Springfield XD Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay... so I went to the range today to try to correct my low and left issue. It was better, but still low and left. I think part of this issue may be this...

As I am focusing on the front sight I basically see 2 targets... like I am going cross eyed. If I close my left eye I pick up the single target just fine. I want to be a both eyes open shooter so i don't want to get in the habit of closing the non dominate eye. Any one else have this issue? What did you do to correct it? Does it fix itself over time(It has been 15 years since I have shot)?

Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
206 Posts
I am interested in this as well.

Yes yes the search... If you don't want fresh conversation don't post :p
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,428 Posts
Your low and left problem is with grip and trigger pull not site picture. Here's a suggestion try putting scotch tape on the non dominant eye side of you shooting glasses. This will help to train you dominant eye to focus on the sights better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
I can't shoot with both eyes open...just can't do it. I just focus on the front sight and I can see the target just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,263 Posts
you can train yourself to where your non dominant eye can become dominant. It takes some time, but often the double vision is when your eyes are fighting for dominance. I still experience this on occasion, but a quick blink of my left eye puts the right eye in the driver's seat again and the problem won't come back till the next time i pull the gun from the holster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
I suffer from this. Your eyes are fighting for dominance. My solution is to tilt not turn my head down toward the non-dominant eye. You want to get your non-dominant eye below the "line of sight" to your front sight. Try it. Bring the gun up and focus on the front sight with both eyes open. Slowy roll your head over and at some point the second front sight will disappear and you'll be left with one crisp clear front sight.

J
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
I didn't think I could shoot with both eyes open until I started shooting USPSA. It just started happening naturally, while running through stages. Now I feel like I shoot 'better' with both eyes open. I think it takes time and practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
All I can really sugest is practice. While in the service we were taught to shoot sightless during certain courses of fire. Seeing as when clearing buildings, having your weapon at the low position. Then having to raise to eye level, and fire. Without using your sights. I would suggest try drawing from a holster, bring to eye level then fire not using your sights.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,923 Posts
I had a problem similar to yours for awhile. If I tried both eyes open I would see two front sights and two rear sights. I just practiced a lot at home starting out with a spot on the wall about 25 feet away and just changing what I focused on, i.e. the wall, the front sight, the rear sight. Ideally, you should be able to focus on your target. It will come, but it just takes practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
i believe above got it right in the eyes are battling for dominance. practice will help and so will dry firing. i am a big believer in dry fire. that is going to help with your low and left impact too. also the age old aim small miss small. pick the smallest point to aim on the target you have normally where the bullseye turns to the rest of target. yes the line not the bullseye. and then beath and trigger control. dry fire is cheaper thatn range time and i think more important. have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
There are lots of potential problems when one "starts" seeing double targets or worse double front sights.

I am right handed but left eye dominate which has made it difficult to shoot both eyes open except shotgunning. As I got older the difference became a greater problem. At some age over about 35 usually in your 40s your eyes will begin to have more of a problem compensating and working together. It is worse using pistols than rifles but both shooters have or can grow to have problems. Good news is with a little research it is all fixable, especially for shooting at the range.

Shooting 10 meter air pistol I delved into shooting glasses for the range. They can be as simple as tape or a fold down flap that will fit any eyeglasses, or expensive target/ Olympic style glasses. Regardless that doesn't help combat shooting in the real world.

I advise finding a optometrists that is also a shooter. Having him check out your eyes and get his advice. It is possibly an easy fix.

Bottom line is not matter how young you are ultimately you will face vision issues shooting. Unless it is a very serious condition there are fixes to the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
If you have to fire without closing one eye, if you place the gun in front of and focus on target , you will see 2 gun sights, the image on the left is the one your right eye is seeing.

try closing your left eye, and the right image disappears. so do you understand how it works now?

So in conclusion, focus on target and aim with the left image. (assuming you are righthanded). It takes practice and so try dry firing, at the range try double-tapping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
its an optical illussion and normal seeing double front sight. just practice and soon your brain will be able to distinguished bet the two.:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Thank you!! I felt like an idiot. It seems when I shoot everyone is full of advice and cannot understand what I mean when I say I keep seeing double! I know I have great vision, so I knew that wasn't the problem. It is very discouraging. I truly hope practice makes perfect! Now if I could just get rid of the "know it alls" so I can relax! :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Usually low and to the left for a right handed shooter comes from mashing the trigger. Try dry practice with the non dominant eye closed and ease up on the death grip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Here is a video that I came across the other day with a method that I would like to give a try, know as the blink method. Tried dry just pointing at a random point of the bedroom wall after seeing this. Gonna give it a go next range trip. Hope this helps ya.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gCtcI4OzTvM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,645 Posts
I suffered from this when I first got into handguns. I was so used to closing my non dominant eye that when I tried to go both eyes I had a lot of trouble with seeing double sights as well. But through a lot of dry fire practice, my eyes eventually "evened out" for lack of a better term. Just practice bringing up your gun, sighting in on some object with both eyes and just keep focusing on it. Something that helped me was to come up with both eyes, focus on the front sight, and close my non dominant eye for a second and re open it. When I did that I was able to focus perfectly on the front sight with both eyes. Eventually my eyes/brain "learned" and I now don't have to close my non dominant eye at all. I can do it for handguns, for the iron sights on my AR and even for the rifle-style sights on my Remington 1100 slug barrel that I hunt with.

So basic message here is to just stick with it and do a lot of dry practice. It took me probably several months of doing the above procedure several times per week to get my brain and eyes re wired to shoot this way, but now I do it without thought and I find I can transition between targets much faster, can shoot while moving much better and can track moving targets (like a running whitetail deer) much better also. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
I'd agree with the dominance battle as well, and agree with the idea that your 'focus' needs to be on the target, not the sights. And yep, this IS a difficult thing to master. I also happen to have a tool that I use on a couple of different guns to help keep my double vision down to a minimum, and keep my focus where it needs to be (on the target). Red Dot sights have been around for years, and the top shooters have used them since the 80's. I still have a Circa '88 AimPoint in a storage box. This is what and how they were designed for. Focus on the target, both eyes open, move the dot to the target, check what's behind target, pull trigger. I use them for dry fire practice, then remove it when I carry. My rig can be seen in my Avatar. I also make the Sight Mounts.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top