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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My first .223:
55 gn Hornady V-Max
21.6 gn H335
Fed. 205 SRP (shop was out of Win)
COL: 2.250
Going to load 10 and Chrono them tomorrow
Still waiting on that darn stuck case remover :???:
Have a good Thanksgiving all

 

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Looks good, keep us posted on how it shoots
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
The reloads shot smoothly today :p
The Bushmaster ate them with no problem
Chrono'd: 2520 low to 2672 high with an avg @ 2572.5
Haven't tested for accuracy yet but it's a start.
I want to build the load to reach the 3000 fps. area
The stuck case remover was waiting for me when I got back from the range. Pulled out that nasty case and ready to start again.
Hopefully I've learned my lesson...:mrgreen:
 

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Im a complete n00b to reloading so forgive me if im retarded; Your hi and low chrony numbers are 150fps apart, granted thats around 5% but is that normal for handloads vs factory?
do reloaders look at these numbers for their impact (or lack of) on long range accuracy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Im a complete n00b to reloading so forgive me if im retarded; Your hi and low chrony numbers are 150fps apart, granted thats around 5% but is that normal for handloads vs factory?
do reloaders look at these numbers for their impact (or lack of) on long range accuracy?
First load, I was happy they even worked :-D. I'm also very new at reloading. Looking to bring the numbers closer, thinking on getting a pistol and rifle micrometer meter for the powder measure. I measure every 10th drop, that could play in the difference between rounds. Its all a learning experience, and it sure is fun...especially when they go boom...
 

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i didnt mean to detract from your success by any means, sorry LOL
im slowly reading up on handloading to get into it about this time next year, im savin all brass i come across tho. Im sure if you were going for bench accuracy you may have taken extra steps, but what youre doing seems to work just fine!
 

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Looks like you are off to a great start.

I have only reloaded .40 s&w so far and am looking to tackle .223 shortly.

What press and power measure are you using?

I'll be starting on H335 also. ;)
 

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First load, I was happy they even worked :-D. I'm also very new at reloading. Looking to bring the numbers closer, thinking on getting a pistol and rifle micrometer meter for the powder measure. I measure every 10th drop, that could play in the difference between rounds. Its all a learning experience, and it sure is fun...especially when they go boom...
The question can be answered better by what the actual numbers were. It looks from the mean like the highest fps number may be a bit of an outlyer. One way to assess these kinds of things is to drop the low and high value and see where you are.

You did a very smart thing by loading "low" to begin.

I just started reloading a couple months ago, so I see your experiences as mirroring mine.

I just checked my data on the first .223 reloads I shot, and they're similar to yours. I didn't have a 150fps spread, but there was one string of 10 that had a spread of 120fps, most were less than 100.

One good way to compare all this is to shoot some factory loads and see how they stack up. I did that at first, and found a range from 2917 to 3030. Or 113 fps difference (this in 6 rounds). If I'd chrono'd more, the spread would have certainly been higher.

I'm generally under that, so I'm producing ammo that's as good or better than what I've seen factory ammo do.

I was trying to duplicate factory ammo, and did this with Winchester 748 powder: 2936, 2956, 2949, 2904, 2949, 2949, 2930, 2936, 2956. To me, that was a close enough spread for me to be happy.

You're approaching this the same way I did--first, I wanted to see if I could reload some rounds, and not destroy my gun or my eyesight. My initial rounds chrono'd in the 2500fps-range, just like yours.

Then I began to bump it up. I upped the powder charge a bit, got into the 2700s, then eventually bumped it up to produce the charges in the 2900fps range.

You're absolutely right to take it slowly. You might want to check your loads more frequently. I've found I need to throw 15 or more charges before the powder drop settles down, but I'm also visually-inspecting each one.

[Side note on visual inspection: I'm also reloading 9mm, and I can see when the powder drop isn't right. I'm loading for 4.8gr, and if it looks "wrong", i.e., light, I check it on the scale. It's amazing how I can pick out loads that are off by only .3 grains or thereabouts. So I'd suggest, if you're not already doing it, inspecting the loads visually before finishing the rounds.]

Next thing is to check the accuracy of your own reloaded rounds against factory rounds.


Fun stuff, isn't it? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The question can be answered better by what the actual numbers were. It looks from the mean like the highest fps number may be a bit of an outlyer. One way to assess these kinds of things is to drop the low and high value and see where you are.

You did a very smart thing by loading "low" to begin.

I just started reloading a couple months ago, so I see your experiences as mirroring mine.

I just checked my data on the first .223 reloads I shot, and they're similar to yours. I didn't have a 150fps spread, but there was one string of 10 that had a spread of 120fps, most were less than 100.

One good way to compare all this is to shoot some factory loads and see how they stack up. I did that at first, and found a range from 2917 to 3030. Or 113 fps difference (this in 6 rounds). If I'd chrono'd more, the spread would have certainly been higher.

I'm generally under that, so I'm producing ammo that's as good or better than what I've seen factory ammo do.

I was trying to duplicate factory ammo, and did this with Winchester 748 powder: 2936, 2956, 2949, 2904, 2949, 2949, 2930, 2936, 2956. To me, that was a close enough spread for me to be happy.

You're approaching this the same way I did--first, I wanted to see if I could reload some rounds, and not destroy my gun or my eyesight. My initial rounds chrono'd in the 2500fps-range, just like yours.

Then I began to bump it up. I upped the powder charge a bit, got into the 2700s, then eventually bumped it up to produce the charges in the 2900fps range.

You're absolutely right to take it slowly. You might want to check your loads more frequently. I've found I need to throw 15 or more charges before the powder drop settles down, but I'm also visually-inspecting each one.

[Side note on visual inspection: I'm also reloading 9mm, and I can see when the powder drop isn't right. I'm loading for 4.8gr, and if it looks "wrong", i.e., light, I check it on the scale. It's amazing how I can pick out loads that are off by only .3 grains or thereabouts. So I'd suggest, if you're not already doing it, inspecting the loads visually before finishing the rounds.]

Next thing is to check the accuracy of your own reloaded rounds against factory rounds.


Fun stuff, isn't it? :)
Thanks for the input!
It sure is fun stuff
I've been reloading (9mm) @ month and a half now. They've been performing well in my IDPA and USPSA matches, much better than the S&B factory rounds.
The H335 powder (ball) seems to throw much more consistent than the PowerPistol(flake).
I'm going to up the charge, weigh each one, and see where the numbers are. Then I'll shoot some groups. I've been shooting Federal 55gr PowerShocks through my Bushmaster XM15E2S 20" barrel (iron sights) in the low 3000fps range with @2" groups at 100yds. The primer pockets need a lot of attention in these Federals, disappointing...
I have only reloaded .40 s&w so far and am looking to tackle .223 shortly.

What press and power measure are you using?

I'll be starting on H335 also. :wink:
I got the LNL Single Stage Hornady Classic Kit, which comes with everything except dies. Very happy with that setup...the LNL-AP is on the horizon.
Sorry 'bout the long post... it's my 100th :mrgreen:
 

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What do you mean about the primer pockets needing attention?

For precision loads you pretty much need to use a primer pocket reamer to square-off the bottom corners of the pockets to make them uniform.

All brass except Lapua needs this, but you only have to do it once, when they are new, and only for precision reloads.

Reloading turns a good hobby into a great hobby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What do you mean about the primer pockets needing attention?

For precision loads you pretty much need to use a primer pocket reamer to square-off the bottom corners of the pockets to make them uniform.

All brass except Lapua needs this, but you only have to do it once, when they are new, and only for precision reloads.

Reloading turns a good hobby into a great hobby.
With the 9mm S&B brass the primers pop out cleanly.
The Feds leave an uneven ring of metal.
In my inexperience with rifle reloading, is it normal for rifle primer pockets to look like the pic. The Fed#205 SRP just don't sit as nice as the Win WSP in the 9mm.

 

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With the 9mm S&B brass the primers pop out cleanly.
The Feds leave an uneven ring of metal.
In my inexperience with rifle reloading, is it normal for rifle primer pockets to look like the pic. The Fed#205 SRP just don't sit as nice as the Win WSP in the 9mm.
That's the crimp that is used on military cartridges.

There are cases that don't have the crimp, in my experience. Winchester and RP and non-mil FC doesn't have it.

You have to "swage" the primer pocket when it's been crimped to create a smooth chamfer at the edge of the pocket so the primer will easily seat.

There are different methods of swaging--some ream out the primer pocket, removing material, others press a small die into the pocket, pushing the crimp back.

After a fair amount of research, I ended up buying the Dillon Super Swage 600, partly because of reviews, and partly because I'd read some reloaders don't like the idea of removing material from a case.

It works wonderfully, one of the best-designed pieces of equipment I've ever used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hey thanks alot !!!
Your help is really appreciated
After a fair amount of research, I ended up buying the Dillon Super Swage 600, partly because of reviews, and partly because I'd read some reloaders don't like the idea of removing material from a case.
 

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I would like to own a Dillon Super Swage, but I currently use an RCBS chamfer/deburring tool chucked up in a Possum Hollow drill adapter. It's fast and easy and I've had good results with no problems to date. If you just have a handful of cases, you can turn it by hand.
 

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I would like to own a Dillon Super Swage, but I currently use an RCBS chamfer/deburring tool chucked up in a Possum Hollow drill adapter. It's fast and easy and I've had good results with no problems to date. If you just have a handful of cases, you can turn it by hand.
This is also how I process military cases then use a pocket uniforming tool and primer hole deburring tool, trim to length then go for it, 24 grains of 335 will get you closer to your goal and is pretty much my standard load with any powder compatible with the .223 case.
 

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I am not reloading my cases yet but hopefully soon. I have been resizing cutting to length nearly 1500 cases while I wait for $$$ to buy powder primers and bullets.
I ran into a issue while resizing my last batch of found range cases. It seems that most 5.56 cases opposed to .223 cases have a smaller flash hole and snag my dies depriming pin and pull it out of the mandrel. (Lee dies)
Anyone know if this observation has merit or is there any other way to sort the cases so I don't have to dismantle my deprime/resize die and reinsert the depriming pin into the mandrel?
 

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I am not reloading my cases yet but hopefully soon. I have been resizing cutting to length nearly 1500 cases while I wait for $$$ to buy powder primers and bullets.
I ran into a issue while resizing my last batch of found range cases. It seems that most 5.56 cases opposed to .223 cases have a smaller flash hole and snag my dies depriming pin and pull it out of the mandrel. (Lee dies)
Anyone know if this observation has merit or is there any other way to sort the cases so I don't have to dismantle my deprime/resize die and reinsert the depriming pin into the mandrel?
Switch to RCBS dies, The only problem I've had with them is a broken Depriming pin for attempting to deprime a Santa Barbera Surplus case, RCBS not only replaced the pin but sent along 4 extra's just in case I have another sorting issue.
 
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