you can't overcome with Hornady is the bushing system. That will limit the quality of ammunition you can generate. If you aren't looking to make premier match ammunition, don't sweat it. It saves significant money over Dillon, but you pay a price for convenience. You also can't float dies unlike the Dillon with the Whidden floating toolheads. Not required for pistol ammunition.

I use the whidden floating and standard toolhead setup both. Combined with quality dies and a solid bench secured to prevent movement and quality components you can make ammunition that will and has won pistol and rifle National Championships. With a few minor modifications the 550/650 is more than acceptable for match/precision rifle/pistol sports, and many improvements can be done for free (polishing) or minimal cost (grounding), but some require a larger investment (tool heads, aftermarket upgrades, etc). If your game of choice is benchrest, there are probably better options. However, David Tubb is probably the best American rifleman in history, with 11 NRA National High Power Rifle Championships, 30 Silhouette Rifle Championships, 7 Sportsmen's Team Challenge Championships and 6 NRA Long Range Rifle (600-1000 yd.) National Championships, and 2 Wimbledon Cups. All ammunition was loaded on a Dillon 550 and 650. John Whidden, three time National High Power Rifle Long Range Championused a Dillon 650 for all his ammunition. The Whidden floating die toolheads allow your sizing and seating die to float independently and self align on the cartridge as it enters the die, similar to the way a Forster Coax press operates. For all intents and purposes, it is now like running 3 separate single stage presses simultaneously. Doing this has brought my concentricity measurements from .003”-.008” before modification, to .000”-.003” after, with most rounds falling below .002"

https://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=154783

Handloading: Tips to Reduce Metered Powder Charge Variation

Progressive Presses: Uniformity of Headspace, Powder Charges and Priming

Precision from a Progressive Reloader

POWDER MEASURE in RL450/550/550B | Dillon Precision Forums

Dillon Powder Measure Tuning – Airfield Shooting Club

www.uniquetek.com/store/696296/uploaded/20_Tips_for_Powder_Measure_Accuracy.pdf

www.uniquetek.com/store/696296/uploaded/Humidity_and_Handloading.pdf

Progressive Presses: Optimum Powder Metering Tips

Progressive Presses: Self-Advancing Shellplate Type

I've modified my 650 for match pistol/rifle. I'm happy with the powder performance which is fluctuating by less than most folks can even measure.

Number of Throws: 28
Average: 3.50 grains
Standard Deviation: 0.02
Max Value: 3.54 grains (Note: 1 occurrence)
Min Value: 3.46 grains (Note: 1 occurrence)


3.50
3.48
3.48
3.48
3.50
3.50
3.52
3.48
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.48
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.48
3.50
3.46
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.52
3.50
3.54
3.50
3.52
 

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Not taking away from pro level shooters and the predominance of Dillion use among them.

I do chuckle when discussing of how much better the Dillion presses are when XYZ non-Dillion parts are added, however.

There isn't *as much* die floating on the Hornady as there is on a floating tool head, and no where near what the Co-Ax has, but there is a visible amount of float, and "tricks" that are easy to perform that minimize the run out.

For example, when I'm precision rifle loading, my die sets are locked to the bushings on the up-stroke, and an index mark is Sharpie'd on. I'm seeing around 0.004" as my high end run out, usually less.

For range ammo or a quick run if I ignore the index marks, still only seeing 0.006" or less, though most of that seems to be in the projectile itself.

Primer seating depth on the Hornady has a lot to do with the shell plate deflection, and correcting this had been the only area I've run into that requires some time and aftermarket parts to the tune of an $8 pack of shims from Amazon. A one time shimming saw a great improvement in primer consistency across the board, since the drive hub was the shimmed part, not the individual shell plates.

For my needs, adding a caliber is the cost of dies, bushings, and maybe a shell plate. One-time die setup, and most dies can still be stored in their original boxes. Caliber changes, including primer size change takes me about 20min if I'm also changing powders and powder measure rotors.

I looked long and hard at all the press options before I chose the Hornady, and don't feel I "settled" in the least.

I respect the time and track record Dillion has brought to the home reloader. I just think it's best to be upfront about the quirks of all the progressive offerings, because they all have their quirks, and what's livable for one person is a deal breaker for another.

OP, welcome to the long debate on progressive press virtues, just wait until you start asking about dies and bullets, lol.
 

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I’ve had the Hornady for years and it’s been flawless. I run pistol ammo only but once it’s set up it just runs, the priming system works flawlessly and the powder dispenser is very accurate.

The press rotates one half on the up and one half on the down stroke and the timing is tricky and one time I broke the timing cam and the tech from Hornady spent a full 30 minutes on the phone helping me install the new part and time it properly. Great support.

I have friends who use the Dillon and I’ve got nothing bad to say about it, but I had a single stage RCBS and a Lee Toadmaster and the Hornady is a light year better.

Just my experience.
 

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For my needs, adding a caliber is the cost of dies, bushings, and maybe a shell plate. One-time die setup, and most dies can still be stored in their original boxes. Caliber changes, including primer size change takes me about 20min if I'm also changing powders and powder measure rotors.
This is IMO one of many advantages of the Hornady, quick, inexpensive caliber changes and the ability to easily load ammo without an expensive case feeder easily unlike the 650. The 550 isn't as bad, but somewhat awkward. The AP also has a bullet feeder, which is an afterthought or at best aftermarket option on all Dillon products, with the exception of the 1050, which can be fully automated and in a class of its own without peer at the hobbyist level.

They look like some kind of steam engine part, but the Star Progressive presses are amazing. It's the press that motivated Mr. Dillon to design his own and a company he put out of business. No rifle ammo except straight wall cases and few at best of those, but for pistol cartridges, makes shocking ammunition and defines American craftsmanship, so much so that it was too expensive to be profitable. If you can find one, buy it. Not something I would grab for my first press due to the enthusiast nature of ownership.

StarReloaders.com - Dedicated to Star Machine Works Reloaders

Home of the Star Progressive Reloading Tool



I’ve had the Hornady for years and it’s been flawless. I run pistol ammo only but once it’s set up it just runs, the priming system works flawlessly and the powder dispenser is very accurate. I have friends who use the Dillon and I’ve got nothing bad to say about it, but I had a single stage RCBS and a Lee Toadmaster and the Hornady is a light year better.
I wish Dillon would upgrade their powder measure. Agreed on Lee. I've only had one press and that was enough. Total junk.

If you look at single stages, the best comparison I've found was on Ultimate Reloader, since the Benchrest Guys define precision. The bushing system plays havoc with precision loading. It doesn't float dies, it introduces error. The Lee system which is a variation has the same issues. At some point you'll want a single stage. Much more handy if you have a Dillon 650/1050 that are a PITA to do caliber changes on unlike the 550 which is very quick, but still a useful tool.

Fourteen Reloading Presses Compared: Single-Stage Shootout – Ultimate Reloader

If you don't want to read through all 15 pages tables summarize results below.

BLUF: Best 3 presses: Turban, RCBS Rock Chucker, RCBS Summit
BLUF: Worst 3 presses: Hornady Iron, Hornady Lock n Load, Lee Breech Lock



The numbers are relative position within , 1 = best press (smallest measurement) to 14 based on each metric for ammunition. I repeat above for deviation with the exception of the summary graphic “Average Overall Position” . For overall deviation I then took the average across all metrics to find the press which would produce the most consistent ammunition relative to its peers. I did have a couple ties so assigned the same number to each. Shorter bars are better, and position to the left is better except if there is a tie, which happened above. I avoided ranking based on measurements only as the numbers were not intuitive and made for terrible graphs and the results were the same. This gives a decent visual, based on the data to determine some absolute winners and losers in the category. However, as I mentioned above, does a press with 1/2 the deviation produce twice the performance, I don't know. I'm fundamentally impressed that the RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme was within a fine margin of the Turban CNC Prazipress performance at about 15 -19 percent of the cost.






If you order each category, then rank them relative to performance (greatest precision = lowest number for standing) for each press within that category (1 being best to 14 being worst) you can see how each press fell out. The top two were the RCBS Rock Chucker and the Turban CNC, which tied for performance overall in regards to relative standings. It looks like the Rock Chucker Supreme is a steal, but there is a cautionary note. Only 1 press was used for the test and only 5 rounds per press. I think a follow on test with the top 5 presses and 10 rounds per press from another lot would be interesting and increase the reliability of the data. It looks like where the Turban CNC excels with a slight edge over the RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme is consistency/precision. Comparing the "best" press to worst, the Turban had an average deviation of only .00083" across all measurements versus the Lee Breech Lock with .001793. In gross simplification, the Turban CNC is more than twice as consistent as the Lee Breech Lock, but the Rock Chucker is not far behind for a fraction of the price. After looking at deviation, the RCBS summit, while not excelling in any specific category, did better overall from a consistency standpoint, which IMO is a desirable characteristic for reloading. Does twice the consistency make ammunition twice as good? I don't know and doubt it, but it looks like buy a Rock Chucker and save some $$$. I have a Lee Breech Lock and that press is not stellar.
 

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Auto drive 1050 is one of my "some day" setups.

I've seen a star press once before, but it wasn't for sale and I didn't know what I was seeing at the time.

The rock chucker has been king for the price for a long time. My uncle has been served well by his.

I haven't found anything on my AP that I wish I had a single stage press instead for yet though.

If I was going single stage though, the chucker or co-ax are on my personal short list. The Hornady single stage would be a lot more attractive to me if matching the die setup to my AP wasn't such a pain, but since it is, I've never looked at it hard.
 
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