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In a few days I'll be traveling from FL to CO by air and, from what I've read CO recognizes FL CCW licenses - but since it's my first time flying with a gun, I would like to get some advice from the members here on how to go about it so that things go as smoothly as possible.

A couple questions that immediately come to mind: I have several plastic hardshell cases, but don't know what the airline or TSA considers an appropriate lock -- can I use a cable lock, running it through both holes in, for example an XDm box? or am I better off with a non-cable, standard locker lock?

Also, how do I transport the ammunition? (does it go in my luggage or in my gun case?)

My GF, who works for an airline has told me that her airline requires that the ammo has to be in a brand new, unopened retail box, which seems a bit ridiculous to me. (If I am flying with a pistol, my intent is to have it loaded at some point at my destination -- by most standards of logic -- if my primary use is for self-defense, then -- by that same logic and based on statistics -- I would more than likely be returning without incident and hence, the exact same amount of ammo only now in an opened retail box -- is a 'sealed box' her meaning? (i.e., taped up, etc.)

ANY help, thoughts, insights or experience GREATLY appreciated.

Thanks.
 

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I have several plastic hardshell cases, but don't know what the airline or TSA considers an appropriate lock -- can I use a cable lock, running it through both holes in, for example an XDm box? or am I better off with a non-cable, standard locker lock?

Also, how do I transport the ammunition? (does it go in my luggage or in my gun case?)
Check out the TSA guidelines: TSA: Traveling with Special Items

You should also check your particular airline's website for information, as it will definitely be available somewhere. One thing I do remember reading in the past, is the lock you use is required to NOT be a TSA lock. Meaning, it CANNOT be a lock that can easily be opened by anyone with the TSA master keys. The intention is that your firearm container can only be opened with you present with the key/combination. Do your research, secure it properly, declare it upon check-in and you should be fine.
 

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Print the TSA guidlines AND print the policy of the carrier your flying with. Don't copy and paste it into word. Print it directly from the website so the date and time plus the website url is printed on the page. Do this a day or two before your trip, for each trip so they're current.

Next, allow yourself AT LEAST an extra hour for check-in. i.e. if you needed 1 hour, show up 2 hours early.

As far as the ammo goes, I don't think they care about it being sealed, just that it's separate. Some don't care if it's in the mag (out of the gun) and some want it in the factory box. Follow the guidelines to a "T" and you should be good.

Check out my post from my first experience flying: http://www.xdtalk.com/forums/xdtalk...arrying-while-flying-my-first-experience.html
 

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Do not carry your gun in the plastic case that came with it. Id say buy a metal case that locks on both sides. You do not want the luggage guys to know whats inside. I think my XD plastic case says Springfield XD on it. Any jackass can pry the plastic case apart. Never trust baggage people. And God knows the airlines magicly loose camera bags and so on!
 

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I fly a lot with weapons that need to be checked in (SFC US Army).
I recently flew on Virgin America and had to do the following with my personal XDm:
1. Ensure the firearm is unloaded and in a hard case box (in this case the box was the XDm case with a TSA approved padlock).
2. Declare to the Check in attendant that I am checking in an unloaded firearm, and that the ammo is kept separate from the firearm case.(Note* you may check in up to 10lbs worth of ammo and it must be in a separate hard case if you do not have it in its original manufacture box. Both the firearm case and ammo case/box may be in the same checked luggage)
3. Check in attendant will have you sign the unloaded firearm declaration tag, and ask you to open the firearm case so they can place the firearm tag in there.
4. They will then tell you to lock up the firearms case, place everything back in the checked baggage and lock the checked baggage.
5. Depending on the airport you may be asked to hand carry your checked baggage to a designated TSA station for TSA to hand inspect your bag before it gets loaded up on a conveyer belt.
Other tips:
I like to place a brightly colored chamber block so check-in attendants and TSA can easily identify that the firearm is unloaded, that way i can avoid having to remove my firearm from the case and rack the slide back in plain view of other passengers.
Ask if the check-in attendant has dealt with checking in firearms before. Most have, but I have encountered some who have not (in which case you just ask for someone that has). This will save you from having your name called over the intercom to return to a designated area to correct something the check-in attendant missed.
When you land at your destination, go straight to baggage claim and pick up your bag. Make sure everything you left with is still in there.
 

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Are you a resident of Florida? Because Colorado does not recognize non-resident permits any more.
 

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Are you a resident of Florida? Because Colorado does not recognize non-resident permits any more.
Can you document that?

This info from Handgunlaw.us was updated last month....


http://handgunlaw.us/documents/USReciprocity.pdf

Looks to me like there is reciprocity between FL and CO. The asterisks indicate that you have to be a resident of the issuing state, but beyond that it looks OK to me.
 

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As far as airline travel it looks like it was covered above. The TSA and your individual airline rules should be pretty clear.

I've had varying experiences, some very quite no problem super professional to let’s call the airport cops over and ask a lot of questions and make me feel like a criminal. Each team knowing I had done everything right helped move things along.
 

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Can you document that?

This info from Handgunlaw.us was updated last month....


http://handgunlaw.us/documents/USReciprocity.pdf

Looks to me like there is reciprocity between FL and CO. The asterisks indicate that you have to be a resident of the issuing state, but beyond that it looks OK to me.
I think that's what he was asking. A Floridian with a Florida carry license is recognized legal in Colorado, whereas a Pennsylvanian with a Florida carry license would not be recognized as legal in Colorado.
 

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I took planedr's comments to mean that CO no longer recognized FL permits, so I cited the reference that shows he should be OK.

Maybe I'm missing something....
 

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I think that's what he was asking. A Floridian with a Florida carry license is recognized legal in Colorado, whereas a Pennsylvanian with a Florida carry license would not be recognized as legal in Colorado.
That's what I meant by Non-Resident permit.
 
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