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Discussion Starter #1
Now, say that really fast three times!

Seriously, I had my first failure to feed in my standard XD40. I use a 20# Don's rod, I had the pistol fairly dry, with CLP as the lube, the ambient temp was between 10 - 20 degrees F. I was shooting 185 grain WWB when I had a failure to feed three times in a row. The pistol has maybe 100 or so rounds through it without a problem. The slide stuck open with the next round touching the feed ramp. I merely tapped the slide forward each time, and after the first three ftf, it functioned perfectly for 20 rounds.

I'm assuming this is a temp/lube/bullet shape problem. Unless there is something else I need to look at.

I've noticed that since I installed the Don's Rod, the action cycles really slowly. Not a problem, as it does reduce recoil and muzzle flip dramatically, but was wondering if this was normal in this setup.
 

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185gr?? That's a big bullet for .40. My money would be on a bullet shape problem. Next time take an assortment of ammo with you and see if it repeats with anything else (smaller). Temp might have something to do with it...but unless CLP turns to pudding in the cold (which I doubt), then I kinda doubt temp is the culprit. These things will run just fine with no lube at all (see the thread on torture test), so any is a bonus.

Could just be one of those cases where you found ammo that your particular gun just doesn't like.

Polishing the feed ramp might be another thing to try...especially given the "tap the back of the slide" solution you had.

Just my $.02.
 

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sjp2452 said:
185gr?? That's a big bullet for .40. My money would be on a bullet shape problem. Next time take an assortment of ammo with you and see if it repeats with anything else (smaller). Temp might have something to do with it...but unless CLP turns to pudding in the cold (which I doubt), then I kinda doubt temp is the culprit. These things will run just fine with no lube at all (see the thread on torture test), so any is a bonus.

Could just be one of those cases where you found ammo that your particular gun just doesn't like.

Polishing the feed ramp might be another thing to try...especially given the "tap the back of the slide" solution you had.

Just my $.02.
Couldn't have said it any better. +1

what kind of ammo were you using?
 

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sjp2452 said:
... Temp might have something to do with it...but unless CLP turns to pudding in the cold (which I doubt), then I kinda doubt temp is the culprit. These things will run just fine with no lube at all (see the thread on torture test), so any is a bonus...
CLP (Cleaner, Lubricant, Protectant) should never be used below 10 degrees F.
It can become very thick as the temp drops. Great stuff down to the freezing point but not made for the cold.

LSA (Lubricant, Semifluid, Automatic Weapon) should never be used below 0 degrees F.
This is what we always used for winter operations in all but the coldest environments.

LAW (Lubricating oil, Arctic Weapon) is only used when the temperature drops below 10 degrees F.
If it is this cold... I'm out of the military now, I dont have to go to the range.
 

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sjp2452 said:
... Temp might have something to do with it...but unless CLP turns to pudding in the cold (which I doubt), then I kinda doubt temp is the culprit. These things will run just fine with no lube at all (see the thread on torture test), so any is a bonus...
CLP (Cleaner, Lubricant, Protectant) should never be used below 10 degrees F.
It can become very thick as the temp drops. Great stuff down to the freezing point but not made for the cold.

LSA (Lubricant, Semifluid, Automatic Weapon) should never be used below 0 degrees F.
This is what we always used for winter operations in all but the coldest environments.

LAW (Lubricating oil, Arctic Weapon) is only used when the temperature drops below 10 degrees F.
If it is this cold... I'm out of the military now, I dont have to go to the range.
 

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StogieC said:
CLP (Cleaner, Lubricant, Protectant) should never be used below 10 degrees F.
It can become very thick as the temp drops. Great stuff down to the freezing point but not made for the cold.

LSA (Lubricant, Semifluid, Automatic Weapon) should never be used below 0 degrees F.
This is what we always used for winter operations in all but the coldest environments.

LAW (Lubricating oil, Arctic Weapon) is only used when the temperature drops below 10 degrees F.
If it is this cold... I'm out of the military now, I dont have to go to the range.
Good info to know--thanks! Of course I could have gotten up off my lazy backside and looked at my CLP bottle before I flapped my yap... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Correction: I was shooting WWB 180 grain bullets.

I'll do a better job with the lube and see how it goes next time.
 

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I found when my XD was new, it took more than 100 rounds through the gun for everything to "settle in". After about 500 rounds, I have not had any problems with FTF/FTE. I had added a Don's guide rod and I think a 24# spring shortly after purchase. Also, I think the heavier spring is partly why your slide is cycling slower (slow is a relative term here). The heavier spring (vs. stock) provides more resistance against your slide coming backwards and slows it down faster. This contributes to why muzzle flip and recoil feels reduced as that extra resistance scrubs off energy.

Just my $0.02... :D
 

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My failure to feed was with the same ammo, from a 50-round box (not the bulk pack). I think it was the profile of the bullet, and early in my ownership. I haven't tried it again to see if it will still choke on it, because it's more expensive than the stuff I normally shoot and like.
 
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