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Discussion Starter #1
I found two things today that are leaks in my accuracy.

The first is I found I wasn't holding the two-hand grip strongly enough with my left hand. The interesting thing about this is I have had a tendency to a case of the lefts; when I stiffened the grip, esp. with the left hand, I became more accurate and the errors surrounded the bullseye (this all at 15 yards).

Second, I found that I have a tendency to switch focus from the front sight to the target. I didn't even realize I was doing that, but when I focused clearly on the front sight, getting that post centered in the rear sight gap, I was pretty accurate.


An interesting side observation: I shot my own handloads today (9mm) and they were very accurate, I thought, especially compared to the factory stuff I've been using.
 

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How did you know about your "leaks"?
Did someone teach you today?

Home cooked ammo is always better than store bought.

When I used to reload, the powder charges were very precise. That lead to better accuracy. I just like to shoot at dirt clods and aluminum cans now and use Wolf or gunshow reloads. Still alot of fun :cool:
 

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It is always nice when you have those "Ah ha!" moments. Get some extra practice in soon while those new discoveries are fresh on your mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
How did you know about your "leaks"?
Did someone teach you today?

)
No. I was just experimenting w/ things, realized that the platform was more stable and easier to hold on target if I increased my grip pressure with the left or support hand. I'd kind of regressed to a more comfortable, relaxed grip, and that doesn't work so well.

It's odd, because I felt I had a pretty decent grip, but it turns out I need to grip more strongly (I'm not sure "grip harder" is the right term) and when I do, the whole platform is more stable. And that makes it easier to maintain the sights on target until I pull the trigger, and it seems to isolate the trigger finger better (i.e., pulling the trigger doesn't cause the sight to move off-target).

It also seems the less-strong grip allows for a leftward bias to shots; things centered nicely when I increased pressure.

The look-at-the-sight leak I figured out from just thinking about it, replaying in my mind what I had done with some strings of shots. I have a bit of a vision issue (I wear progressive lenses), and I think my tendency to have my eyes wander to the target from the sight is related to that. But when I really focus on that front sight, get it centered, get the amount of light showing on either side of the blade to be equal, the shots are good.

Much of this is just from introspection, replaying things in my mind, and looking for what I'm doing on shots that are "flyers."
 

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No. I was just experimenting w/ things, realized that the platform was more stable and easier to hold on target if I increased my grip pressure with the left or support hand. I'd kind of regressed to a more comfortable, relaxed grip, and that doesn't work so well.

It's odd, because I felt I had a pretty decent grip, but it turns out I need to grip more strongly (I'm not sure "grip harder" is the right term) and when I do, the whole platform is more stable. And that makes it easier to maintain the sights on target until I pull the trigger, and it seems to isolate the trigger finger better (i.e., pulling the trigger doesn't cause the sight to move off-target).

It also seems the less-strong grip allows for a leftward bias to shots; things centered nicely when I increased pressure.

The look-at-the-sight leak I figured out from just thinking about it, replaying in my mind what I had done with some strings of shots. I have a bit of a vision issue (I wear progressive lenses), and I think my tendency to have my eyes wander to the target from the sight is related to that. But when I really focus on that front sight, get it centered, get the amount of light showing on either side of the blade to be equal, the shots are good.

Much of this is just from introspection, replaying things in my mind, and looking for what I'm doing on shots that are "flyers."
Congrats Mongoose! This kind of "learning" is the kind that can not be taken away from you. It's very rewarding and long-lasting.
If you will concentrate first on the sights, then start concentrating on the smooth trigger pull, i.e., think: "sights, sight, sight, trigger, trigger, trigger" as you squeeze off the round. At first this will take a concentrated effort, even verbalizing these thoughts. After a while, it is an automatic process.
This can be done while dry firing too.
 

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I just had one of the "Ah-ha" moments at the range yesterday also. I'm usually fairly accurate, but not consistent enough to have one of those really great looking targets you always see.:rolleyes: Well, after reading through the sticky on here about accuracy, I realized I always let my trigger reset fully after every shot which causes me to "jerk" the trigger more.

I concentrated on just feeling the reset "click" and going no further, and man that did wonders! Not nearly as much distance to screw up the trigger pull, and makes fast follow-up shots incredibly easy! By the end of a few magazines, there wasn't a bullseye left in the target...I can't wait to get back and do that again. Thanks to whoever put up the accuracy sticky.:D
 

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hummm... I am always looking to improve. Its been a while since I tried to change things. I don't recall if I focus on the front sight or target... You have giving me a good reason to go shooting again...
 

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Good Job. It's a good feeling when you learn something on your own. AND THE SOLUTION WORKS ;)

One thing that helped me improve accuracy was to do this. Think about meat on metal when establishing your grip. The more meat (your hands), you have on your firearm the better. Fill in that space that your shooting hand leaves open on the weak side of the grip and fill it with your support hand. Place your support fingers on top of the grooves from you shooting fingers and squeeze those fingers with your support fingers. The shooting thumb rides over and a little on top of the support thumb.

Not only did it help me manage recoil better so a faster re aquisition of the site picture after the shot could be had, it basically locks down your shooting fingers and prevents them from tightening up during the trigger pull (milking) which causes jerking. What it all gave me was a smoother trigger pull = better accuracy, loss of jerking the trigger = better accuracy, and better rebound after the shot = better accuracy.

Other than dry firing 15 min a day, I also chant "frontsight" over and over again to keep my concentration on the sight and to lessen the tendency to anticipate the shot. That too will cause a jerky trigger.

I hope this can help you like it did me.
Good Luck and keep learning and experimenting. :cool:
 

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Good self-revelation...I paid $45 for an hour+ of instructional time with a pro at the club to learn much the same, along with a few etiquette tips. :rolleyes:
 

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^ It could be many things...

Are his sights accurate? Have you fired the gun supported from a rest? Is he cross eye dominant? How is his grip? Etc...
 
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