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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know it takes practice, so any tips would greatly be appreciated. So how do you think I did and how can I improve?


This was the first target, before i got used to firing and how the gun felt.


After my jitters settled down i think it got a little better.


My biggest thing I need to do is learn the sight system. I tried using the 6oclock as stated in the manual and what a friend with XD told me, and just lining the sights up. And i still cant get it :-/
 

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You have room for improvement, we all do.

Do a bunch of dry fire practice. Empty your gun, put your mags and ammo in another room............Then dry fire, pull the slide back an inch or so to reset the striker. Repeat.
Get your sight alignment, sight picture, then slowly increase pressure on the trigger till the trigger breaks. Repeat. Concentrate on keeping your sights on target.

Stay safe.

Kent
 

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I started concentrating more on my trigger pull and breathing and that slowed things down which improved my groupings. Just take your time and keep practicing.
 

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Two of the biggest things I have to keep telling myself at the range are:

1. Concentrate on pulling the trigger straight back. Finger placement helps with this.
2. Concentrate on the front sight. I have a tendency like many to focus on the target. Keeping on the front sight really, really brings my groups together.
 

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At what range and speed of fire were those targets shot? How much general experience do you have with a handgun? What gun was it?

You're sorta all over the place, but still mostly in the "stop" zone. Start off slow and close, no more than 3 yards. Aim carefully and slowly squeeze the trigger, don't jerk it. Shoot 5 rounds, stop and evaluate, then shoot 5 more. At first, take a deep breath and let it halfway out - hold it and pull the trigger. Is your grip and stance comfortable? Doesn't matter if it's not like the "experts", if needs to fit you.

More practice, and we'll help all we can.
 

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What caliber gun and type? You need to use a rest for a couple of magazines. Get a good sight picture and slowly pull straight back on the trigger, the shot should surprise you it's sooo slow. That will give you the point of impact/point of aim. Then transfer to off hand.
 

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Good shooting for your first time out. You might look for an NRA Basic Pistol course offered in your area. It is a great help for most new shooters. Check out my web site to get an idea of what it covers. www.nwohioccw.com Good luck and have fun!
 

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This sounds stupid but try shooting at just 3 yards. As you improve, move it back a little at a time. Grip, stance, sight alignment and trigger control. master these and you will tighten your groups into one ragged hole.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Again this was my first time firing.
I is a XD45 service
It was a 10yard shooting distance(min the range does)

Im gonna try to go back in a few days to try again.
 

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Well, the .45 can be a handful for a beginner. Did you find your arms getting tired after a while? A little work with the weights can help with that - arms and shoulders.

Did you find yourself anticipating the shot at all? You will feel yourself push the gun forward against the anticipated recoil. The shot should surprise you. You can find out if you are doing that by doing a "ball and dummy" drill. Buy some snap caps (which you should have for the dry fire practice anyway!) and have someone load your mag with one or two mixed in with the regular rounds. If your gun stays steady on the target when you hit the snap cap, you aren't anticipating. If you find yourself pushing forward, then you are anticipating and you need more dry fire work.

From your pictures, however, if there was some goblin coming at you he would be hurting pretty bad, so just because you aren't putting cloverleafs on the bridge of the target's nose doesn't mean your shots aren't going to be effective. Certainly work to improve, but you were hitting the target!
 

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This sounds stupid but try shooting at just 3 yards. As you improve, move it back a little at a time. Grip, stance, sight alignment and trigger control. master these and you will tighten your groups into one ragged hole.
Agreed 100%! One thing I still remind myself as ichy_trigger shared: GSSS (Grip, stance, sight, squeeze).:p
 

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Looks like a right handed shooter with a push - anticipating recoil. As already stated, with an unloaded - safe gun, dry fire is one the best practice methods. 15 to 20 minutes a day will help alot. At the range, have a friend load snap caps or an already fired casing randomly in your magazines. The purpose of this is to focus directly on the trigger pull since you won't know where the dummy rounds are. You will be surprised how much you flinch the first few times. Good luck and good shooting.
 

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Looks like a right handed shooter with a push - anticipating recoil. As already stated, with an unloaded - safe gun, dry fire is one the best practice methods. 15 to 20 minutes a day will help alot. At the range, have a friend load snap caps or an already fired casing randomly in your magazines. The purpose of this is to focus directly on the trigger pull since you won't know where the dummy rounds are. You will be surprised how much you flinch the first few times. Good luck and good shooting.
+1 with Pucknut. Maybe a little to much finger in the trigger causing a push to the left. Be sure to squeeze and not jerk. Dry fire practice will help tremendously
 

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Dry practice. Focus on the front sight and squeeeeze until the surprise break. Keep doing that until you stop noticing any flinching on the sights. Develop that muscle memory. You'll want the finger pad on the trigger only, not the knuckle depression or anything beyond that.

Then hit the range to show how well you're doing the dry practice.
 

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This sounds stupid but try shooting at just 3 yards. As you improve, move it back a little at a time. Grip, stance, sight alignment and trigger control. master these and you will tighten your groups into one ragged hole.
I need to do that.. guy I went with is an instructor and took me to an indoor range.. shot like crap at 7+ yards.. so wants me to concentrate on 3 yards for now..
 

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Proof positive that even a novice cant point and click and make badguys go byebye

They might not be a super great tiny tight group...but I guarantee most of your rounds were minute of badguy chest and it would have let the red leak out and have stopped violence against you.

Others are spot on their suggestions!

Wanna learn how the guys whos JOB it is to make badguys sit down and shut up do it

Start here!
http://www.pointshooting.com/freemar.pdf
 

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Proof positive that even a novice cant point and click and make badguys go byebye

They might not be a super great tiny tight group...but I guarantee most of your rounds were minute of badguy chest and it would have let the red leak out and have stopped violence against you.

Others are spot on their suggestions!

Wanna learn how the guys whos JOB it is to make badguys sit down and shut up do it

Start here!
http://www.pointshooting.com/freemar.pdf

Dude, thanks for the .PDF! I have reading material for work tomorrow!
 
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