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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would love to hear what your dry fire practice routine is. I typically draw with from concealment enough times to feel like it is overkill. While doing this I make sure that I get the gun level asap so that I can fire when necessary. I usually finish my draw stroke with sighted fire. I do all of this facing a mirror so I can check my form. Lately I have been drawing and dryfiring while at a run. I try to get a solid shot off within two steps. In addition I try to practice some reloads as this is something I know I need to get smoother at. I would love to hear what others do to practice dry firing.

P.S. I always use snap caps so as to not break anything.
 

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i draw from concealment and shoot at random small things in my house(aim small, miss small) i practice getting a sight pic as fast as i can and squeezing the trigger, then drop the mag, reload and repeat what i did. I do this about an hour everyday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i draw from concealment and shoot at random small things in my house(aim small, miss small) i practice getting a sight pic as fast as i can and squeezing the trigger, then drop the mag, reload and repeat what i did. I do this about an hour everyday.
that is awesome. I need to make a little more time for it myself.
 

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I draw from concealment and shoot at random small things in my house (aim small, miss small) I practice getting a sight pic as fast as i can and squeezing the trigger, then drop the mag, reload and repeat what i did. I do this about an hour everyday.
That actually is a good way to shoot something you don't want to.:oops:
I dryfire practice in the same place most of the time. Verify no ammo is even in the room. 10min at one time is tops. More than that & you can just be practicing poorly. Draw from concealment & present, malfunction & reloading drills. Just enough to stay sharp, 2-3 times a week is plenty if you already have decent shooting skills.
 

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Everyday are wall drill's. Freestyle, strong hand and weak hand.

Monday=Draw
Tuesday=Reloads
Wednesday= Live fire
Thursday= Tac-reloads
Friday=Draw
Saturday=IDPA or USPSA match
Sunday=IDPA or USPSA match


Repeat. If I have a IDPA match that weekend I will practice with concealment on draw day's. If it's a USPSA match that weekend I practice with out concealment.
 

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Dry fire rules
Dry Fire Rules

1. Set a reasonable time limit for the dry fire practice session. 10-15 minutes is optimal. 30 minutes in one session is max for beneficial effort.
2. Designate a dry fire area. Dry fire should only be done in that area.
3. Unload your weapon. Unload all magazines and ammunition carriers.
4. Put all ammo in another room. NO AMMO EVER IN DRY FIRE AREA!
5. Place dry fire target in such a manner that a negligent discharge would be captured. Dry fire targets should only be displayed during practice. Do not use TV images as dry fire targets as this violates rule 5 and 8.
6. Present weapon. Point in a safe direction and recheck to make positive the weapon is empty. Double check magazines and ammo carriers. Triple check.
7. You are now mentally ready for Dry Fire Practice Session. Concentrate on the dry fire practice drills and avoid all distractions. If you experience a distraction, such as a phone call, knock on the door, or a question from someone in the room etc. immediately cease dry fire practice. If you decide to continue, you must return to step 1 and proceed through all the steps.
8. After the last dry fire practice drill is complete, you must mentally leave dry fire practice. Put away the target. Leave the dry fire area and say out loud-“I have completed my dry fire practice”. The session is over!!! DO NOT ALLOW YOURSELF TO SAY OR THINK “ONE MORE TIME”!!!!!!!!!!!
9. Place your weapon in the condition of your choice and review the four safety rules.
1. Treat all guns as if they are loaded!
2. Never point a gun at anything you are not willing to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.
4. Be sure of your target and what is behind it.


If using an outomatic, simulate second shots or only practice one shot from a draw. Raking the slide to cock the hammer should only be done during the re-holster action. All things done during dry fire will become habit; during a gun fight raking after every shot only empties the magazine faster.
 

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My dryfire is usually a mixture of things. Mostly whatever is most fun at the time. IMO just having a gun in your hand will help. The more comfortable you are with it the easier it will be to use.

Typically start with draws for 5-10 minutes
Then reloads 5-10 minutes
Transitions 5-10 minutes
Then I do movement stuff until it gets boring.
After that I'll do draw, reload/transition all in one.

Also I only pretty much only aim at steel plates or USPSA targets. Or the fancy little USPSA mock targets I've cut out of a few spare cardboard boxes lol. Thats what I shoot at in matches so thats what I dryfire on. I've never had to shoot a lightswitch in a match so I don't aim at them haha.
 

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Dry fire rules
Dry Fire Rules

1. Set a reasonable time limit for the dry fire practice session. 10-15 minutes is optimal. 30 minutes in one session is max for beneficial effort.
2. Designate a dry fire area. Dry fire should only be done in that area.
3. Unload your weapon. Unload all magazines and ammunition carriers.
4. Put all ammo in another room. NO AMMO EVER IN DRY FIRE AREA!
5. Place dry fire target in such a manner that a negligent discharge would be captured. Dry fire targets should only be displayed during practice. Do not use TV images as dry fire targets as this violates rule 5 and 8.
6. Present weapon. Point in a safe direction and recheck to make positive the weapon is empty. Double check magazines and ammo carriers. Triple check.
7. You are now mentally ready for Dry Fire Practice Session. Concentrate on the dry fire practice drills and avoid all distractions. If you experience a distraction, such as a phone call, knock on the door, or a question from someone in the room etc. immediately cease dry fire practice. If you decide to continue, you must return to step 1 and proceed through all the steps.
8. After the last dry fire practice drill is complete, you must mentally leave dry fire practice. Put away the target. Leave the dry fire area and say out loud-“I have completed my dry fire practice”. The session is over!!! DO NOT ALLOW YOURSELF TO SAY OR THINK “ONE MORE TIME”!!!!!!!!!!!
9. Place your weapon in the condition of your choice and review the four safety rules.
1. Treat all guns as if they are loaded!
2. Never point a gun at anything you are not willing to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.
4. Be sure of your target and what is behind it.


If using an outomatic, simulate second shots or only practice one shot from a draw. Raking the slide to cock the hammer should only be done during the re-holster action. All things done during dry fire will become habit; during a gun fight raking after every shot only empties the magazine faster.
This sounds like what it mentioned in the Front Sight defensive hand gun course. I didnt go a buddy of mine did and let me read the handbook. Almost word for word.
 

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Dry fire rules
Dry Fire Rules

1. Set a reasonable time limit for the dry fire practice session. 10-15 minutes is optimal. 30 minutes in one session is max for beneficial effort.
2. Designate a dry fire area. Dry fire should only be done in that area.
3. Unload your weapon. Unload all magazines and ammunition carriers.
4. Put all ammo in another room. NO AMMO EVER IN DRY FIRE AREA!
5. Place dry fire target in such a manner that a negligent discharge would be captured. Dry fire targets should only be displayed during practice. Do not use TV images as dry fire targets as this violates rule 5 and 8.
6. Present weapon. Point in a safe direction and recheck to make positive the weapon is empty. Double check magazines and ammo carriers. Triple check.
7. You are now mentally ready for Dry Fire Practice Session. Concentrate on the dry fire practice drills and avoid all distractions. If you experience a distraction, such as a phone call, knock on the door, or a question from someone in the room etc. immediately cease dry fire practice. If you decide to continue, you must return to step 1 and proceed through all the steps.
8. After the last dry fire practice drill is complete, you must mentally leave dry fire practice. Put away the target. Leave the dry fire area and say out loud-“I have completed my dry fire practice”. The session is over!!! DO NOT ALLOW YOURSELF TO SAY OR THINK “ONE MORE TIME”!!!!!!!!!!!
9. Place your weapon in the condition of your choice and review the four safety rules.
1. Treat all guns as if they are loaded!
2. Never point a gun at anything you are not willing to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.
4. Be sure of your target and what is behind it.


If using an outomatic, simulate second shots or only practice one shot from a draw. Raking the slide to cock the hammer should only be done during the re-holster action. All things done during dry fire will become habit; during a gun fight raking after every shot only empties the magazine faster.
I dont get #4. Y does all ammo need to be out of the room? What's the reason?
 

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I dont get #4. Y does all ammo need to be out of the room? What's the reason?
so a distraction, followed by a brain fart, will not allow you to put ammo back in gun, then carry on with dry firing while thinking it is still safe. That extra separation out of room gives you a safety buffer, time to think before loading live ammo. Highly recommend the same discipline for gun cleaning ...
 

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Dry fire rules
Dry Fire Rules

1. Set a reasonable time limit for the dry fire practice session. 10-15 minutes is optimal. 30 minutes in one session is max for beneficial effort.
2. Designate a dry fire area. Dry fire should only be done in that area.
3. Unload your weapon. Unload all magazines and ammunition carriers.
4. Put all ammo in another room. NO AMMO EVER IN DRY FIRE AREA!
5. Place dry fire target in such a manner that a negligent discharge would be captured. Dry fire targets should only be displayed during practice. Do not use TV images as dry fire targets as this violates rule 5 and 8.
6. Present weapon. Point in a safe direction and recheck to make positive the weapon is empty. Double check magazines and ammo carriers. Triple check.
7. You are now mentally ready for Dry Fire Practice Session. Concentrate on the dry fire practice drills and avoid all distractions. If you experience a distraction, such as a phone call, knock on the door, or a question from someone in the room etc. immediately cease dry fire practice. If you decide to continue, you must return to step 1 and proceed through all the steps.
8. After the last dry fire practice drill is complete, you must mentally leave dry fire practice. Put away the target. Leave the dry fire area and say out loud-“I have completed my dry fire practice”. The session is over!!! DO NOT ALLOW YOURSELF TO SAY OR THINK “ONE MORE TIME”!!!!!!!!!!!
9. Place your weapon in the condition of your choice and review the four safety rules.
1. Treat all guns as if they are loaded!
2. Never point a gun at anything you are not willing to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.
4. Be sure of your target and what is behind it.


If using an outomatic, simulate second shots or only practice one shot from a draw. Raking the slide to cock the hammer should only be done during the re-holster action. All things done during dry fire will become habit; during a gun fight raking after every shot only empties the magazine faster.
All great steps. I especially like the targets and believe they should be a must. Targets only up when practicing. Take them down as soon as you are done.
 

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Thetravlor, I just wanted to thank you for the info before I incorporated the "target" part of your post into my regimen.
 

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Steve Anderson was nice enough to write a book called Refinement and Repetition.

I seem to like his drills.
 

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so a distraction, followed by a brain fart, will not allow you to put ammo back in gun, then carry on with dry firing while thinking it is still safe. That extra separation out of room gives you a safety buffer, time to think before loading live ammo. Highly recommend the same discipline for gun cleaning ...
Wouldn't a rule 'Don't smoke pot prior to dry firing' cover this?
 

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I dont get #4. Y does all ammo need to be out of the room? What's the reason?
Because people get distracted & reload a gun then go back to "dry fire" only to blow up the cat. Yes, it happened to a friend of mine. IT's why walking around your house playing gun games w/ a really "unloaded" gun is a bad idea unless you go to extremes to make sure it is never loaded. When I do such things, I tape the slide shut w/ painters tape after I KNOW it's unloaded. You do not want an accident, not even once. A lot of people get shot w/ "empty" guns.:(
 

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I like to practice inside my house, usually while Concealed Carry is on TV Saturday morning. Still new to the HD philosophy, so I carry and draw throughout the morning for an hour or two. 5 minutes here, a draw or two there. Just trying to get some confidence time with the firearm.
I do not have a magazine in the pistol while practicing. Actually they are in another room.
I'm not sure what targets I would put up around my house that could only be practice targets. I practice aiming all over my house. How am I to know where an intruder will be when I come out of my bedroom at 2 o'clock in the morning? Plus when I aim at a white wall I can really see how the front sight pulls as I squeeze the trigger. Although it is odd that the sight pulls right but when I shoot I typically hit to the left.

I do dry fire. I suppose I should find out what a snap cap is.
 

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I like to practice inside my house, usually while Concealed Carry is on TV Saturday morning. Still new to the HD philosophy, so I carry and draw throughout the morning for an hour or two. 5 minutes here, a draw or two there. Just trying to get some confidence time with the firearm. I do not have a magazine in the pistol while practicing. Actually they are in another room. Keep in mind a gun w/o a mag isn't necessarily empty
I'm not sure what targets I would put up around my house that could only be practice targets. I practice aiming all over my house. How am I to know where an intruder will be when I come out of my bedroom at 2 o'clock in the morning? Plus when I aim at a white wall I can really see how the front sight pulls as I squeeze the trigger. Although it is odd that the sight pulls right but when I shoot I typically hit to the left. A paper sil target works fine.

I do dry fire. I suppose I should find out what a snap cap is.
Because in dry fire the gun isn't recoiling & you are jerking at the trigger. When shooting, you are anticipating & pushing at the trigger, shots go low left. Trigger control is #1. You may also try less support hand grip. Most shooters choke the crap out of the gun w/ the support hand & it does affect the direction of the shot, especially under stress or rapid fire drills. The support hand only applies tension, don't over grip.
 

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I shoot high and left.

I'm not sure what "pushing the trigger" means.

I shot 100 rounds yesterday morning at a new steel zombie target I made. I did not notice my support grip being anything excessive.

I do know that I typically fire before I aim the sights. In other words I point the barrel at the target but I do not close one eye, line up the three dots, and slowly squeeze the trigger. That just takes too long and takes away too much of my sight picture. I hit the target, 75% of the time. When I do slow down and aim obviously my shots are much more precise, but is that real world shooting? Seems to me if I can hit a silouhete (sp?) target 75 % of the time and feel more comfortable in my position than taking the time to precisley aim, then I may be better off. Off course I would like my accuracy to improve, which is why I am in this forum and why I practice.

I'm not sure if continuing to practice will cure my high left shooting, or if there is a fundamental that I need to go back, relearn and correct.
 

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I also observe the putting of live ammo in other room, or locking in safe if possible.

Also, so that my girlfriend can observe rule number 1 before doing her own thing, I also make sure that she gets a look at the empty mags and snap caps (after live ammo is secured). Never hurts to get a double check.

Typically, I only practice draws from open carry or concealed; I find mixing the two in the same session makes me lose focus on the differences of the two.

First I'll do some moderate speed draws and shoots to warm up and see where I'm at technique wise. What I see/feel effects how I break the parts down, but I usually go in this order:

Drawing - first slow, then painfully slow, then faster and fast as possible while keeping it from being sloppy.
Next is press outs, without firing. I start slow, making sure the sights are aligned when my arms are extended. I might slow that down, but either way I'll try to speed up too. I find exhaling when you start the press out helps things line up faster. At full speed it turns into a sort of "kiai" like you'd do if you were doing strikes in martial arts. You move fast, and are left with an instant of stillness at the end of the motion.

Third is just plain old dry firing, making sure the grip and trigger squeeze are consistent. Given that you have to rack xd's every shot, I might work in jam clearing drills. I DO NOT ever practice racking the slide just enough to cock the striker - seems to me training something you'd never do in the field is dangerous. Take the time to not enforce bad habits, people.

Then I put it all together, slowly at first, and build to clean draw and shoots in under 2 seconds. That's about it. Usually spend 20 to 30 doing this, no more. Mind starts to wander after that :)
 
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