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Get yourself some snap caps, pull the trigger, and LISTEN to the sound produced. Then take out the snap caps and repeat the process. Once you do that you'll know the correct answer. That is the sound of the hammer smacking into the frame without any cushioning can't be good for the hammer or possibly the frame. I'll also point out that the pin that retains the firing pin is in a blind hole, so if it were to shatter it could be very difficult to get it out.

As for what the manual states, I suspect that they don't include dry firing a gun 1000 to 2000 times per day, what they are referring to is dry firing to check for function and nothing else.
 

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Get yourself some snap caps, pull the trigger, and LISTEN to the sound produced. Then take out the snap caps and repeat the process. Once you do that you'll know the correct answer. That is the sound of the hammer smacking into the frame without any cushioning can't be good for the hammer or possibly the frame. I'll also point out that the pin that retains the firing pin is in a blind hole, so if it were to shatter it could be very difficult to get it out.

As for what the manual states, I suspect that they don't include dry firing a gun 1000 to 2000 times per day, what they are referring to is dry firing to check for function and nothing else.

this is in no way near normal wear and tear 1000-2000 per day ......I think you need to get a life
 

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jazzplayer9- I prefer snap-caps. Others will say they are not needed. It is your weapon and your choice. I think the money was well spent, just my humble opinion.
 

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I've owned Smith revolvers my entire adult life, and have dry-fired the hell out of each and every one of them.
I have never, ever seen frame or hammer damage on any of them...Period.
 

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I've owned Smith revolvers my entire adult life, and have dry-fired the hell out of each and every one of them.
I have never, ever seen frame or hammer damage on any of them...Period.

Likewise for me.

On a personal level. I just don't like to put anything in the cylinder that isn't a live round. Regardless of whatever crazy, bright, non-brass color it is. I'm concerned it will make me do something stupid one day. And if anyone can do something stupid...it's me.
 

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40-45 I didn't say that I actually dry fire 1000-2000 times a day, in my case it's probably only about 50 times a day on average. However I recently saw a post by someone who claimed he snapped the trigger on his revolver 5000 times a day. I also expect that Jerry Miculek didn't gain the ability to shoot at 8 rounds per second without wearing out a few guns by just dry firing them. Of course he's also likely run more than a million rounds downrange because you just can't learn recoil management by dry firing.

However, until recently dry firing has NOT been a common practice for the average handgunner. When I first started shooting a revolver dry firing a gun you were thinking about purchasing wasn't just considered rude, if you did that you owned that gun or were told to never go in that shop again. Now, everyone does some dry firing and IMO the manufacturers haven't yet caugh on to how much this is done.

IMO snap caps are cheap insurance and well worth the cost. As for the potential of an AD, I keep only one gun loaded with live ammo and don't do any dry firing with it. The rest are all immediately loaded with snap caps after a range session and I check them visually every single time before doing any dry firing just in case.
 

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Anything can break.

Doesn't mean it will. Doesn't mean it won't.

I've never broken one of my revolvers (S&W, Ruger or Colt) dry firing them and the S&W's and Rugers were dry fired a lot 25 to 30 years ago.

Even a good quality gun can break. I bought a used Browning BDM and broke the firing pin the first day I got while dry firing it. So, no more dry firing for the BDM (without snap caps). I also will not carry the BDM. Its a safe/range gun from now on. Unique kind of pistol, lots of different/cool features on it. Just no longer dependable in my mind.

I will continue to dry fire my 1911s and other semi auto pistols. If one breaks. I'll fix it and either make a range gun out of it or sell it.

Do what makes you feel better. If you feel the need to use snap caps then use them. You should have confidence in your choice of fire arms. Not having confidence is a bad thing. Don't go there.
 
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