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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a new gun own but not new to shooting. I recently purchased (after a year of deliberation and research) my first auto hand gun, an XDm 9mm 4.5". My first time shooting it I shot the cheapest Blazer rounds 115gr FMJ. Everything was great. On my second trip to the range I had picked up a tuna can of 900 rounds of Tul-ammo. I shot 190 rounds on that trip but had two FTF with the Tul-ammo on the last magazine. Today was my third trip and I shot 209 rounds, 190 rounds of Tul-ammo and 19 rounds of UMC in the last mag.
What's this all mean?
Well, when I had the FTF on my second trip, I had marked the mag that had the two FTF rounds. When I cleaned my gun that second time I took the mags apart and cleaned them inside out as well. I left a very light film of lube In them.
This last outing, I loaded up with the Tul-ammo and shot 190 rounds no issues.
During my research and asking seasons shooters I was given all kinds of tips and advice but none included anything about cleaning the inside of the mags.
I did something else as well that no one mentioned, after loading the mags and before loading them into the gun, I set them by tapping them on my palm. Thing is I could hear them shift and settle. Don't know if any of this is normal but it seemed to work.
One LST thing I did today was, I shot my last 19 rounds using UMC rounds.
All these rounds are 115 grain FMJ. But, the UMC actually felt like it had a little less kick.
Anyway, no real question here, just wanted to tell about my experience.
Now if anyone wants offer advice or tips or opinions, I'm all for it and extend my appreciation for it all.
 

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Yes, clean a new gun & mags prior to shooting. Lube the friction pts on the gun, nothing on/in mags, it attracts dirt if dropped.
When you say FTF, you mean ft feed, not fire? Ball or fmj should always feed, any gun that is functioning properly. So keep an eye on the mags. Marking them with a Sharpie for ref helps.
Yes umc is Rem bulk cheap ammo, not really good stuff, but goes bang. It runs about 75fps slower than Tula/Wolf, both are pretty dirty to run.
 

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Anytime I get new mags, whether they come with a new gun, or purchased separately, I disassemble and clean them inside and out. I was surprised to see how much manufacturing grit and residue there is in a new mag. A very light coat of lube inside and on the springs seems to help them smooth out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
FTF = Failure to Feed
I can be a bit OCD when it comes to keep the mgs clean and not dropping them. Yet I know things can happen.

I'm also kind of OCD when cleaning the gun after an outing and the night before.
Yes I go through the gun once more the night before (Its just me).

Right before I go to the range, I will take the mag apart and run a dry cloth through it.
*edited*(just light enough to make sure all excess oil is removed but a ever so light film remains. Almost undetectable)*edited*

Im thinking that the FTF I had was because I didn't set the ammo in. Meaning I didnt smack the full mag against the palm of my hand prior to sliding it in the gun.
When I do that I can hear the ammo aligning properly (for lack of a better explanation).

Yes I'm shooting cheap ammo at the range.
Finding the best deal you tend to get unsolicited opinions and recommendations from anyone who walks by when your looking too.
On here though I welcome all.

Everything I've read on the XDm is that it will shoot anything with out much of an issue.

Is there a cheap better alternative for the range other than Tulammo (black box) or UMC?

Thank you
 

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Again, any oil inside your mag is a bad idea. Just drop one into dirt to find out why. If you really feel the need for lubrication, before assembly, spray the springs with graphite or moly, all that is really needed. Btw, if you are not dropping your mags in the dirt, you aren't training or seriously practicing.
 

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Im fairly certain that the failures to feed on the steel case ammo was the ammo itself.

Tula steel cases can be pretty rough and when under pressure of the spring can cause a lot of friction. Much more than the smooth brass casings.


It will just happen with that stuff. If you are having a particularly worse than usual day with the steel ammo roll em around in a rag with some gun oil on it the. Roll em around in a clean rag to get excess oil off.

Ive done this with my XD45 a few times because of very rough steel cases and it has always worked on troubled batches for me
 

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Oil is not a good idea inside the magazine body as it will attract grit and cause more problems than it solves.

One thing you MIGHT try is putting some Armor All on a rag and wiping down the mag body, then wipe it with a clean rag. This leaves a slick, non-sticky coating on the metal that will not attract grit and may help with feeding on the inside, and speedy mag ejection on the outside. If you notice any negatives from it then discontinue its use, but this trick has been used by some "gun gamers" in the past, and I personally tried it on the outside of mag bodies, but since I use mostly XD type plated magazines, have never found it necessary to use inside since they are pretty slick to begin with.

Steel cased ammo, especially that which has some coating applied to it, seems to require more effort in loading as well as feeding in double stack magazines, and may always be a problem.
 

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Im fairly certain that the failures to feed on the steel case ammo was the ammo itself.

Tula steel cases can be pretty rough and when under pressure of the spring can cause a lot of friction. Much more than the smooth brass casings.


It will just happen with that stuff. If you are having a particularly worse than usual day with the steel ammo roll em around in a rag with some gun oil on it the. Roll em around in a clean rag to get excess oil off.

Ive done this with my XD45 a few times because of very rough steel cases and it has always worked on troubled batches for me
This is exactly what happened to me just a couple days ago with Tula steel. It hung up in the mag and caused the top round to stand up in the mag after the slide cycled and the slide slammed into the side of the case and dented it. Shoulda took a pic! The other 4 full mags of Tula steel ran smoothly, and it has run smoothly before. My mags do get dropped so I don't oil them at all, just clean them every 3 months or so.

They are noticeably harder to load in a mag because of the rough texture and I do slap the back side of the mag against my palm to make sure they are all seated (similar to what I do on my SR22 mags).

If you want cheap target ammo, go get some brass reloads from Freedom Munitions or better yet (as I'm sure fred is thinking), get into reloading.
 

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I stopped using steel case ammo in my XDM 9. I bought a bunch of Wolf at one time and after my first outing I sold it and bought brass. What I could was that in the XDM mags, the rounds are jammed so tight to one another to fit 19 in there that the steel cases would basically get suck together because they are not as smooth and slick against one another as brass cases are. I would literally have rounds stopped an inch down into the mag until I have it a few smacks with my palm to free them up. Never had a single issue out of any brass cases ammo.
 

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Putting aside feeding problems, Tulla isn't just steel cased the bullets are steel with a copper coating. They WILL ruin your barrel given time because you're shooting steel down a steel barrel. I also know several ranges who will not allow you to shoot it in their facility as it tears up the backstops.

If you need to save a bit buy reloads from a reputable place, or get into reloading, but I would pass on the steel Russian ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That why I like a forum such as this, you can learn allot from one posting.
fred: thank you for the info. I will make sure that mags are clean and oil free.
Can you recommend a cleaner burning cheap ammo? Since I do not reload (yet) how are the reloads that are on the market?

Bozz: That would explain the first time I cleaned the mags they were extremely dirty. Especial the springs. I'm looking to get a couple more mags (if I can find them at a decent price) so when I do, the first thing I will do is clean them.

fred: what about that Rem oil clean and lubricating spray with teflon? Whats your take that?

Rob: Good Idea, I will keep that in mind as well.

Justsomeguy: I noticed that the Tul seemed harder to load into the mag the first time I used it, but the next time (after cleaning the mag) it wasn't so difficult. I chalked it up to being a newbie with an auto and or new mag needing broke in a bit.

cherryzxd9: since Ive been smacking them around I haven't had any issues.
Anyone use purchased reman's?
cherryzxd9 - have you used the reloads from freedom? I was told to stay away from reloads unless I reload them myself. Unfortunately, I don't have the ability at the moment to do reloading. (it's a story in its self).

ssracer: I didn't have any get stuck in the mag as you described. I also read somewhere that Tul no longer supports or produces any of the “Wolf” brands of ammunition.

snaphook: thanks for the advice. I will have to check my Tul for steel core. I was under the impression that the smaller cal were copper with a lead core.
 

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My husband bought some reloads and almost messed up his new XDS. He did have a slight injury to his hand as well.
 

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I would not shoot reloads done privately, but places like Freedom Munitions are similar to factory loads. Yes, I have shot factory reloads, not necessarily FM.


Sent from the county jail.
 

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Freedom Munitions is owned by the same people who own Extreme Bullets and based on my experience purchasing Extreme bullets they are a reloader I would trust. However, with the price break I get by loading my own ammo I don't purchase assembled ammunition anymore. BTW, loading with plated bullets the costs per round breaks down to 14 cents for 9mm/38 special, 16 cents for 40 caliber, and 18-19 cents for 45 ACP depending on the bullet (heavier bullets cost more).

On Tula ammo. The Brass Max is fairly decent ammo that features a copper plated bullet, so it's not harmful to your barrel. The standard Tula ammo with the steel cases also features steel jacketed bullets and will increase the rate of wear to your barrel by an approximate value of 2.0. So, if you shoot the steel jacketed ammo your barrel will last about 1/2 as long as it would shooting copper plated or raw lead bullets. If you have any question on whether a bullet features a steel jacket hold a magnet to the bullet.

Remington UMC bulk ammo. The ONLY squibs I've experienced with commercial name brand ammo I've experienced was two squibs out of the same 250 pak of UMC 45 ACP. However, I have heard of a single squib using Federal Champion and of several with with Winchester White Box from other shooters. The moral is this, with any ammunition it is your responsibility to pay attention for squibs.

Personally, I think that these Tactical Malfunction drills are an invitation to blow up your handgun. When a squib happens it will typically lack the power to cycle the slide. So, if you go into a Malfunction Drill you WILL[/b] end up shooting into a squib in your barrel. If you want to be truly Tactical then join the Marines and blow up a Taxpayers gun. Note, with a quality semi shooting into a squib won't normally blow up the gun, however it will usually bulge the barrel enough to make field stripping the pistol a real challenge.

The CORRECT thing to do if you have a malfunction that leaves an empty casing in the chamber is to CHECK FOR A CLEAR BARREL. If you keep a wooden pencil, or small dowel, in your range bag this can be done easily by dropping the magazine, locking the slide back, and poking that stick of wood into the barrel far enough so you can see it in the ejection port. Another method is to put a pencil sized penlight into the chamber and see if the light shines out of the muzzle.

After you have confirmed your barrel is actually clear you can then proceed to go into your Tactical Drill, drop and roll, slap in a fresh mag, look left & Right while scowling, look between your legs will keeping the muzzle pointed downrange and do whatever idiotic Tactical crap that seems to be so appealing to younger shooters today. Yeah, NOT a fan of all that Tactical Crap going around and to be honest if I were your opponent I'd just shoot your while you were going through that stupid **** your were trained to do.

Now, my evaluation of commercial economy ammo from before I started reloading.

Remington UMC, a bit dirty and rather weak but worth the cost just because I find Remington cases VERY EASY to work with from a reloading standpoint. I like Remington cases enough that I would actually purchase some more UMC if I needed fresh brass and Starline didn't have anything available.

Winchester White Box. Dirty shooting and a LOT of variation in the shell cases. In fact I've had more issues reloading Winchester cases than any other brand out there. I would not purchase any more WWB for any reason. However, if it's a choice between the standard TULA or WWB for a non reloader I'd recommend the WWB.

Federal Champion. For a lot of years this was my favorite due to the low cost at Walmart and I'm still working with about 6000 cases in 40 and 45 ACP in my reloading. I found it to be a very good ammo for basic range practice but slightly inferior in terms of accuracy when shooting from a rest with optical sights. The cases are pretty good but there is more variation in the resistance when sizing the cases and that is an indication of more variation in the hardness of the brass and the resulting variation in neck tension will impair accuracy slightly. In addition it will also be more prone to set back with the weaker cases so you do need to pay attention for setback when you break open a new box and avoid using any rounds with a noticeably short overall length. Basically, with any new box you should eyeball each row and run a finger tip down each row to spot a "shortie". Also, do NOT carry with Champion and DO not recycle the assembled rounds, load and shoot the magazine empty. Note, one single chambering won't typically set a bullet back more than 0.005 inch and that is perfectly safe. The problem is that if you re-chamber a round multiple times you could have set back of 0.03 inch or more and that will create pressure spikes that start getting into the dangerous region. BTW, in those 6-7000 rounds I fired only about 7 or 8 had visible setback, so it's not a huge issue. However, it can happen so keep an eye out for it.

Speer Lawman. Holy smokes this is good ammo. It shoots clean and the accuracy I saw with a scoped revolver was simply stunning, one 3/4 inch hole in the target at 25 yards from a rest. I've also shot a Dead President (the portrait on a dollar bill) at 50 feet offhand using this in a Sig P229 back when I could focus on handgun sights. The brass is also very good but the primer pockets do tend to run a bit towards the tight side so I generally won't hand prime more than 100 Speer cases at a time. BTW, CCI Blazer cases are the same as Speer from the reloading perspective.

CCI Blazer Brass. This is basically about the same as Federal Champion in terms of cleanliness and accuracy, which means it's a decent range ammo. As for the cases, same as Speer and very consistent for reloading.
 

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Speer Lawman is also the fastest of the "domestic" ammo as far as I have been able to tell from chrono results. I too feel it is pretty good ammo.
 
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