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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ordered a thousand rounds of Freedom Munitions 115 grain remanufactured 9mm about a month ago and I shot 100 rounds of it this morning. I was picking all my brass up at the end I found a case that was split over half way down. I never noticed anything while I was shooting. Luckily, my gun and most importantly my hand are fine. Their website says everything pressure tested so I was fairly confident when I ordered it but not so much now. I am a little concerned about shooting the 900 rounds that I still have left. I emailed Freedom a little bit ago so hopefully I hear back from them tomorrow.
 

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First I've heard, thanks. I've shot thousands of theirs. I check them for bullet OAL as I'm aware of these issues. They'll make it right, I'm sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First I've heard, thanks. I've shot thousands of theirs. I check them for bullet OAL as I'm aware of these issues. They'll make it right, I'm sure.
I'm sure they will too but I'm still a little scared to keep shooting them. I don't want to mess up my gun or my hand. Obviously their pressure testing doesn't work as good as they make it sound.
 

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Well, the pressure testing just checks for flaws in the unreloaded brass - splits or cracks, etc. I doubt that brass had a crack in it before you loaded it, as it wouldn't have retained neck tension on the bullet, leading to crazy setback and a possible failure to feed - and you would have noticed that. These sorts of things happen from time to time. You typically see case neck cracks in rifle brass with bad annealing or when they've been overworked and reloaded too much.

Let us know what Freedom has to say.
 

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Are you sure that it was not on the ground from someone else???
This was my 1st thought as well.
Unless one polices the area for brass before, as well as after shooting, it'd be tough to be 100% sure that it wasn't someone else's brass.
So far, I haven't had any problems with any of FM's products (yet), but if it IS one of theirs, they'll make it good.

In the mean time... If you're leery of shooting the rest, send it to me and I'll dispose of it for you. ;) :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, the pressure testing just checks for flaws in the unreloaded brass - splits or cracks, etc. I doubt that brass had a crack in it before you loaded it, as it wouldn't have retained neck tension on the bullet, leading to crazy setback and a possible failure to feed - and you would have noticed that. These sorts of things happen from time to time. You typically see case neck cracks in rifle brass with bad annealing or when they've been overworked and reloaded too much.

Let us know what Freedom has to say.
So there's not much of a chance of hurting my gun or me given that it wasn't cracked prior to shooting it? I'm shooting them out of Glocks so I was concerned about the chambers not being fully supported and having a kaboom.

I'll definitely let you guys know what freedom says.
Are you sure that it was not on the ground from someone else???
This was my 1st thought as well.
Unless one polices the area for brass before, as well as after shooting, it'd be tough to be 100% sure that it wasn't someone else's brass.
So far, I haven't had any problems with any of FM's products (yet), but if it IS one of theirs, they'll make it good.

In the mean time... If you're leery of shooting the rest, send it to me and I'll dispose of it for you. ;) :D
I was shooing it in a dry sand wash and there were no cases around at all prior to me shooting. I was out in the middle of no where. I picked a random spot to set the dueling tree up on front of the bank. I am 100% positive it's my case.
 

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So there's not much of a chance of hurting my gun or me given that it wasn't cracked prior to shooting it? I'm shooting them out of Glocks so I was concerned about the chambers not being fully supported and having a kaboom.

I'll definitely let you guys know what freedom says.
No, not much of a chance of you being hurt by that type of case failure. An unsupported barrel typically causes the case to bulge at the base of the brass, near the rim. When the case ruptures there without the chamber supporting it, that's when the bad times start. Also, only Glock 40's are prone to this issue from what I know. I could be wrong, though.
 

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I shoot a lot of their ammo without any issues but I only purchase the new and not the remanufactured.
 

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Certainly you might want to take a look at some or all of the remaining rounds to look for any case splits, but I would not be overly concerned about it. It does not require an "overpressure" to produce this kind of split. It could just be a hard piece of brass that had a minor, unnoticeable ding on the case mouth that caused this, or a piece of brass that was more than once fired entering into the reloading process. I get these occasionally in brass I have shot and reloaded that may be of questionable source or just reloaded once too many times. Occasionally you will pick up brass that was used by the 9mm major shooters who will generally leave them lay because once shot at those pressures they are severely stressed and not worth reloading. They may have a normal appearance, but they are so work hardened that they will crack even with only one more loading.

Whatever the cause, be assured it is fairly rare and could even happen with NEW factory ammo, though it is very unlikely. Still... it happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No, not much of a chance of you being hurt by that type of case failure. An unsupported barrel typically causes the case to bulge at the base of the brass, near the rim. When the case ruptures there without the chamber supporting it, that's when the bad times start. Also, only Glock 40's are prone to this issue from what I know. I could be wrong, though.
Certainly you might want to take a look at some or all of the remaining rounds to look for any case splits, but I would not be overly concerned about it. It does not require an "overpressure" to produce this kind of split. It could just be a hard piece of brass that had a minor, unnoticeable ding on the case mouth that caused this, or a piece of brass that was more than once fired entering into the reloading process. I get these occasionally in brass I have shot and reloaded that may be of questionable source or just reloaded once too many times. Occasionally you will pick up brass that was used by the 9mm major shooters who will generally leave them lay because once shot at those pressures they are severely stressed and not worth reloading. They may have a normal appearance, but they are so work hardened that they will crack even with only one more loading.

Whatever the cause, be assured it is fairly rare and could even happen with NEW factory ammo, though it is very unlikely. Still... it happens.
Thanks for the info guys. I feel better about shooting it now.
 

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Worn cases split like that, little danger to the shooter. It just tells me their brass is not once fired but mixed range pickups. One reason I shun remanuf ammo, even from the better companies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Worn cases split like that, little danger to the shooter. It just tells me their brass is not once fired but mixed range pickups. One reason I shun remanuf ammo, even from the better companies.
Thanks Fred. I was pretty concerned at first due to the fact I knew very little about what could happen. As long as I'm not in danger of losing fingers or blowing my gun up then I don't really mind. I wasn't planning on reloading since I'm not set up to reload. At 25 cents a round it's the cheapest 9mm I could find so if 1 out of every 100 splits I guess I will get over it! :smile:

Their website doesn't say that it's once fired, just that it is pressure checked using an automated machine. I wonder how much pressure they use to test them? It is assorted brass. Every brand you can think of....
 

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Ryno... If you're not planning on reloading, but do police your brass, FM does offer a Buy Back program on a Price Per Pound basis. They have a page on their site with the details.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ryno... If you're not planning on reloading, but do police your brass, FM does offer a Buy Back program on a Price Per Pound basis. They have a page on their site with the details.
That's why I picked it all up at the end! :)
 

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@ Ryno... I seriously doubt you will get anything like 1 in 100 to split. You got a relatively rare one. Even reloading my brass up to 10 times I seldom see one split... more like 1 in 10,000, but I don't load them to max pressures at every loading either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
LOL, send 'em back their split crap. :D
That was also in the plans. lol

@ Ryno... I seriously doubt you will get anything like 1 in 100 to split. You got a relatively rare one. Even reloading my brass up to 10 times I seldom see one split... more like 1 in 10,000, but I don't load them to max pressures at every loading either.
Good to know.

I'll shoot the 900 I have left with confidence that I won't be missing any fingers by the end. Thanks for all the input guys!
 
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